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Is Steadystate supposed to work with Windows 7?

    Question

  •  

    I just installed Windows 7 and wanted to put in place max security before running other programs and downloading software.  I tried to down load SteadyState but it does not seem to want to let me install it.  It claims Windows 7 is an unrecognised operating System.

     

    Any one else tried to install Steadystate with the new Windows 7?

    Sunday, January 18, 2009 6:31 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    SteadyState is not compatible with Windows 7.

    Thanks,
    Rob Elmer
    Development Lead
    Windows SteadyState
    Sunday, January 18, 2009 8:32 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    SteadyState is not compatible with Windows 7.

    Thanks,
    Rob Elmer
    Development Lead
    Windows SteadyState
    Sunday, January 18, 2009 8:32 PM
  • Thanks!  It seems that several other utilities won't work with Windows 7 yet.  For example I can't install the software for my printer HP c6180.  I guess it will be a while before all the needed software is ready.
    Sunday, January 18, 2009 11:21 PM
  • Will there be a beta available for Windows 7?  We currently have SteadyState deployed to around 1300 computers and are looking to begin deploying a pilot of Windows 7.

     

    Thanks,

     

    Eric

     

    Monday, January 26, 2009 9:03 PM
  •  Rob Elmer [MSFT] wrote:
    Hi,

    SteadyState is not compatible with Windows 7.

    Thanks,
    Rob Elmer
    Development Lead
    Windows SteadyState

     

    Mr. Elmer:

     

    If I may bother you with another Windows 7 beta (W7) related question.

     

    I want to create a dual boot OS to evaluate W7.  I'm currently running Vista SP1.  If I use the Shrink command and then create a second partition to install W7 on, can I later delete W7 and the second partition and use the Expand function to recover my current partition to its original size?

     

    Thank you in advance for any advice you may have in this matter.

     

    Respectfully submitted,

    Robert Goltz

    Tuesday, January 27, 2009 2:17 AM
  • Looks like PC Safeguard is not a SteadyState replacement.  Will SteadyState continue to be developed for Windows 7 to protect domain joined PCs?

    Eric
    Eric
    Tuesday, March 03, 2009 10:44 PM
  • Please update SteadyState to be compatible with Windows 7 and a 64-bit version as well. PC Safeguard does not offer everything SteadyState does. I can't believe MS is not commiting of making a compatible version available in the future.
    Anonymuos
    Wednesday, March 11, 2009 3:32 PM
  • Can you please provide some information about your company, current WSS implementation, and expected timeline for Win7 upgrade?
    Will you consider upgrading to Win7 without WSS support?

    As Rob said, currently there is no Win7 support in WSS. This request for information does not mean Win7 support is coming, but I am trying to assess the need.

    Thank you for your help!

    ~Eyal T.
    Microsoft PM

    Wednesday, July 01, 2009 1:39 AM
  • We use SteadyState on 1500 Windows XP machines in student computing labs.  We are planning on upgrading to Windows 7 once it is RTM.  Not sure what we are going to do with the student computing labs if there is no disk protection.  Win7 and deep freeze possibly but not the road we would like to go down.  All of our management scripts are configured for WSS.
    Eric
    Wednesday, July 01, 2009 1:48 AM
  • Which school? What country/state? (for demographics...)

    Thanks for the into! this is geat help for me.
    Wednesday, July 01, 2009 1:50 AM
  • University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire

    Do you know if there will be any beta program or focus group on WSS?  Feel free to email me with any info or any other questions.
    Eric
    Wednesday, July 01, 2009 1:58 AM
  • The Newfoundland & Labrador Public Libraries, Newfoundland, Canada currently run Steady State on 650+ Library Computer systems.  We are looking at upgrading the systems from Windows XP to Windows 7.  If Steady State does not work on Windows 7, we have no choice but to stay with Windows XP.

    Please make Steady State available for this new Operating System.

    Thanks,
    Matt Tavenor
    Friday, July 10, 2009 3:41 PM
  • Any word on this?  Is it still a possiblilty or not?  We would love to know if we need to loo at alternativess like Deep Freeze.  We would like to roll Win 7 as soon as possible but SteadyState or something similar is a requirement. 
    Eric
    • Proposed as answer by fairlane32 Monday, August 03, 2009 7:42 PM
    Monday, August 03, 2009 6:59 PM
  • Long Island public librarian with only my measly 22 computers. (LOL - 650 pc's, WOW!) I concur with Eric though, I use WinXP on my public machines with SS and deep freeze, but we also use Time and Print management software (Comprises' Sam) and would love to update to Win 7 and SS. (I'm sure Comprise will support win 7, but they are slooooow) Even so, I also have about another 20 staff machines that I will definitely be upgrading to Win 7 Enterprise edition, when it comes out. x64 is what I'd like to use too, but we will see.

    Philip :)

    Jealousy is not proof of love, nor proof of emotional immaturity
    Monday, August 03, 2009 7:42 PM
  • The Euclid Public Library in Ohio also uses Steady State on 60+ computers for public use and a few for staff use.  We are also ready to move from Win XP  to Win 7 as soon as possible but would delay the upgrade if Steady State wasn't available.  I know we are also a drop in the bucket but I believe there are alot of places like ours which use this product and would like to see a Win 7 compatible version.  Thanks in advance for your consideration to an update! 

    Patrick
    Tuesday, August 04, 2009 3:01 PM
  • Just discovering WSS.  Looking to upgrade the iNet cafes in all of our banks to W7 with WSS.  Current solution is a old 2k with poledit - very cumbersome.  Please advise when there is a beta available.  We'll happily jump on board.  Until then we'll consider XP or Vista, but it seems wasteful to spend time with old OS's. 
    Thursday, August 13, 2009 6:04 PM
  • Eyal,

    We currently use SteadyState on over 225 Public Computers across our Library System and are also looking to update to W7.  In addition to basic Operating System Support as the others have requested, we would like to know how to leverage its capabilities more in an AD environment.  Is there a resource that would enable us to more fully utilize the product?

    Thank you,

    Will
    Lexington Public Library
    Lexington, KY
    Friday, August 14, 2009 1:09 AM
  • Can we get any news on when W7 support is coming? a few months maybe? *optimistic smiley*
    Or should we be looking into alternative solutions because it will take a loooong time?

    btw I just realzed that "Guest Mode" is gone :(
    Sunday, August 23, 2009 7:16 PM
  • I had just received notice that currently there is no plan for SteadyState to be developed for Windows 7 :(  Good news for Faronics I suppose.
    Eric
    Monday, September 14, 2009 6:20 PM
  • Received notice from whom? I can't see how they can't support it, the demand is so great.

    Philip
    Jealousy is not proof of love, nor proof of emotional immaturity
    Monday, September 14, 2009 8:50 PM
  • A contact with Microsoft
    Eric
    Monday, September 14, 2009 9:34 PM
  • That's pretty lame if it is true. You go and tell your contact that if they don't I shall unleash SkyNET upon Redmond!!!

    Jealousy is not proof of love, nor proof of emotional immaturity
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009 6:45 PM
  • will it be suported ? im waiting for the info , 200 pc , xp to 7 still on halt . please email me at adamramadhan@live.com if u have time thanks .
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009 11:16 PM
  • @Eric:
    I checked the date and it is not April 1... Stop making bad jokes :S

    btw The technology behind StadyState was supposed to be integrated into Windows 7 Guest Mode... But it didn't make into the RTM... However it was present in the Beta.
    Also from that site:
    "Related: I'm also told that Microsoft will not be releasing a Windows 7 variant of the Steady State/Shared Computer Toolkit any time soon to compensate. (Guest Mode was based on this technology.) That doesn't mean that one won't happen eventually. But it's not in the schedule right now."
    Wednesday, September 16, 2009 1:51 AM
  • Well I guess at this point nobody knows for sure. I for one hope they decide to support Win7. Otherwise all us library system admins will be running XP or (god forbid) Vista until a comparable tool comes out for Win 7.

    *sigh*
    Jealousy is not proof of love, nor proof of emotional immaturity
    Wednesday, September 16, 2009 3:37 PM
  • I wasn't joking...from the email:

    Hi Eric,

     

    I have confirmed with the PG that at this time, there are no plans to offer a SteadyState version for Windows 7.

     

    Thanks,

    ****


    Eric
    Wednesday, September 16, 2009 3:45 PM
  • I managed to instal SteadyState 2.5 on 32 bit Windows 7 RC 7100 [by using compatibility mode for Vista SP1], however when i activated Disk Protection SteadyState would rebbot Windows as usual but on restart reported Disk Protection was not on .
    If/when i tried to remove it said i had to turn off disc protection first ???[when GUI says off]........i couldnt do a system restore due to the Disc Protection thing either .....ended up reinstalling from an Image of Partition.

    I had assumed this to be sorted by a SteadyState update to say 2.6 or 3.0 on Windows 7's release this Fall......Not So It Seems

    Disapointing MS
    Sunday, September 27, 2009 7:31 PM
  • This crazy!!!  How can Microsoft not being developing a new version of SteadyState for Windows 7?

    Tons of schools and businesses depend on Windows SteadyState and are waiting on Windows 7 before upgrade equipment.

    So what if we get the new computers we are budgeted for?  What do we do?  On October 22nd the only OS is Windows 7.


    Lance
    Monday, October 05, 2009 9:58 PM
  • I think you will have to look at other product like deep freeze from Faronics http://www.faronics.com/html/deepfreeze.asp but it will cost you something! SteadyState is a free product. Probably they don't want to put money in a free software. Nothing force you to use Windows 7. If you buy a new computer with windows 7, you can downgrade to Win xp IF you have the wright version of Win7. Check your license to be Professsional or Enterprise.

    For up to date info on licensing go there :
    http://www.microsoftvolumelicensing.com/userights/ i'm not a license specialist

    a)    Downgrade.  The licensed user may run a prior version in place of the licensed version for any copy run.  This right to run a prior version is in addition to the right to run the product version you licensed.  The licensed user may run both versions at the same time.

    Me too wish to have a working version with Vista 64 bit and win7! I will use XP as long as I can because we don't need win7 to surf the web in an Internet cafe, then I will look at the option at this time.

    Wednesday, October 07, 2009 3:42 PM
  • Well, this is a disappointment to be sure.  We are just in the process of evaluating SteadyState for our XP machines now (we are in a medical environment).  When I read about PC safeguard for Win 7, I was quite pleased with the feature set...until MS decided against it.

    This will slow down our adoption of win 7.  Please reconsider and bring back PC Safeguard or upgrade Steady State for Win 7.  We use 300+ PC's here, and it would save the IT department some work.

    Thank you.

    Saturday, October 10, 2009 4:52 AM
  • The steadystate functionality I use with 200+ public computers is not the hard drive protection, but rather the policies to lock the computer down.  I suppose those same policies will be available with Windows 7?

    Monday, October 19, 2009 3:13 PM
  • Are you using Vista now? If so, I wonder if they would be the same and behave OK with SS on Win7. Why don't you try it and let us know?  ;)

    Philip

    Jealousy is not proof of love, nor proof of emotional immaturity
    Tuesday, October 20, 2009 7:20 PM
  • Yes. Same or similar policies are available for Win-7. Please read the documentation to find out more.

    Eyal Tropen
    WSS PM
    Microsoft
    Tuesday, October 20, 2009 9:16 PM
  • SteadyState does not currently work with Win7. Trying to force-install, such as with compatibility mode, may result in need to format and re-install the hard drive.

    Please do not try this!

    Eyal Tropen
    WSS PM
    Microsoft
    Tuesday, October 20, 2009 9:18 PM
  • I do IT support for a large consortium of libraries in western Colorado. I maintain approximately 500+ public computers that use SteadyState. Many of our libraries have been avoiding Vista due to performance issues, but would like to move up to Windows 7. I'd like to see SteadyState be updated for Win7 support, even if it's just for the disk protection.

    Sean H.
    Sean Hanson
    Thursday, October 22, 2009 1:25 AM
  • I like so many of the other posters work in a Public Library with 150 public access PC's. I currently use MS toolkit and Deepfreeze to lock down our Win XP systems.  My Library is also part of a consortum who's members also use Toolkit and SS to lockdown their PC's.   If Microsoft does not provide the same lockdown capabilities as Toolkit/SS then we will NOT be move over to Win 7.   We will instead look at going to Linux.  

    Dumb move by Microsoft.

    Gary Welte
    San Mateo Public Library
    Thursday, October 22, 2009 4:31 PM
  • Hello Rob

    Is there a document posted somewhere that would list all the setting used by either MS toolkit, or SteadyState uses to lock down the PC's that could be applied in a AD enviroment.   I have just started the process of setting up a DC, and would like to secure our Public Access Computers via GPO that would give me the same lockdown enviroment as the MS Toolkit/SteadyState.  I am sure it can be done, I just have no idea where to find all the settings.

    Gary Welte
    Thursday, October 22, 2009 4:46 PM
  • Hello Rob

    Is there a document posted somewhere that would list all the setting used by either MS toolkit, or SteadyState uses to lock down the PC's that could be applied in a AD enviroment.   I have just started the process of setting up a DC, and would like to secure our Public Access Computers via GPO that would give me the same lockdown enviroment as the MS Toolkit/SteadyState.  I am sure it can be done, I just have no idea where to find all the settings.

    Gary Welte

    Some sort of documentation would be wonderful, since searching on this subject brings up a lot of administrative tears on the removal of this critical tool from the Windows Ecosystem.

    Even if this is handled in the GPO, it would still be overly cumbersome for something like this.  I have used SteadyState to deploy touchscreen kiosks that run on seperate networks from the rest of the company's mission critical systems, to ensure any sort of penetration would result in a jailed environ.

    I'd prefer to continue using MS products for this, but I'm beginning to wonder if KDE's kiosk mode isn't going to be a better choice now.  Any direction on this matter would be appreciated.
    Friday, October 23, 2009 7:53 PM
  • FWIW, +1 on the administrative tears for removing SteadyState from Win7...
    Monday, October 26, 2009 6:27 PM
  • We are a small public library that also relies on steady state to secure our 27 public Internet stations (primarily for the policies as we don't use the disk protection feature).  We have no tech staff and this program really helps us keep our machines online and available for the public.  The Gates Foundation gave us comptuers and trained us on the programs which were precursors of steady state.  For us non-techies there is a certain comfort level and confidence in using a product from Microsoft.  We would appreciate it if Microsoft would reconsider developing this for Windows 7.  Even if a vendor does step up and develop something - in this economic climate with our budgets getting cut repeatedly we may not be able to pay for it.  This will result in libraries providing outdated programs and reduced functionality to our communities.
    Katie
    Saturday, October 31, 2009 1:06 PM
  • As an alternative to a paid service, I too, would like to see development of a Windows 7 compatible version.

    Microsoft wants to push for Enterprise deployment of Windows 7, yet doesn't want to support a Windows 7 compatible SteadyState? Uh, ok...

    Tuesday, November 03, 2009 4:45 PM
  • Please update SteadyState to support Windows 7 Microsoft!

    I rely on it heavily for my job.

    Thanks,

    David
    Wednesday, November 18, 2009 1:17 PM
  • I encourage you to develop SteadyState compatible with Windows 7.  People are going to resist upgrading to the new OS.  Known issues with Vista keep organizations like mine running XP.  We are a private university with over 200 student lab computers which we secure with SteadyState.  We have 500+ computers in use by faculty and staff which we do not run SteadyState on, but we are not going to upgrade the OS on any of our systems and we will continue to purchase new systems with XP downgrade until we are able to uniformly deploy 7 throughout our entire enterprise.  The one and only roadblock to this is the absence of SteadyState for our lab computers.  We absolutely will not invest in another security solution just to use Windows 7 when XP and SteadyState work fine.

    Put this through to your people who want to sell Windows 7:  SteadyState is needed to sell it.

    Thursday, November 19, 2009 2:22 PM
  • Who is the customer (at least classification of size and industry)? Number of work stations?
    We are a library system, we have ~500 computers in 40+ libraries most computers (all but 5 or 10) are running XP.

    Domain or Workgroup users?
    We currently have workgroups for all the libraries and a domain at headquarters, but if there was domain integration for something like WSS we would use it here at headquarters and recommend it for the larger libraries.

    Is the customer currently using WSS?
    We are currently testing it and considering recommending it for those using XP as a replacement for Deep Freeze

    What is the risk in not supporting WSS with Win-7?
    We will have to consider holding off on upgrading to Win 7, or recommend that the libaries spend their limited monies on Deep Freeze (which is not as convenient as WSS

    Which specific WSS features will be used and how?
    We mainly need to have a locked down profile that will allow patrons to plug in flashdrives, ipods, etc and work on whatever they need to, then have any changes go away when they reboot. Being able to force patrons to use a proxy (without having to directly edit Group Policy) would be good as well.
    In our testing so far the librarians have commented that "Our computer update person finds Steady State easy to use & prefers it to Deep Freeze"

    In short, WSS (or the equivalent) is a "must have" for us to move to Win 7.   Without it we will be stuck with DeepFreeze or XP

    Aaron Z
    Pioneer Library System
    Canandaigua, New York
    • Proposed as answer by cwit_mike Sunday, November 22, 2009 4:08 AM
    Thursday, November 19, 2009 9:19 PM
  • Didin't mean to propose As Answer on above. Clicked the wrong button...

    Anyways. We too were faced with a dilema, 1200 public access workstations using the EWF from the first version "Shared Computer Toolkit". Ths allowed us to develop our software around some excellent framework and focus on what we do best.

    Windows 7 comes along and due to XP going end of Life soon we are faced with converting over. Sad to see that we cannot use SteadyState, even more depressed no plans to upgrade it either.

    I was forced to get a version of FBWF working on Windows 7 and then move on to creating Local Policies to control the Security. We have a  workgroup environment for all systems seperated by up to 3000 kms.

    If You do some searching you'll find what you are looking for. Moving to Deepfreeze would a massive expense for us, not even a consideration.

    Best of Luck all.



    Sunday, November 22, 2009 4:19 AM
  • I'll post my thoughts here as I did in another "support win7" thread. If MS doesn't support SS for Win7, I plan on waiting for Google's ChromeOS. Depending on how the finished product will turn out, I think, and this is only an opinion based on what I've seen what the OS looks like, it would be a good alternative to windows for libraries/schools who roll out pc's for the public. You won't have to worry about securing the machine (the UI is browser based so it's sandboxed) and any updates are done on Google's end. All you would need, if at all, would be some sort of Deep Freeze type reboot to restore (but with no hard drive, you wouldn't need that either, right?). Patrons can store their data in the cloud or on a USB stick. From what I've seen I didn't see any indication of any local access to drives since you really don't need it, especially for a patron pc, where you don't want them saving any data anyway. But again, we'll have to see how the OS plays out in 2010. I'm sure I'm missing something..........

    Jealousy is not proof of love, nor proof of emotional immaturity
    Monday, November 23, 2009 6:51 PM
  • How do you expect us to upgrade our Vista demo/kiosk machines from Vista to Windows 7? (when we NEED and USE SteadyState) 

    Please make a Win7 version of SteadyState, we're not able to "buy" 3rd party software so I'm stuck now. ?? :(

    Tuesday, November 24, 2009 11:55 PM
  • I have the same thing to apply as all the others in the thread. Please make WSS compatible with Windows 7, otherwise we will not upgrade our systems. Is anybody applying this thread to somebody with the right authority's at Microsoft to make this happen?
    Thursday, December 31, 2009 1:31 PM
  • Is there a "Vote As UNHELPFUL" button?

    I signed up for this forum specifically to add my voice: Bring Back SteadyState!

    MSFT is leaving schools and libraries hanging in the breeze!
    Tuesday, January 19, 2010 9:15 PM
  • Is there a "Vote As UNHELPFUL" button?

    I signed up for this forum specifically to add my voice: Bring Back SteadyState!

    MSFT is leaving schools and libraries hanging in the breeze!
    I agree. Though it is hard to say we are owed SteadyState when it was a free product, the amount of development that went into this solution for the benefit of these organizations now seems a waste.

    We've already started the conversion over to Deep Freeze, and we'll have to raise the maintenance charges to our members, as well.



    Sean Hanson
    Tuesday, January 19, 2010 9:40 PM
  • Eric,
    Looking to begin using WSS on some XP SP3 systems and don't want to reinvent the wheel when it comes to WMI scripts for WSS configuration such as setting the date/time that WSS will revert back to initial state.  Actually I'd really like to be able to send a script to install WSS after a re-image job, and then configure WSS for things such as roaming profile deletion and date/time to revert.  All of these are able to be set via GUI but would like to script them as part of an image job.  Any ideas on where I might be able to latch onto some of the scripting logic?

    thanks Allen
    Thursday, January 21, 2010 10:55 PM
  • Just found this on another board:

    "Microsoft made a few quiet but great changes to its kid-proofing SteadyState tool for Windows 7, changing the name to Guest Mode

    This nearly-hidden feature called Guest Mode that is primarily aimed at shared consumer PCs that need to be returned to their original running state after being used by a child or guest. The feature can be enabled on individual user accounts; when user logs off or the PC reboots, those accounts are wiped clean and returned to their original configuration. Guest Mode is useful for small classrooms, libraries, and other shared computing scenarios, but is really designed for home use, where parents may want to configure the feature for their children.

    Guest Mode was originally called PC Safeguard."

    I hope this helps the people that are trying to use SteadyState with Windows 7

    Rob
    Friday, January 22, 2010 2:44 AM
  • Just found this on another board:

    "Microsoft made a few quiet but great changes to its kid-proofing SteadyState tool for Windows 7, changing the name to Guest Mode

    This nearly-hidden feature called Guest Mode that is primarily aimed at shared consumer PCs that need to be returned to their original running state after being used by a child or guest. The feature can be enabled on individual user accounts; when user logs off or the PC reboots, those accounts are wiped clean and returned to their original configuration. Guest Mode is useful for small classrooms, libraries, and other shared computing scenarios, but is really designed for home use, where parents may want to configure the feature for their children.

    Guest Mode was originally called PC Safeguard."

    I hope this helps the people that are trying to use SteadyState with Windows 7

    Rob
    That feature was included in an earlier beta revision, and removed before release. I looked for that feature for awhile before finding that out.

    Sean Hanson
    Friday, January 22, 2010 1:18 PM
  • Hello Rob

    Is there a document posted somewhere that would list all the setting used by either MS toolkit, or SteadyState uses to lock down the PC's that could be applied in a AD enviroment.   I have just started the process of setting up a DC, and would like to secure our Public Access Computers via GPO that would give me the same lockdown enviroment as the MS Toolkit/SteadyState.  I am sure it can be done, I just have no idea where to find all the settings.

    Gary Welte

    Gary there is a book from Microsoft press on Group Policy that if you make it through the entire thing will give you the answers you need to lock it down. Windows Group Policy Guide is the title. There are lots of quick things posted on the web, but if you don't know what you are doing in Group Policy you will get into trouble fast. I've put this task off for a while because I need to learn a few other things and may switch our domain controllers and file shares over to something like OpenSolaris. This won't give you the list of functions to lock, but will arm you if you can find that list.

    In the mean time about the only thing I could suggest is something to make an image of the hard drive and store it on the network, then find a way to have the computers network boot every night and restore that image over night. Clonezilla (and DRBL) might be able to do this, but I have not tried building the DRBL server yet due to lack of funds and lack of time. There is a similar Macintosh application but it requires an Xserve (which I have) but I haven't fooled with it yet, it's called DeployStudio. I may try to build the DRBL server on the Xserve and run it that way simply because I have the hardware sitting here doing nothing. We have around 50 XP machines in my department and I'm sure the college is getting ready to do a Win7 change soon. I'm pretty sure I could wake all of our computers remotely and have them come up in a pixie boot mode to do the image restore every night while no one is here. It's on my list of things to do when I have the time (which never seems to happen).
    Friday, January 22, 2010 10:10 PM
  • Here is an answer that is not so wonderful but might work... What about one of the "Live" disks from one of the *nix operating systems. If the disk is configured and is read only, then there is nothing they can do to mess it up. Not going to be the fastest OS in the world, but it might work. I've recently started playing with OpenSolaris from Sun and I'm pretty impressed with it. Pretty sure you can set up a single server and network boot to that server to run the applications and authenticate the users. That could give you computers with no hard drives (or maybe just a flash drive for making it boot if the hardware can not network boot). It would give places like libraries computers that can get out on the web and run a few specific applications that they choose. It will not of course work in a classroom where you may need third party Windows apps running (like my labs), but anywhere that just plain web browsing and maybe typing a document (with Open Office) is required this would be fine. And at least it (OpenSolaris) would be free to try.
    Friday, January 22, 2010 10:26 PM
  • hello,

    i also tried to install steady state 2.5 on windows 7.
    i found out, that you can set all restrictions, you can apply that and you can login the userprofile and it is restricted.
    you can't login the resticted user, when you activate "lock profile...".

    okay, what settings where changed by activating "lock profile":
    - the user folder under c:\documents and settings\$username$ ist renamed to $username$.orig
    - the new userfolder is also set as profil folder in the user management
    - the ntuser.dat ist renamed to ntuser.man

    all changes where set on windows 7 but it doesn't work.

    where comes the ."orig" behind the username?
    i think thats the problem.
    the knowledge base says a mandatory profile must have a .v2 folder extension.
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/973289

    Have anyone an idea?

    Regards
    Saturday, January 23, 2010 11:38 AM
  • I'm another Library admin who is not going to deploy Win7 unless there is a compatible SteadyState.   I'm just looking through this thread for the first time and it is obvious that stopping support for this product will be harsh on many libraries and schools. 

    Kind of the opposite of the goals of the Gates Foundation.  Truly disappointing.

    on my knees, pleading to the almighty MS,

    fb
    Sunday, January 24, 2010 9:59 PM
  • Sorry, i forgot you have to set the Setup File in Windows compatibility Mode.

    Regards.
    Wednesday, January 27, 2010 7:21 AM
  • If you read thru this post and others, you will see that your words fall on deaf ears.  Microsoft no longer supports education.  There are many posts about steady state that support that.  We have to take any new machines with Windows 7 and downgrade them to Win XP so we can use Steady State.  Its more important that students have computers they can use, instead of pc's with Windows 7.  Microsoft also does not support education any longer, considering the costs for having products like MS Office.  Licensing of MS products kills education.  So, go to Google.  Schools in all states now are going to Google, its FREE,  it provides all the same products as Microsoft for no charge.  Soon there will be a replacement for Windows and why will anyone need Microsoft any more?  They just don't have any interest in what the customer wants. What you see on TV and in ads is all just for show.   The real world know better.   We endorse Open Office for people who ask us about what to use at home.  Use Chrome.   Support those who help you.
    Wednesday, February 03, 2010 5:01 PM
  • That is great that Google provides all the same products as Microsoft and they are all free.  So what is the Google replacement for Steady State? What is the Google replacement for Windows XP or 7?
    Friday, February 05, 2010 6:48 PM
  • To add to this... I've been running OpenSolaris for a couple weeks now and if a person is willing to do a little learning, I think it would make a good OS for community usage like at a library. It appears you can lock it down really tightly like any other Unix OS, combine that with network boot so that the OS doesn't actually live on the client computer and you should be able to get a nice secure system that really can not be tampered with by the end user. Currently comes with an older version of Firefox, has Flash support, supports most of the flash memory storage devices that I've tried. Open office of course works. Still reading the book to learn a bit more about what I need to do to make it what I want.

    The big area that it lacks is in mutlimedia because it does not come with any codecs installed. You can buy officially licensed codecs, or possibly compile the open source versions, but there seem to be no packages for codecs built that make it easy to install them.

    I'm also about to try the Android x86 port from Androidx86.org and see how well that runs on my laptop. Not sure if it will be good or not.
    Monday, February 08, 2010 3:49 PM
  • Monday, September 13, 2010 7:30 PM
  • Just give people the links/information they need directly here insetad of forcing them to go through your site, the same info you could be posted here and it keeps all the info together in one coherent place!

    Creating a Steady State by Using Microsoft Technologies

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=ef232619-7600-4768-b111-f60ba13862ea&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+MicrosoftDownloadCenter+%28Microsoft+Download+Center%29#tm

    Windows SteadyState Reference Spreadsheet

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=544B466B-558C-4882-8797-C96E5694CB40

    Group Policy Settings for Creating a Steady State

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=1DE3C7CE-5AF8-4E54-84B8-1FAB6161730F

    While you all may know SteadyState is being discontinued, MS has released ways to achieve the same "SteadyState" with the built in features of Windows 7. Like myself in a school there should be no prob in setting up a Win 7 box to do what SteadyState did, the links above are a starting a point.

    Another foum/discussion should be created titled something like "Replicating Windows SteadyState actions by using Windows 7 Features" etc and we talk/discuss how we do it. Any volunteers?

    Tuesday, September 14, 2010 3:34 PM
  • Hi,

     

    Windows Steady State cannot support in Windows 7.

    in windows 7 use parental control for user securities & restrictions.

     

     

    Regards,

    Purushottamaher


    Hardware & Networking Engg.of ESDS Software Solution Pvt.Ltd.Nashik.
    Saturday, September 18, 2010 6:55 PM
  • Thank you for posting this information.

    It's realy sad that MS has chosen NOT to continue to provide a wonderful tool like WSS for the public use.  I work at a public library with 200 PC's and am part of a library consortum that has around 1000 PC"s.  Most have been using MSTK or WSS along with DeepFreeze to lock down their PC's.  Most will NOT upgrade to Win7 due to the heavy workload involved in learning and then implimenting GPO as a sollution.  IF we must learn GPO to lock down our MS Windows PC's we might as well move over to OpenSource such as Linux and not bother with MS any longer and do it for FREE.

    Microsoft is a dying dinisor and will soon be gone

    MICROSOFT, PLEASE RESPONDE !!!!

    Sunday, September 19, 2010 4:07 PM
  • I have to say that, though I am disappointed that MS dropped WSS, I am happy with where we have landed after migrating away from WSS. We now use Deep Freeze and GPOs to apply restrictions on public library computers. Being able to apply changes that effect 300+ computers at a time is a huge time saver, and ends up paying for the software we've had to purchase. We were lucky enough to have the budget to do this, where many organizations don't. 

    A couple of points to be made, though...

    Open Source is hardly ever free. You just put development time in place of money, and time is money. I've played around with this idea, but the end users we have would riot with the incompatibilities that still exist.

    GPOs take some time to learn, but once they are in place you just have to document the template and tweak for changes along the way. If you do these at a Windows domain level, then the tweaks you make will automatically roll out. 

    purushottamaher mentioned using Parental controls, but these only do about 5% of what WSS did. I think it's only useful for what it says...parents.

     

    I try to go the free or inexpensive route as much as I can, so I was surprised to find that the Windows domain with GPOs and Deep Freeze was the most cost effective way to go. I do, however, have to remotely manage 1000 PCs, so the centralized management is a key time-saver.


    Sean Hanson
    Sunday, September 19, 2010 5:10 PM
  • I wanted to go with a central server (AD) but the central IT dept. did not want to pay for the HW/SW so I am stuck managing PC's locally (except for DF).  The main pushback I got from my IT dept. was the cost of the MS server license.

    I find I get alot of pushback from management when it comes to any IT spending.  Pain in the @$$

    Maybe next year, always the optimist.

    Sunday, September 19, 2010 6:38 PM
  • Try a software called SmartShield from Centurion Technologies work perfect on XP ,Vista and Win7 but it is not free. www.centuriontech.com
    Monday, October 11, 2010 9:33 PM
  • Hi,

    I have got the solution for installing Steady State on windows 7 & this information i have post on here.

     

    http://www.esds.co.in/forum/f4/trick-using-steady-state-windows-7-a-1380/

     

    Sean Hanson you can also try this installation information on your system & give me the feedback it is working or not.

     


    Hardware & Networking Engg.of ESDS Software Solution Pvt.Ltd.Nashik.
    Tuesday, October 26, 2010 2:40 PM
  • Found this on the TechEd 2010 presentations.

    http://itpro.fi/asiantuntijaryhmat/tyoasemat/wioski/default.aspx

     

    Saturday, November 13, 2010 11:44 AM
  • Easier: http://www.wioski.com/

    I'm the creator so don't hesitate to contact me sami "dot" laiho "at" sovelto "dot" fi

    Sami

    Thursday, March 10, 2011 6:23 AM
  • Hey Phillip

    I work in a public library in New Jersey, I have a similar setup of about 22 public computers. Software: Sam, Deep Freeze, Netsweeper, Windows Steady state, Faronics, and some. The tech who worked here before me was able to get windows steady state to work with windows 7. I don't know how but that is how the computers are configured now. Im in need of communications with some other techs who have similar technical challenges. All women and Im one of the few men here, I need someone technical to communicate with.

    Is there a way that you know of for me to be able to figure out how the installation was done? (Windows Steady State on Windows 7)

    Thursday, May 12, 2011 3:41 PM
  • I was able to install Steady State on Win7 by simply running the installer in compatibility mode. The only feature I can think of off hand that doesn't work is the Lock Profile option, but without having one of those systems in front of me I can't verify that fact. I had some tweaking with locked settings to do for our needs, but for the most part it's working great. I just put those systems in place for public use this week, so we'll see with the teens do to them.
    Thursday, June 09, 2011 7:24 PM
  • Hey Phillip

    I work in a public library in New Jersey, I have a similar setup of about 22 public computers. Software: Sam, Deep Freeze, Netsweeper, Windows Steady state, Faronics, and some. The tech who worked here before me was able to get windows steady state to work with windows 7. I don't know how but that is how the computers are configured now. Im in need of communications with some other techs who have similar technical challenges. All women and Im one of the few men here, I need someone technical to communicate with.

    Is there a way that you know of for me to be able to figure out how the installation was done? (Windows Steady State on Windows 7)

    Mathmajor,

         Other than what NRG Star posted above in this thread, no I don't know how, nor did I attempt to try to get it to work. I am in the process of getting new windows 7 machines next month and I have been using Faronics' WINSelect lockdown tool, in conjunction with Deep Freeze and their Anti-Virus tool and so far it has worked out well. I am of the opinion that public access Internet machines should be locked down as little as possible, to keep user experience headaches to a minimum, while hiding those windows features that would allow patrons to actually shut down certain things, (like Sam). Otherwise, its just too much of a headache, within a Windows environment, to try to make a consistent user experience with all these desktop restrictions locked down too much. Windows just wasn't designed for a public access, shared user environment. I have resolved myself to just implementing a few settings with WINSelect, and let the chips fall where they may, unless I find something that really requires a setting within WINselect to be enabled. It's also nice to be able to administer the machines from their Core Console, but the price is worth it.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Philip


    Complexity is the enemy of Security -- Steve Gibson
    Friday, June 17, 2011 2:46 PM
  • I have found a Great replacement for windows steady state which doesnt work with windows 7, Its call Reboot Restore RX.  I know this thread is a bit old but if anyone is looking for a great replacement to Windows steady state, they should look into Reboot restore RX.  Here is the link to the page.  Just google:  Reboot Restore RX

    Tuesday, July 23, 2013 2:28 AM