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Connection to DC lost and enabling GUI impossible

    Question

  • I transferred my AD lab from VMware ESXi 5.1 to Hyper-V 2012 Core. I have only 1 server to act as Hyper-V host, but during the migration I wanted to join the host to my domain, so temporary I had another Hyper-V client on W8 machine, started the DC.

    Everything else worked fine, I even managed to create several networks via virtual switches, and I also enabled RRAS on a Hyper-V host. Then I created last network for nodes in different pool, and after next time, when I powered up my Hyper-V host, connection the DC was lost.

    I have 3 different units, lets call them:
    A = Hyper-V host with RRAS, and several NICs
    B = W8 client with Hyper-V client
    C= DC sitting on a client Hyper-V

    A can access B, but not C
    D can access both
    C can access B, but not C

    I copied DC to Hyper-V host, thought I could start it from there, reconfigure network and access to DC there. Nope - DC will start, but console connection via Hyper-V is not possible, because of some layer of security.

    Last option - I´m trying to enable GUI on Hyper-V host. Tried to used powershell, dism, server manager dashboard from B to A. Everytime the result is the same - cannot download source files, even if I specify source as DVD media or install.wim

     
    Monday, July 08, 2013 4:19 PM

Answers

  • There is a lot going on in your post, so let me take a stab (guess).

    Hyper-V Server (the free SKU) cannot have the VM Console or any GUI components added to it.

    You can take a Core installation of Windows Server, add the Hyper-V Role, and in turn add all of the GUI.

    These two things are mutually exclusive of each other.

    If you are using Hyper-V Network Virtualization, the configuration does not persist a reboot - you have to re-write all of the routing rules and configuration.

    Beyond that, I am not sure what all you have going on.  Since you mention "pool" and the only pools in Hyper-V are 'under the hood' and most folks don't interact with them.


    Brian Ehlert
    http://ITProctology.blogspot.com
    Learn. Apply. Repeat.
    Disclaimer: Attempting change is of your own free will.

    • Marked as answer by yannara Monday, July 29, 2013 5:56 AM
    Monday, July 08, 2013 5:50 PM
    Moderator
  • That is what I stated, domain membership does indeed make remote management easier.


    Brian Ehlert
    http://ITProctology.blogspot.com
    Learn. Apply. Repeat.
    Disclaimer: Attempting change is of your own free will.

    • Marked as answer by yannara Monday, July 29, 2013 5:57 AM
    Tuesday, July 09, 2013 12:49 PM
    Moderator
  • Remove-Computer -Force

    or

    netdom remove %computername%

    What error are you getting? Inability to login with local credentials is troubling.


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    • Marked as answer by yannara Monday, July 29, 2013 5:56 AM
    Tuesday, July 23, 2013 3:25 PM
  • +1 to what Brian said. Hyper-V Server and Windows Server in Core mode are two completely distinct products and I'm confused as to which one you actually have installed.

    You probably don't need to rejoin your clients. They don't have any idea, and do not care, what condition the AD database is in. The only ways you'd have a problem is if a machine changed its password on the DC that it could contact and that change was never replicated to the surviving DC or if the surviving DC doesn't have a record of the machine ever existing. In either case, you'll get an error about the machine account or its trust relationship with the domain when you attempt to sign in. Then you'll know that you have to leave and rejoin.

    I do not believe that you made a mistake with a single host Hyper-V system in a domain. I still think your problem lies somewhere in the network connectivity system, perhaps with DNS. You can certainly switch to workgroup-mode or VMWare if that is what you prefer.

    GUI-less installations can be managed locally by PowerShell and remotely through the RSAT tools. You can also use the previously linked Corefig and PSHVM tools.

    Brian has an Announcement at the top of these forums that explains how to connect remotely to a Hyper-V Server system that is in a workgroup.

    VMM doesn't require a domain, although I have personally had mixed results trying to set it up without one. However, I would caution against adding even more complexity to this system. VMM's greatest uses are for templating and cloud operations.


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    • Marked as answer by yannara Monday, July 29, 2013 5:55 AM
    Thursday, July 25, 2013 1:45 PM

All replies

  • There is a lot going on in your post, so let me take a stab (guess).

    Hyper-V Server (the free SKU) cannot have the VM Console or any GUI components added to it.

    You can take a Core installation of Windows Server, add the Hyper-V Role, and in turn add all of the GUI.

    These two things are mutually exclusive of each other.

    If you are using Hyper-V Network Virtualization, the configuration does not persist a reboot - you have to re-write all of the routing rules and configuration.

    Beyond that, I am not sure what all you have going on.  Since you mention "pool" and the only pools in Hyper-V are 'under the hood' and most folks don't interact with them.


    Brian Ehlert
    http://ITProctology.blogspot.com
    Learn. Apply. Repeat.
    Disclaimer: Attempting change is of your own free will.

    • Marked as answer by yannara Monday, July 29, 2013 5:56 AM
    Monday, July 08, 2013 5:50 PM
    Moderator
  • By pool, I ment subnet of AD, which has a NIC in RRAS acting as its gateway.

    I´m using datacenter W2012, not free stand-alone Hyper-V. It was originally installed as core, but since my network to DC broke down, I´m trying to establish direct connection to DC, by moving it to a primary host hyper-V (A).

    Main question is, that if I´m running an AD lab on a single Hyper-V host, should I even make it a domain member server? I would like to have it as core, but make possible to manage it remotely with consoles of other VM servers, like dashboard of 2012.


    • Edited by yannara Monday, July 08, 2013 7:36 PM addinh
    Monday, July 08, 2013 7:35 PM
  • Outside of a domain join making remote management easier using the Remote Admin tools, there is no reason to domain join any Hyper-V Server to a domain. (quite honestly).


    Brian Ehlert
    http://ITProctology.blogspot.com
    Learn. Apply. Repeat.
    Disclaimer: Attempting change is of your own free will.

    Monday, July 08, 2013 10:26 PM
    Moderator
  • Outside of a domain join making remote management easier using the Remote Admin tools, there is no reason to domain join any Hyper-V Server to a domain. (quite honestly).


    Brian Ehlert
    http://ITProctology.blogspot.com
    Learn. Apply. Repeat.
    Disclaimer: Attempting change is of your own free will.


    Thanks, I didn´t know that. I actially thought oppisite, that using management tools would be easier with domain membership. Will the dashboard also work?
    Tuesday, July 09, 2013 6:29 AM
  • That is what I stated, domain membership does indeed make remote management easier.


    Brian Ehlert
    http://ITProctology.blogspot.com
    Learn. Apply. Repeat.
    Disclaimer: Attempting change is of your own free will.

    • Marked as answer by yannara Monday, July 29, 2013 5:57 AM
    Tuesday, July 09, 2013 12:49 PM
    Moderator
  • With all due respect to Brian and his considerable talents and knowledge, many of us DO think the opposite -- not saying he's wrong, just that it's an opinion and there's no universal consensus. Count up all the ways people struggle with workgroup-mode Hyper-V Servers and compare them to the one or two examples of AD-related issues like yours, for starters. Then toss in single-sign-on, remote administration, centralized management via group policy, shared-nothing Live Migration, etc., and you give up a lot to gain a little. In my opinion, of course.

    But, to your issue, why do you need the GUI? If you're just trying to reconfigure network settings, that can be done through PowerShell or even sconfig.cmd, if you're not doing anything fancy. There's plenty of knowledge here to help you get it done if you need assistance.


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Tuesday, July 09, 2013 12:52 PM
  • But, to your issue, why do you need the GUI? If you're just trying to reconfigure network settings, that can be done through PowerShell or even sconfig.cmd, if you're not doing anything fancy. There's plenty of knowledge here to help you get it done if you need assistance.

    I lost the connection to DC, when it was on the Hyper-V client, and then I decided to move it to the main Hyper-V host server, reconfigure network in DC, to be in a same subnet with Hyper-V, and then my domain connection would be online again. But, I cannot connect to the DC via remote Hyper-V manager. That´s why I´m trying to install Hyper-V console on a host, to be able to access DC via Hyper_V management, and reconfigure network. When using remote Hyper-V management, DC powers up on a host, but "connect" does not allow me to access, because of some autentification layer error.


    • Edited by yannara Tuesday, July 09, 2013 1:07 PM uuuu
    Tuesday, July 09, 2013 1:07 PM
  • So, when you try to open the vm console, you get an error? (did I get that right?)

    what is the error?


    Brian Ehlert
    http://ITProctology.blogspot.com
    Learn. Apply. Repeat.
    Disclaimer: Attempting change is of your own free will.

    Tuesday, July 09, 2013 1:23 PM
    Moderator
  • Rather than reconfigure the DC's subnet to be in the Hyper-V Server's subnet, would it make sense to reconfigure the Hyper-V Server's subnet to be in the DC's subnet, since you have access to one and not the other? It's not like any of it has to be permanent.

    Do you have the text of the authentication error handy?


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Tuesday, July 09, 2013 1:23 PM
  • Here's what I'm thinking on the Hyper-V host:

    Remove-NetIPAddress -InterfaceAlias "Ethernet"
    Remove-NetRoute -InterfaceAlias “Ethernet″ -DestinationPrefix 0.0.0.0/0
    New-NetIPAddress -InterfaceAlias “Ethernet″ -IPAddress 192.168.0.25 -PrefixLength 24 -DefaultGateway 192.168.0.1
    Set-DnsClientServerAddress -InterfaceAlias "Ethernet" -ServerAddresses 192.168.0.20
    Restart-Service -Name "Netlogon"

    Then you can just log off and you should then be able to log in with domain credentials. In the above, "Ethernet" is the name of the adapter holding the Hyper-V Server's management address, 192.168.0.25 represents the IP you want to use for it in the DC's subnet, 192.168.0.1 is the gateway on that subnet, and 192.168.0.20 is the IP of the DC.

    If I'm reading you correctly and the RRAS service is currently running on the Hyper-V Server host, I believe I'd stop it until I got through this. Once the crisis passes, I would consider putting that role into a VM rather than having it run right on the host.


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Tuesday, July 09, 2013 1:41 PM
  • Rather than reconfigure the DC's subnet to be in the Hyper-V Server's subnet, would it make sense to reconfigure the Hyper-V Server's subnet to be in the DC's subnet, since you have access to one and not the other? It's not like any of it has to be permanent.

    Do you have the text of the authentication error handy?


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Hyper-V has a NIC/gateway to each subnet, as also to the DC. The IPv4 network was something like this;

    I have 3 different units, lets call them:
    A = Hyper-V host with RRAS, and several NICs
    B = W8 client with Hyper-V client
    C= DC sitting on a client Hyper-V

    A can access B, but not C (ping)
    B can access both (ping)
    C can access B, but not C (ping)

    But thanks for your help guys, today I restarted both hyper-Vs and VMs, reconfigured RRAS, and it´s all working again. I created another DC to Hyper-V host site, so next time, at least internal communication between host and domain will be established.

    If you are intrested, or if I will be having more problems, I will first make a draft of my subnets, gateways and NICs for next time.

    Tuesday, July 09, 2013 5:38 PM
  • Glad you got it fixed. Just my opinion again, but I'd say to always have a document of any network and its IPs even if you don't think you'll need help with it.

    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Tuesday, July 09, 2013 5:49 PM
  • I would also like to mention, that I have continues problems with DVD drives in Hyper-V, both client and server. Both either do not want to refresh content on a media, seeing something like setup.exe 0 bytes size, or keep wining about DVD drive being busy by another process or problem. I didn´t had such childish problems with VMware :)
    Thursday, July 11, 2013 10:13 AM
  • This happends again, I lost connection totally inside my network. I had to restart hyper-v host, after that communication with domain was partly enterupted, on some of services stoped working.

    The machine DC0 with 10.0.1.4 resides on another Hyper-V client, which also stands behind gateway 10.0.1.1. DC0 does not ping 10.0.0.1 and hyperv1 does not ping 10.0.1.4. Everything else is pingin everyone.

    - I´m not able to connect VM guests in hyper-v from a client with IP 10.0.1.11
    - I´m not able to use any services opened with mmc remotely from 10.0.1.11
    - I´m not able to enable GUI to Hyper-Host with powershell

    • Edited by yannara Sunday, July 14, 2013 6:16 PM rrrrr
    Sunday, July 14, 2013 6:13 PM
  • Hah, I´m starting to loose my faith to Hyper-V (so missing VMware right now ;)

    Because remote control of RRAS service did not work propertly, (I thought I would control RRAS service on core installation remotelly), I desided to wipe out RRAS on hyper-v core and I build up new server for RRAS with full gui. I managed to setup new network and routing, so the new routing server has all the same nics with numbers 10.0.x.254. Everything worked fine, until I restarted the entire system.

    Now the inside traffic is totally dead, and I cannot remote manage Hyper-V with its console because of autentification and remote RPC failures. 

    Monday, July 15, 2013 5:13 PM
  • I have no doubt that you're frustrated with all of this, but the Hyper-V virtual switch has been through its trial by fire and it works. I don't see anything in your symptom report that makes me think Hyper-V is at fault. This smells like an RRAS issue. I hope this doesn't come across as rude, but you've got a lot of moving parts in a single box here, and I don't know that you've built up enough experience with all of them.

    I highly recommend flattening your networking configuration until you're certain you've got everything under control, THEN try to stick RRAS in the mix. I have a lot of this going on my own cluster system. I designed a cluster that hosts a guest cluster that simulates a multi-site cluster dependent upon RRAS. All of the DCs are virtualized. I can bring the entire system up from a dead-power-off situation and it all works. I am certain, first-hand, that all of these technologies can work together.


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Monday, July 15, 2013 5:21 PM
  • You are right Eric, that I have too much going on, and I won´t say that I´m 100% familiar with RRAS or networking.

    Difference between VMware ESXi and Hyper-V is, that Hyper-V relies too much on DC connection, DNS and Windows based auhorization on AD. I used totally the same configuration (same NICs, IP-pools, same config in RRAS) with VMware, and I could easily kill my AD, but same time my VMware infrastructure would be accessible without any problems (only the AD authorization would be gone).

    With Hyper-V, while AD being shutdown or internal network configuration error, I cannot access Hyper-V services, that´s the main problem. I understand perfectly, that in the real world production enviroment, no one would probably use single host virtualization platform. And no one would keep shutting down and resume these servers like I do at home.

    I also suspect RRAS, the same thing happened to me twice - I could easily shutdown and startup my entire infrastructure, and network did work ok, but right after I created backup network directly between 2 nodes, next time I power on Hyper-V, communication to domain is half dead and services not working.


    Just a side comment about flattining RRAS as you suggested - because I play with different subnets, RRAS seems to be mandatory, without it nothing moves from subnet to another.
    • Edited by yannara Monday, July 15, 2013 6:33 PM RRAS
    Monday, July 15, 2013 6:31 PM
  • I understand what you're saying, but I'm going to challenge a bit of it. Hyper-V doesn't require AD at all in order to run. You can join a Hyper-V system to a domain and then delete the domain controllers and it will still function into perpetuity without modification. What you're mostly struggling with is remote management (assuming I'm reading your posts properly), and that's only one tiny part of what Hyper-V is. You can still manage it from its console and if RDP is enabled, you can RDP in with a local administrator account.

    I haven't tried it, but I would assume that if you're having these problems, you could configure a domain-joined Hyper-V host the same way that you would for a workgroup-joined host and use the management tools with local accounts. That's not my cup of tea; Brian Ehlert would know much better than I so I hope he's still lurking this thread.

    If it turns out that there's an issue with RRAS preventing connection to a DC because of a startup order operation or something, that's still not on Hyper-V. Maybe a non-Microsoft software router is a better option? RRAS is also my weak link. It worked perfectly for me the first time I tried it, which means that I had no opportunity to learn how to fix it.

    I'm not saying to erase RRAS from the equation. I'm saying to begin with a flattened network and then add it back in later. Realistically, if I were to expose even the most highly seasoned VMWare expert to Hyper-V for the first time, I would initially avoid this level of complexity. I would skip the multi-subnets and the clusters and all of that. Make a siloed host and guests work first and build on that knowledge.


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Monday, July 15, 2013 6:46 PM
  • Eric, you forgot that I´m running a core installation of W2012 with Hyper-V role. Only way to manage it locally would be a powershell :)

    You are absolutelly right about replacing RRAS with router+nat device, I had that config first few years back, but there is this issue, when I´m swaping my domain joined computer in use from AD network to public, I either have to keep DHCP in router (which I don´t want), or reset the router to bridged mode, every time I shut down my lab and start using internet directly.

    Monday, July 15, 2013 8:38 PM
  • Eric, you forgot that I´m running a core installation of W2012 with Hyper-V role. Only way to manage it locally would be a powershell :)

    You say this as though it were a bad thing! PowerShell support for Hyper-V and administration in 2012 is nothing short of amazing.

    But, fortunately for you, your statement is not entirely true.

    CoreFig

    PSHVM


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Monday, July 15, 2013 8:47 PM
  • I managed to solve this by setting additional virtual server with RRAS and full gui, so I had a full control of rras console. RRAS being in Hyper-V and remote console control added me some issues.

    Another point is, first I need to set all my Virtual Switches I need, and then configure RRAS routing. When I added another vswitch, problems with rras started (this happened twice).

    Tuesday, July 16, 2013 4:08 AM
  • Well, once again I came up with the same problem. I decided to remove the DC from a client Hyper-V, and setup another one to a host Hyper-V, that they both would be on the same subnet and switch, so the AD services would not suffer. Proper removal of a DC on a client failed, and now by AD services are not available at all. This also means, that VMs on Hyper-V host is locked. I decided to remove Hyper-V host from AD, to join workgroup. Also this seems to be impossible - if I enter local admin credentials (same one I login with RDP session), it fails because AD services are not available and domain cannot be find. What a heck? :o

    How I swap it to the workgroup without online domain?

    Tuesday, July 23, 2013 3:19 PM
  • Remove-Computer -Force

    or

    netdom remove %computername%

    What error are you getting? Inability to login with local credentials is troubling.


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    • Marked as answer by yannara Monday, July 29, 2013 5:56 AM
    Tuesday, July 23, 2013 3:25 PM
  • Now I have the sketch of my enviroment. I drew the green cut lines between DC0 and RRAS, which means that connection breakes there, that was the the main reason. After that, AD services becomes unavailable or unreliable, and connection to VMs with Hyper-V interupts or not establishing. (I will paste the exact error codes next time).

    I will try now the following:
    1. Dropping Hyper-V host to a workgroup.
    2. Logging to DC1, enabling GUI.
    3. Trying to solve AD service problem, probably DC0 account need to be removed and deleted 100% from all records

    Blue = Hyper-V host
    Yellow = Hyper-V client

    Wednesday, July 24, 2013 11:30 AM
  • I´m failing to install GUI on a Hyper-V and my AD services are totally off. There is no access to DC1 of anykind. No problem, I have the same AD enviroment elswere which I can migrate of. So it is okay to terminate this entire host and rebuild the whole lab with existing AD database. Only negative impact would probably be, that I would have to rejoin my clients to AD, because it´s database is a little bit older, than in the host.

    Here is a problem of enabling GUI: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/6eb62cdc-ae43-48b1-873e-9903c3bc73a7/powershell-to-add-gui-to-server-core-servercorefullserver

    Anyway, now I´m thinking, should I go to VMware, or give a Hyper-V another shot. I understand, that probably it was a misstake to keep single host Hyper-V in a domain, right? But what are the options of managing the host if:
    - it´s a core installation
    - it´s a workgroup member

    I´m also very intrested of setting up VMM, it will probably require domain joined Hyper-V?

    Thursday, July 25, 2013 8:09 AM
  • the instructions you post are only valid if the SKU of the media is Windows Server and it was installed using the Core option.  It is not possible to add the Windows Shell (GUI) to a Hyper-V Sever SKU (the free Hyper-V SKU).

    That seems to be your biggest struggle here.

    I have added the GUI to a Core install of Windows Server and it works straightaway.


    Brian Ehlert
    http://ITProctology.blogspot.com
    Learn. Apply. Repeat.
    Disclaimer: Attempting change is of your own free will.

    Thursday, July 25, 2013 1:15 PM
    Moderator
  • +1 to what Brian said. Hyper-V Server and Windows Server in Core mode are two completely distinct products and I'm confused as to which one you actually have installed.

    You probably don't need to rejoin your clients. They don't have any idea, and do not care, what condition the AD database is in. The only ways you'd have a problem is if a machine changed its password on the DC that it could contact and that change was never replicated to the surviving DC or if the surviving DC doesn't have a record of the machine ever existing. In either case, you'll get an error about the machine account or its trust relationship with the domain when you attempt to sign in. Then you'll know that you have to leave and rejoin.

    I do not believe that you made a mistake with a single host Hyper-V system in a domain. I still think your problem lies somewhere in the network connectivity system, perhaps with DNS. You can certainly switch to workgroup-mode or VMWare if that is what you prefer.

    GUI-less installations can be managed locally by PowerShell and remotely through the RSAT tools. You can also use the previously linked Corefig and PSHVM tools.

    Brian has an Announcement at the top of these forums that explains how to connect remotely to a Hyper-V Server system that is in a workgroup.

    VMM doesn't require a domain, although I have personally had mixed results trying to set it up without one. However, I would caution against adding even more complexity to this system. VMM's greatest uses are for templating and cloud operations.


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    • Marked as answer by yannara Monday, July 29, 2013 5:55 AM
    Thursday, July 25, 2013 1:45 PM
  • the instructions you post are only valid if the SKU of the media is Windows Server and it was installed using the Core option.  It is not possible to add the Windows Shell (GUI) to a Hyper-V Sever SKU (the free Hyper-V SKU).

    That seems to be your biggest struggle here.

    I have added the GUI to a Core install of Windows Server and it works straightaway.


    Brian Ehlert
    http://ITProctology.blogspot.com
    Learn. Apply. Repeat.
    Disclaimer: Attempting change is of your own free will.


    This is not a free Hyper-V. It is installed from Windows 2012 media.
    Thursday, July 25, 2013 2:08 PM
  • The adding the GUI is rather straightforward.

    Try the process here, it applies to the online image and not a mounted WIM.

    http://mythoughtsonit.com/2012/03/how-to-add-the-gui-to-windows-server-8-to-server-core/


    Brian Ehlert
    http://ITProctology.blogspot.com
    Learn. Apply. Repeat.
    Disclaimer: Attempting change is of your own free will.

    Thursday, July 25, 2013 3:10 PM
    Moderator
  • The adding the GUI is rather straightforward.

    Try the process here, it applies to the online image and not a mounted WIM.

    http://mythoughtsonit.com/2012/03/how-to-add-the-gui-to-windows-server-8-to-server-core/


    Brian Ehlert
    http://ITProctology.blogspot.com
    Learn. Apply. Repeat.
    Disclaimer: Attempting change is of your own free will.

    Dism /online /enable-feature /featurename:ServerCore-FullServer /featurename:Server-Gui-Shell /featurename:Server-Gui-Mgmt

    ...this stucks for a moment at 66, and still wines about source files...

    Thursday, July 25, 2013 6:23 PM
  • Insert your Windows Server 2012 DVD and append

    /source:D:\sources\sxs

    to the DISM command -- D: is your DVD drive letter.


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Thursday, July 25, 2013 6:41 PM
  • VMM doesn't require a domain, although I have personally had mixed results trying to set it up without one. However, I would caution against adding even more complexity to this system. VMM's greatest uses are for templating and cloud operations.


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Specially templating is something I need from VMM, so glad to hear domain membership of Hyper-V is not required.

    At the end, struggling with core installations without good powershell skills probably occured this all mess to happend. I can´t blame RRAS either, because same setup worked in my previous VMware lab just fine. So I killed my core servers, got the Hyper-V host finally to become full-gui and restored my AD from previous VM, multiple it to few DCs and we back on track.

    Thanks for the support, I hope now I get to the bottom of System Center.


    • Edited by yannara Friday, July 26, 2013 4:31 PM rrrrr
    Friday, July 26, 2013 4:30 PM
  • Hyper-V Server and Windows Server in Core mode are two completely distinct products and I'm confused as to which one you actually have installed.


    I installed Windows 2012 core server and added a Hyper-V role. I don´t quite believe they would be distinct, as you say. Hyper-V is only a role, as the others. I actually asked Jeff Woolsey on a Techdays about this, and he told that recommend methot do implement Hyper-V is to use a datacenter core installation with Hyper-V role. This is, because core won´t require so much updates as gull gui. And probably would run a little lighter.

    I´m closing this thread, thank you guys for the help. I will continue to evaluate Hyper-V in my lab purposes.
    Monday, July 29, 2013 5:55 AM
  • I promise you, they are distinct. Unless you believe I faked this screengrab:

    People are constantly coming here and telling us they have "Hyper-V Server Core" when there is no such beast. There is Hyper-V Server and there is Windows Server with Hyper-V. You apparently have the latter. We have to ask for clarification because Windows Server will do a great many things that Hyper-V Server will not.


    Eric Siron
    http://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/

    Monday, July 29, 2013 1:43 PM
  • I see, that I wrote this in a little bit the wrong way. As a product, Hyper-V and Server OS are different, but a system lies beneath must be the same, right? Correct me, if I´m wrong, but as I understand, there is 2 different products:


    1. Free Hyper-V core system based on Windows 2012 server, without any other capabilities. This is a Microsoft´s answer to VMware ESXi and Citrix XenDesktop free Hypervisors.

    2. Windows Server 2012 standard or datacenter, which can be afterward configured as Hyper-V, with or without GUI. This is the version enterprice uses, and it cost a lot :)

    Monday, July 29, 2013 4:28 PM
  • Yes.  We seem to be bringing this difference up quite a bit.

    And You use the term "Hyper-V core system" and if you notice we have been very careful not to use the word "core" as that implies a "core" installation of Windows Server (Server without the GUI).

    the free Hyper-V Server is only the hypervisor, the very base kernel, the virtual machine management service, the networking stack, the file system stack, portions of the storage stack, and portions of clustering. 

    Yes, the equivalent to XenServer, and ESX. 


    Brian Ehlert
    http://ITProctology.blogspot.com
    Learn. Apply. Repeat.
    Disclaimer: Attempting change is of your own free will.

    Monday, July 29, 2013 4:41 PM
    Moderator