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Windows Server 2008 R2 - Bypass Configuring Updates During Power Outage

    Question

  • This is, to me, a fairly simple concept with an infrequent but likely scenario.

    A company server running Windows Server 2008 R2 (or 2012) is running on a UPS.   It may, or may not, have the Hyper-V role with virtualized servers running IIS and other services.

    1. Windows Update has already installed updates but there is a pending reboot.

    2. There is a power outage and the server is running on a UPS with maybe 10-30 minutes of runtime.

    3. There needs to be a way to bypass the "Configuring Updates" process during shutdown (and do it at next boot instead) in this scenario.      This is greatly compounded if Hyper-V is hosting virtual machines.

    My research thus far has indicated that this concept is not achievable (if this is incorrect, please direct me to the solution!), which is pretty shocking to me as a programmer dealing with 'what if' scenarios.

    The current "solution" is to only do manual installations of Windows Update but there are several problems with that solution:

    1. It does not scale.

    2. The UPS/power failure can still occur during the reboot.

    Tuesday, July 23, 2013 9:23 PM

Answers

  • You can't  bypass this as the install are pending the cleanup.

    On a personal note I always do it manually, never automatic for a server. Yes it does not scale easilly, but you don't want to play with the risk, what if the backup is not good, would you run the update ? or fix the backup first ? if hosted on a hypervisor, take a snapshot before ?, etc..

    For the point #2, take a bigger UPS :-) In site that the power cut often during the day, it's not unusual that I seen UPS runtime remeaning of 3h and more.


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    Wednesday, July 24, 2013 1:41 AM
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