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Recovery of corrupt ReFS drives

    Question

  • After several normal restarts of my Windows Server 2012 Essentials box. I noted that 5 out of 6 drives that were formatted ReFS were not showing volume labels.  Clicking on the drives produced the error "the volume repair was not successful".  One of these drives was unfortunately the server backup drive.

    I don't know what happened, but now I have had to purchase expensive drive recovery software and a large enough disk to hold whatever files the recovery software was able to locate on the corrupted drives and it's going to take me at least a week to get everything back to normal (the drives were all quite full 3TB drives).

    Never again will I use ReFS.

    Does anyone know of any software that can examine a corrupt ReFS drive and make repairs in place?

    Monday, January 20, 2014 10:51 PM

Answers

  • After several normal restarts of my Windows Server 2012 Essentials box. I noted that 5 out of 6 drives that were formatted ReFS were not showing volume labels.  Clicking on the drives produced the error "the volume repair was not successful".  One of these drives was unfortunately the server backup drive.

    I don't know what happened, but now I have had to purchase expensive drive recovery software and a large enough disk to hold whatever files the recovery software was able to locate on the corrupted drives and it's going to take me at least a week to get everything back to normal (the drives were all quite full 3TB drives).

    Never again will I use ReFS.

    Does anyone know of any software that can examine a corrupt ReFS drive and make repairs in place?

    Sorry to hear about your situation. In general it's considered a bad practice to keep both primary data and backup on the same host: human error, virus or hardware issue is going to bring down both primary and disaster recovery sites data as you have one site (host). Exactly what happened to you!

    Back to your issue. Proper way to go would be recovering from backup but as you don't have a backup then you'll have to get data back parsing file system meta data left untouch. There are bunch of apps parsing ReFS or doing generic search (based on file signature and header processing), see below. But I'd leave this task to professionals. IMHO.

    See:

    ReFS recovery

    http://www.reclaime.com/library/refs-recovery.aspx

    Interesting disclaimer directly on site:

    Note to early adopters

    Based on experience with the other filesystems, probably you should not trust your data to ReFS until at least the end of 2013. By that time, the others will have experienced all the possible errors and failures, and most likely you will get pretty bug-free filesystem.

    Also see:

    Data Recovery

    http://www.r-tt.com/

    More ReFS Recovery

    http://www.windowsrecoverysoftware.org/refs-data.html

    Hope this helped a bit :) Good luck!


    StarWind VSAN [Virtual SAN] clusters Hyper-V without SAS, Fibre Channel, SMB 3.0 or iSCSI, uses Ethernet to mirror internally mounted SATA disks between hosts.

    • Marked as answer by SloPoke Tuesday, January 21, 2014 7:42 PM
    Tuesday, January 21, 2014 11:18 AM

All replies

  • After several normal restarts of my Windows Server 2012 Essentials box. I noted that 5 out of 6 drives that were formatted ReFS were not showing volume labels.  Clicking on the drives produced the error "the volume repair was not successful".  One of these drives was unfortunately the server backup drive.

    I don't know what happened, but now I have had to purchase expensive drive recovery software and a large enough disk to hold whatever files the recovery software was able to locate on the corrupted drives and it's going to take me at least a week to get everything back to normal (the drives were all quite full 3TB drives).

    Never again will I use ReFS.

    Does anyone know of any software that can examine a corrupt ReFS drive and make repairs in place?

    Sorry to hear about your situation. In general it's considered a bad practice to keep both primary data and backup on the same host: human error, virus or hardware issue is going to bring down both primary and disaster recovery sites data as you have one site (host). Exactly what happened to you!

    Back to your issue. Proper way to go would be recovering from backup but as you don't have a backup then you'll have to get data back parsing file system meta data left untouch. There are bunch of apps parsing ReFS or doing generic search (based on file signature and header processing), see below. But I'd leave this task to professionals. IMHO.

    See:

    ReFS recovery

    http://www.reclaime.com/library/refs-recovery.aspx

    Interesting disclaimer directly on site:

    Note to early adopters

    Based on experience with the other filesystems, probably you should not trust your data to ReFS until at least the end of 2013. By that time, the others will have experienced all the possible errors and failures, and most likely you will get pretty bug-free filesystem.

    Also see:

    Data Recovery

    http://www.r-tt.com/

    More ReFS Recovery

    http://www.windowsrecoverysoftware.org/refs-data.html

    Hope this helped a bit :) Good luck!


    StarWind VSAN [Virtual SAN] clusters Hyper-V without SAS, Fibre Channel, SMB 3.0 or iSCSI, uses Ethernet to mirror internally mounted SATA disks between hosts.

    • Marked as answer by SloPoke Tuesday, January 21, 2014 7:42 PM
    Tuesday, January 21, 2014 11:18 AM
  • Thanks, ReclaiMe is the one I'm using.  It's taking several days to recover everything, but it looks like it will be successful.  I've even managed to recover my backup drive.

    No more ReFS for me.  I've never had a problem this extensive with NTFS.

    Tuesday, January 21, 2014 7:42 PM
  • Thanks, ReclaiMe is the one I'm using.  It's taking several days to recover everything, but it looks like it will be successful.  I've even managed to recover my backup drive.

    No more ReFS for me.  I've never had a problem this extensive with NTFS.

    Great you're doing good! No file system is a trusted one - keep as many replicas of your critical data as you can. It DOES pay back. Good luck!

    StarWind VSAN [Virtual SAN] clusters Hyper-V without SAS, Fibre Channel, SMB 3.0 or iSCSI, uses Ethernet to mirror internally mounted SATA disks between hosts.

    Tuesday, January 21, 2014 10:04 PM
  • How did you go... I just had a client I was changing the order of the Hyper-V replications to the new A-B-C for S2012 R2 and I rebooted the Hyper-V server and the whole Virtual Hard Disk folder is gone. Every VHD gone!

    I am using Reclaim Me but will take a few more hours for the files to have copied. Then I hope they are all intact!!!

    Thursday, January 23, 2014 12:46 PM
  • Did you ever find out why the Virtual Hard Disks folder was lost? I have the same issue, but would like to know the Root cause.
    Monday, March 17, 2014 5:54 PM