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Do not have permission to create files in Windows Drive

    Question

  • I have recently installed windows 8 Pro.

    I am using Firefox for browsing. Now, while I wanted to print a webpage as PDF doc in C: Drive it gives me error you do not have permissions to create files.

    While this is my personal laptop and in that only my account is there. Admin is also disabled by default. My account is also administrator privileges; though I am unable to print PDF doc in C: - System drive.

    And even I cannot create any file in C: Drive and even unable to extract any zip file which creates folder in program files.

    Please help me. Its very rude than Windows 7.

    Thanks in advance.


    Sunday, September 29, 2013 4:49 PM

Answers

  • What can I tell you? I had a similar problem with Vista Ultimate a few years ago when I first used Vista. What I did was go to the <C> drive and set full permissions for User\machinename\user and that solved the  permission issues on Vista. As I recall, I had to wipeout the machine's HD and reinstall Vista for an unrelated issue, and I never had to go back and set permissions on the User\machinename\user.

    When I did the set of  User\machinename\user permissions to full rights, there was no account there like your SwamiShriji there. It was just Administrator, Systems and Users\machinename\User accounts on the C:. Maybe SwamiShriji is creating issues for you now, and you need to get rid of it.

    You could try to change ownership of <C> away from the TrustedInstaller account, but that's probably going to cause issues with Windows update and other installers.

    I am using Win 7 pro and Windows 8 pro, and I am using the out of the box setup with the permissions for Administrator, System and Users\machinename\user with Users not having write access to <C>. I don't have the issues you are facing with permissions on the <C> drive.

    If you can go to <C> and create a "new folder" with SwamiShriji permissions on <C> to write, then there is something else running on the machine that is stopping you from writing files to <C> beyond what UAC would be doing to stop you from writing files to protected areas on <C>. 

    There is also the protection feature on those O/S(s) that is going to stop you from writing files to <C> for files coming from a foreign source like files being downloaded from a Web site.

     
    Monday, September 30, 2013 9:56 PM

All replies

  • <copied from post>

    While this is my personal laptop and in that only my account is there. Admin is also disabled by default. My account is also administrator privileges; though I am unable to print PDF doc in C: - System drive.

    <end>

    No,  your user admin account is not using admin privileges at the desktop, which you must escalate privileges using UAC to use the Admin token for your user admin account to have admin privileges. 

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc709691(v=ws.10).aspx

    <copied>

    Unlike earlier versions of Windows, when an administrator logs on to a computer running Windows 7 or Windows Vista, the user’s full administrator access token is split into two access tokens: a full administrator access token and a standard user access token. During the logon process, authorization and access control components that identify an administrator are removed, resulting in a standard user access token. The standard user access token is then used to start the desktop, the Explorer.exe process. Because all applications inherit their access control data from the initial launch of the desktop, they all run as a standard user.

    <end>

    The above applies to Windows 8 too.

    <copied from post>

    And even I cannot create any file in C: Drive and even unable to extract any zip file which creates folder in program files.

    <end>

    Nope, you can't be putting any files into the C:\Programs File or C:\Windows. They are protected areas on Windows 8 just like on Vista and Win 7, and the O/S is going to stop you, particularly so since you are using the Standard user token at the desktop.

    http://blogs.windows.com/windows/archive/b/developers/archive/2009/08/04/user-account-control-data-redirection.aspx

    <copied>

    Today, many applications are still designed to write files to the Program Files, Windows directories, or system root (typically the C drive) folders. Some applications are designed to update Microsoft® Windows registry values, specifically values in HKLM/Software. But there is one problem: the files or registry values are not created or updated. You may ask, “What’s going on? My application goes through the code and does not report an error. So where are my files?”

    To be specific, you may experience one or more of the following symptoms:

    • Your application writes to Program Files, Windows directories, or the system root (typically the C drive) folders, but you can't find your files in these locations

    <end>

    And in your case OP, you are flat out being stopped period from writing files to the protected areas, and it also  applies to Windows 8 too. The files are not being redirected, and you are just flat out being stopped from putting files in the protected areas.

    With what you are trying to do, you can't even get away with it with Vista or Win 7, let alone trying to do it with Win 8. So I don't know how you think Win 8 is rude when Vista and Win 7 are just as rude. :)

    It's not to say that your user admin account is not an admin account, and in some situation where you are using your user admin account to administer the O/S, your user admin account is admin. On the other hand even as admin in the administration of the O/S with your user admin account, that UAC prompt has popped asking to escalate privileges. I am sure you have seen it. However, there are a lot of times like 100% of the time at the desktop or running a program from the desktop, your user admin account is not admin,  and the program doesn't have admin privileges. It only has Standard user privileges, unless UAC has stepped in to escalate privileges to the Aamin token .

    There is only one account on Vista, Win 7 and Win 8 that is the root admin account that is using the Admin token at all times.

    http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-vista/enable-the-hidden-administrator-account-on-windows-vista/

    You should use the account sparingly and stay off the Internet using the account, which would leave the machine wide open to attack even though UAC would probably take some protection measures.

    Sunday, September 29, 2013 9:18 PM
  • I know most users want to do what they want, but there are some restriction.

    And the restriction is not implemented just for the sake of restriction.

    It's implemented for the sake of security, if you don't want any inconvenience and don't care about security.

    Enabled the default Admin and used it as your account, disabled UAC and you will be able to do what you want but the computer will be vulnerable to attack and viruses.

    But that's what users want; convenience and less security, there is always a trade off. It's your call and it's your own device anyway.

    Good luck!!


    Every second counts..make use of it. Disclaimer: This posting is provided AS IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

    Monday, September 30, 2013 2:59 AM
  • <copied>

    Enabled the default Admin and used it as your account, disabled UAC and you will be able to do what you want but the computer will be vulnerable to attack and viruses.

    But that's what users want; convenience and less security, there is always a trade off. It's your call and it's your own device anyway.

    <end>

    Yeah, it's called "drop your linen and keep on grinnin"!

    They can get out the "drop your linen and keep on grinnin" play book too that's been around for many years, which most never followed the playbook not knowing how bad the O/S was compromised with their personal information exposed. 

    Yeah they run some snake-oil solution and AV hollering about this.  I am clean! I am clean!  But in the mean time, the compromise is hollering this. You missed me!  You missed me!  I am still here hidden,  and I dropped off some offspring too! I am still right in your face with baggage!  

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc700813.aspx

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc512595.aspx

    If the user wants to drop their linen and grin, the Windows XP and prior versions of the Windows O/S before XP are there to expose their John Brown behind parts. So why use the newer O/S(s) that knows how to protect themselves and then configure them to enable the same old bad user habits?   

    Monday, September 30, 2013 4:17 AM
  • Thank you. But I actually needed summary not big picture. Though you helped me. Just change account type from standard to administrator in first link.
    Monday, September 30, 2013 5:19 AM
  • <copied>

    Thank you. But I actually needed summary not big picture. Though you helped me. Just change account type from standard to administrator in first link.

    <end>

    You have not learned a thing. The only way you can do what you are talking about is to logon with the root-admin account and run out to the Internet and get the machine hacked/compromised and yourself hacked.  That's what you are talking about, and you have stopped the O/S from cutting down the attack vector. You might as well not even be on Windows 8, and should continue to run on XP  with your linen dropped and grinnin on every click of the mouse.  :) Please proceed and O'LAY!

    Monday, September 30, 2013 5:48 AM
  • Img1 in C: created from administrator account. And error message was in "SwamiShriji" account while creating a simple text file in C: drive. Provide me solution in short if u have any. Thanks in advance.

    Monday, September 30, 2013 5:51 AM
  • I changed the my account type from standard to administrator. I could create one file in C drive in admin account but unable to create in my acc even its administrator. Please check this therad's attached images I replied to one of person. Thanks. provide me if u have any sol.
    Monday, September 30, 2013 5:54 AM

  • I changed the my account type from standard to administrator. I could create one file in C drive in admin account but unable to create in my acc even its administrator. Please check this therad's attached images I replied to one of person. Thanks. provide me if u have any sol.
    Monday, September 30, 2013 5:54 AM
  • Hi, I learned a lot from you. Thus I attached two images also as u explained in a bug picture. Still I am not successful in creating a simple text file in C drive. Help me if u have any solution for this @darnold924


    Monday, September 30, 2013 6:06 AM
  • Please check attached images I posted of my windows 8 current situation.
    Monday, September 30, 2013 6:11 AM
  • Its my personal laptop. That's why I at-least want to create file in C: drive during development sometimes.
    Monday, September 30, 2013 6:13 AM
  • Its my personal laptop. That's why I at-least want to create file in C: drive during development sometimes.

    right click on c drive, click on properties.

    on security tab put your user account name, set the rights to full.

    :)


    Every second counts..make use of it. Disclaimer: This posting is provided AS IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

    Monday, September 30, 2013 10:19 AM
  • @cguan I already did this. It shows full control for my username in properties/security. Still I don't have rights to create a file in C: drive.
    Monday, September 30, 2013 11:11 AM
  • @darnold924 Please note that from the images I attached. I am not a standard user right now. I am administrator after all. Its not displaying "Full Administrator Token" or "Standard User Token" to be.
    Monday, September 30, 2013 11:16 AM
  • @darnold924 I already did it months ago. Though I am giving u an image to show -
    Monday, September 30, 2013 12:38 PM
  •  I am going to give you this simple example. Larry account has full control on C: Jeff account has full control on C: Everyone account on C: has read, execute and List only. If Larry or Jeff account tries to write a file to C:, the Everyone account is going to stop the write, because it permissions don't match Larry or Jeff. The Everyone account doesn't have write permissions, and Everyone is superseding/overriding the permissions of the other two accounts on C: It's right there in the screen shot you posted. Users(Home\User) does NOT have the same permissions as SwamiShriji. SwamiShriji is a member of the Users(Home\User) account too, and the two accounts DO NOT have the same permissions. Users(Home\User) I am sure doesn't have write permissions, and Users(Home\User) is superseding/overriding SwamiShriji's permissions. You can get rid of SwamiShriji, because it is implied that SwamiShriji is a member of Users(Home\User) and you just set full control on Users(Home\User). The only problem is that if your wife has an account on your machine, then her account would have full permissions on C:, because you have set Users(Home\User) to have full control that allows all users logged on to the machine to have full control on C:
    Monday, September 30, 2013 1:46 PM
  • Avatar of darnold924

    darnold924

    Still confused. Check the latest image also. This image setting is also long a month ago.

    Monday, September 30, 2013 2:28 PM
  • What can I tell you? I had a similar problem with Vista Ultimate a few years ago when I first used Vista. What I did was go to the <C> drive and set full permissions for User\machinename\user and that solved the  permission issues on Vista. As I recall, I had to wipeout the machine's HD and reinstall Vista for an unrelated issue, and I never had to go back and set permissions on the User\machinename\user.

    When I did the set of  User\machinename\user permissions to full rights, there was no account there like your SwamiShriji there. It was just Administrator, Systems and Users\machinename\User accounts on the C:. Maybe SwamiShriji is creating issues for you now, and you need to get rid of it.

    You could try to change ownership of <C> away from the TrustedInstaller account, but that's probably going to cause issues with Windows update and other installers.

    I am using Win 7 pro and Windows 8 pro, and I am using the out of the box setup with the permissions for Administrator, System and Users\machinename\user with Users not having write access to <C>. I don't have the issues you are facing with permissions on the <C> drive.

    If you can go to <C> and create a "new folder" with SwamiShriji permissions on <C> to write, then there is something else running on the machine that is stopping you from writing files to <C> beyond what UAC would be doing to stop you from writing files to protected areas on <C>. 

    There is also the protection feature on those O/S(s) that is going to stop you from writing files to <C> for files coming from a foreign source like files being downloaded from a Web site.

     
    Monday, September 30, 2013 9:56 PM