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Creating a cluster on a single Hyper-V host with SAS

    Frage

  • I´m having this "disk bus type does not support clustering" thing when evaluating stroage in FCM. I´m creating a lab, which requires cluster, I´m using Hyper-V 2012 on a HP Powerfull workstation with LSI SAS controller and 2 SAS disks. I´m having 2 W2012 nodes on a same Hyper-V host, which will be members of a cluster.

    With the same hardware and VMware, things worked like this:
    - I had 1 mirorred array of 2 SAS disk on LSI controller.
    - When adding a disk to VM node, I enabled sharing/pass-through option of desired disk
    - I created a volume in first node in Windows Server's Disk Manager
    - As iscsi, evaluation of a storage was done and everything worked as a charm

    With Hyper-V, I don´t know how to do iscsi. Now my disks are as SCSI, and not supported. Question is, how to create a storage correctly, supported my FCM?
    - Should I keep array in LSI? Or should I do single disks?
    - Should I create vdmx inside the Hyper-V host, or should I connect disks directly to a VM nodes?
    - Should I stick with scsi or fiber channel?
    - Which is better, to create a mirrored drive in LSI, or with Windows´s disk manager?

    Freitag, 12. Juli 2013 16:42

Antworten

  • I'm afraid I won't be much help to you on Fibre Channel. I know what all the words mean but I haven't had to do it myself. Call me in a couple of months and the story will be different.

    Setting up the iSCSI target in Windows Server 2012 is really simple. I haven't (yet) written up a step-by-step but I'm sure one is out on the Internet somewhere. You may not even need one.

    In Server Manager, go to the Add Roles and Feature wizard. On the Roles tab under File and Storage Services, install the "iSCSI Target Server". Once that gets done, it shows up under the File and Storage Services heading in Server Manager. The basic process is to create a VHD and a target and tie them together. It's been a few months, but if you've ever done iSCSI at all it's pretty easy. Then in the guests, you can run iscsicpl.exe and connect them up.

    One thing I would recommend that you do is create an internal virtual switch just for iSCSI and have the host and the guests use vNICs attached to that for their iSCSI communications.


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Freitag, 12. Juli 2013 17:20
  • Here's a fantastic post/document by Jose Barreto on how to build a SOFS cluster on a single Hyper-V host. It probably tells you more than you want, but it does go through the whole iSCSI target setup and a lot more: http://blogs.technet.com/b/josebda/archive/2012/08/23/windows-server-2012-scale-out-file-server-for-sql-server-2012-step-by-step-installation.aspx

    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Freitag, 12. Juli 2013 18:54
  • Thanks Eric for support once again, I managed finally setup FailOver Cluster on Hyper-V with proper storages.

    These steps were taken:

    1. An already mirrored disk was formated in Hyper-V host.
    2. In Server Manager Dashboard, via Fail Storage services, iScsi vhd was created.
    3. At both nodes, with scsi initator, nodes were connected to that disk
    4. A disk was formated at Node 1
    5. Disk was discovered in FCM


    Dienstag, 16. Juli 2013 19:57

Alle Antworten

  • For guest clustering in Hyper-V Server 2012, the guests must be able to connect directly to the storage and that storage must support all the SCSI commands necessary to transfer ownership from one host to another. You may not find an easy way to do this with what you have.

    An iSCSI target in the host would be one way. Hyper-V Server does not allow you to install the Microsoft iSCSI target. Windows Server 2012 does, but it will require a full license for the management operating system. There are third-party options available that might work.

    Fibre Channel may be an option if you can configure the virtual SAN in FCM and expose virtual Fibre Channel HBAs to each guest.

    Otherwise, you might consider getting the 2012 R2 Preview. It supports shared VHDX files for guest clustering and might be exactly what you need. I don't know that it's been tried it in a single-host system so your mileage may vary.


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Freitag, 12. Juli 2013 17:01
  • Another option, which I can't believe I forgot since I'm doing it in one of my own labs, is to set up Windows Server 2012 inside another VM and have it expose local storage through the Microsoft iSCSI target.

    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Freitag, 12. Juli 2013 17:10
  • An iSCSI target in the host would be one way. Hyper-V Server does not allow you to install the Microsoft iSCSI target. Windows Server 2012 does, but it will require a full license for the management operating system. There are third-party options available that might work.


    I´m running 2012 datacenter as core, not as a free Hyper-V, so license is not the problem. So can I manage iscsi inside Windows without any 3rd part? How do I do that? I take a look on a fibre channel, but I have no clue what to do there. I have limited experience in storage :)
    • Bearbeitet yannara Freitag, 12. Juli 2013 17:14 edit
    Freitag, 12. Juli 2013 17:13
  • I'm afraid I won't be much help to you on Fibre Channel. I know what all the words mean but I haven't had to do it myself. Call me in a couple of months and the story will be different.

    Setting up the iSCSI target in Windows Server 2012 is really simple. I haven't (yet) written up a step-by-step but I'm sure one is out on the Internet somewhere. You may not even need one.

    In Server Manager, go to the Add Roles and Feature wizard. On the Roles tab under File and Storage Services, install the "iSCSI Target Server". Once that gets done, it shows up under the File and Storage Services heading in Server Manager. The basic process is to create a VHD and a target and tie them together. It's been a few months, but if you've ever done iSCSI at all it's pretty easy. Then in the guests, you can run iscsicpl.exe and connect them up.

    One thing I would recommend that you do is create an internal virtual switch just for iSCSI and have the host and the guests use vNICs attached to that for their iSCSI communications.


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Freitag, 12. Juli 2013 17:20
  • Thanks Eric! You sure pointed me to the right direction.

    Only one thing I´m confused, what actions I need to do in Hyper-V host, and what actions to do in VM Nodes, to accomplish FMC storage compatibility?

    Freitag, 12. Juli 2013 17:33
  • That's a million dollar question, since you can run the tools from anywhere and target anything.

    In this situation, the iSCSI target needs to be installed in the host. Forgive my skimming because I missed the "as core" part, so obviously the Server Manager GUI is not available there. Of course, you can connect Server Manager from another Windows Server 2012 or a Windows 8 installation. You could also use PowerShell. I've become an accidental evangelist for PowerShell, and my general attitude is "anything you can do in the GUI I can do better faster stronger in PowerShell", but the iSCSI target might be a bit much.

    Failover Cluster Manager will target the guests in this scenario.


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Freitag, 12. Juli 2013 17:46
  • I can launch the iSCSI initiator inside the host, no problem. I just kick off iscsicpl.exe from CMD.

    So I create VHD or VHDX on a SAS disk, and it will be shown in scsi initiator?

    Freitag, 12. Juli 2013 17:53
  • Don't run the iSCSI initiator in the host.

    To loosely translate iSCSI terms into regular client/server terms, the initiator is the client and the target is the server. Only install and run the target on the host. Only install and run the initiator in the guests.

    Logically, you create a VHD file and then have the target software use that as a LUN and place a target on it. I believe the wizard makes the process look like it goes in the other direction. You set that up first.

    Then in the guests, run the initiator and have them connect to the target and LUN. Then in one of them, use Disk Management or DISKPART to initialize the connected LUN, format it, etc.

    Finally, run FCM's validation wizard against the guests.

    Your almost-end goal is this:

    Guest Cluster Staging

    After this, the only thing left is to put the two guests in a cluster.


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/


    • Bearbeitet Eric Siron Freitag, 12. Juli 2013 18:45 edit
    • Als Antwort vorgeschlagen VR38DETTMVP Samstag, 13. Juli 2013 20:00
    Freitag, 12. Juli 2013 18:44
  • Here's a fantastic post/document by Jose Barreto on how to build a SOFS cluster on a single Hyper-V host. It probably tells you more than you want, but it does go through the whole iSCSI target setup and a lot more: http://blogs.technet.com/b/josebda/archive/2012/08/23/windows-server-2012-scale-out-file-server-for-sql-server-2012-step-by-step-installation.aspx

    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Freitag, 12. Juli 2013 18:54
  • Thanks once again Eric. Nice documentation from that Jose guy, I have some similarities in my lab. I´m running RRAS on Hyper-V host, several NICs, subnets, AD, and after doing SQL cluster (which requires FC), I´m planning to put some System Center producs, like VMM, OM, CM, using that same HA SQL services.

    Anyway, last (I hope) question - what is your recommendation of doing mirrored drive of those 2 SAS disks? Should I do the mirroring inside the Hyper-V host, or with LSI integraded controller. Keep in mind, I have no real RAID controller here. 

     
    Samstag, 13. Juli 2013 08:21
  • I´m having some succsess, but not completely.

    What I did:
    - I added backup network (internal switch) between nodes directly, has nothing to do with my AD network
    - With Server Manager, I connected to Hyper-V host, and partitioned both SAS disks.
    - In Server Manager's File and Storage Services, I succsessfully added iscsi disk from one of SAS disk. If I understand correctly, iscsi disk is vhd, so it makes it itself, right?
    - In both node´s iscsi initiator, I managed to connect to the Hyper-V host, using IP-adresses.
    - I ran cluster validation, and for the first time, it showed me that there is potential cluster disks
    - I created a cluster, but no disks were visible. I created there new disk pool, there for the first time I had an opportunaty to add that disk. But, as soon I ran the disk pool wizard, there was still no disks available. And I kind a lost that disk....

    Also, the question remains, how to handle disk recovery, how I should mirror these 2 SAS first?

    Samstag, 13. Juli 2013 10:57
  • Hmm, I don´t understand, why I don´t see the disks in FCM?

    Here are cluster storage validation test results:

    1 1 {79cc1823-ebac-11e2-93f5-00155dc36304} 60003FF44DC75ADCA6AC76D771F14FDC 7FD5F0F0-3A7D-418C-A6AC-76D771F14FDC MSFT Virtual HD SCSI Disk Device iSCSI Stor Port 3:0:0:0 Microsoft iSCSI Initiator False Disk partition style is GPT. Disk type is BASIC. The physical disk belongs to storage pool DATA. This disk is part of a storage pool that is not suitable for clustering. Pools that are suitable for clustering must have drives on a shared bus, have more than 3 drives and have no virtual disks configured for thin provisioning. 

    The disks are already clustered and currently Online in the cluster. When testing a working cluster, ensure that the disks that you want to test are Offline in the cluster.

    Samstag, 13. Juli 2013 12:59
  • Isn't the LSI integrated controller actually in hardware? Use hardware RAID when available.

    I would make a RAID out of those two and use them as a cluster disk, not a cluster pool. That should straighten everything out.

    The wizard does create the VHD underneath the iSCSI target for you, but there should have been a clear point when it did it.


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Samstag, 13. Juli 2013 15:10
  • Thanks once again Eric. Nice documentation from that Jose guy, I have some similarities in my lab. I´m running RRAS on Hyper-V host, several NICs, subnets, AD, and after doing SQL cluster (which requires FC), I´m planning to put some System Center producs, like VMM, OM, CM, using that same HA SQL services.

    Anyway, last (I hope) question - what is your recommendation of doing mirrored drive of those 2 SAS disks? Should I do the mirroring inside the Hyper-V host, or with LSI integraded controller. Keep in mind, I have no real RAID controller here. 

     
    If you plan to use Storage Spaces then DO NOT configure RAID sets and virtual LUNs. 

    StarWind iSCSI SAN & NAS

    Samstag, 13. Juli 2013 20:10
  • Isn't the LSI integrated controller actually in hardware? Use hardware RAID when available.

    LSI controller is integrated to the motherboard, so it is so called "fake RAID". I notice, that when importinting disks in FCM to a pool, I also have a selection to select mirroring mode there, maybe I should use that one? At least recovery process would be easier? 

    The VHD creation process is during the iscsi disk creation, in Service Manager Dashboard. But when I create a disk pool in FCM, and I get selection of a proper disk, after the wizard, disks are not shown in FCM, that´s my current problem right now... any ideas?

    Sonntag, 14. Juli 2013 09:55
  • If there is a chip or chipset on the motherboard for RAID, then that is very real. You'll want to use it because it offloads the RAID operations from the OS and CPU.

    Don't create a disk pool at all. Once both nodes have an iSCSI connection, have one node bring it online, format it, etc., then just add it as a cluster disk. Disk pools are not useful in your configuration.


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Sonntag, 14. Juli 2013 16:31
  • Thanks Eric for support once again, I managed finally setup FailOver Cluster on Hyper-V with proper storages.

    These steps were taken:

    1. An already mirrored disk was formated in Hyper-V host.
    2. In Server Manager Dashboard, via Fail Storage services, iScsi vhd was created.
    3. At both nodes, with scsi initator, nodes were connected to that disk
    4. A disk was formated at Node 1
    5. Disk was discovered in FCM


    Dienstag, 16. Juli 2013 19:57
  • Thanks Eric for support once again, I managed finally setup FailOver Cluster on Hyper-V with proper storages.

    These steps were taken:

    1. An already mirrored disk was formated in Hyper-V host.
    2. In Server Manager Dashboard, via Fail Storage services, iScsi vhd was created.
    3. At both nodes, with scsi initator, nodes were connected to that disk
    4. A disk was formated at Node 1
    5. Disk was discovered in FCM



    Damn this is a good memo, I´m starting all over again and this become a use. Only now I don´t want to handle mirror on hardware level, I want to do it within the OS. Should I use storage pool in Hyper-V host, do I gain anything?
    Mittwoch, 18. Dezember 2013 21:03
  • Better memo from the scratch:

    1. Create new volume on hyper-v host (may use maximum physical space)
    2. Create new unique iscsi disk on hyper-v host for cluster use. Connect to iscsi target group.
    3. On node1 and node2, initiate iscsi target connection to hyper-v host
    4. On Node1, bring disk online, initialaze and create new volume.
    5. Rescan storage on Node1
    6. Bring new disk to cluster.
    7. Assing new cluster disc for cluster role

    Sonntag, 8. Juni 2014 15:24