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Adding a backup drive SBS2011

    Question

  • Hi

    I know you have to have an original backup drive attached to SBS2011 when adding a new one.

    I have a client that has 2 USB 2TB HDD's they rotate for backup on SBS2011

    We want to add another 3 into the cycle so 5 are rotated throughout a week.

    Now I have gone to add it, I have ensured there is an existing backup drive attached, attached the new... gone through the Add drive wizard and it through up an error "Cannot configure backup schedule"

    Anyone run into this.

    To confirm, Server set up with
    Backup1

    Backup2 was added a few weeks later into the cycle

    Currently the drive connected is Backup2 as I am trying to Add Backup3

    Surely I only need any existing configured backup drive connected to add new drives.... or do I need specifically Backup1 connected? (and if so... surely that's bad... what happens if Backup1 physically dies... how will any be added then??)

    Tris

    Monday, September 23, 2013 8:11 PM

Answers

  • Here is my backup strategy for all of my SBS boxes.  I install an additional RAID1 1 or 2TB set in the server and configure your SBS to backup to this internal drive.  Then use a copy utility (I like FastCopy) and write a couple of simple batch files and schedule them to to copy the contents of the internal drive to your external drives daily.

    It's nifty to always have your most recent backup on an internal drive for quick file restores.  And your backup is no longer a single point of failure.

    This strategy is easily expanded upon to incorporate additional servers on your network, or even for workstation backups.  Here's how I handle that...  on the internal drive, create a shared folder called BACKUPS.  Under that create a folder for your SBS server, any other server, and depending on how many workstations you have, you may want to create a WORKSTATIONS folder.  Now here's the trick...  use  the Windows Server Backup tool under Administrative Tools to configure your SBS backup.  Point your SBS backup to the shared \\SBSSERVERNAME\BACKUPS\SBSSERVERNAME folder.  That way SBS won't take over the drive, and you can backup your other server and workstations to their shared folders on the same drive.  Now all your backups reside on the internal RAID1.  Then use FastCopy to copy the backups to your external drive daily.

    If you do this, it's a good idea to have the external drives the same size or greater than the internal drive.  If you want to get crafty you could write your batch files to do a WEEK1, WEEK2, etc. to the external drives.  Or you could exclude the workstation backups and just let them reside on the internal drive instead of copying them to the external drives, giving more room for backup history for your server(s).

    If you don;t have enough slots in your SBS you could just do this to a single SATA drive.

    I always say that backups are the biggest waste of time and money in the world, until you need one, then all the money in the world won't buy you one if you don't have it.

    Just my two cents. Peace...

    Mike


    Saturday, September 28, 2013 10:04 AM

All replies

  • refer to  http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/f5bdf9ba-c652-4afc-9019-8bf18b863fe2/sbs2011-backup

    Best,

    Howtodo

    Tuesday, September 24, 2013 4:15 PM
  • Hi

    Ok so you have to have the very first drive plugged in, so for my situation Backup1

    I have seen the article which requires a commandline based 'Workaround'

    This surely can not be by design......

    Hard drives fail... thats why we do backups.... we do multiple backups, because backup hard drives can fail.

    Whats being said is you are pretty much screwed from ever using the wizard again if your Backup1 drive ever fails - that can not be by design....

    "Hi we have this lovely backup system with a great GUI, which is needed for business users - sbs is designed for those without technical expertise - however, should that first backup drive fail - you then have to find this really obscure - non-microsoft - published command line in order to be able to use the backups in the future.... we did this for a bit of a giggle and to make your lives harder... can't always be easy"

    This is clearly a fault with the software, NO other backup system ever requries this... so will MS actually fix this? Even SBS2008 didn;t require this. I know I only had 1 USB port free on the PC that had the backups set up, and the wizard worked great as I added 5.

    If no one can answer this... how do I escalate this issue to those more closely linked to the SBS team like Susan? 

    Wednesday, September 25, 2013 10:43 AM
  • Here is my backup strategy for all of my SBS boxes.  I install an additional RAID1 1 or 2TB set in the server and configure your SBS to backup to this internal drive.  Then use a copy utility (I like FastCopy) and write a couple of simple batch files and schedule them to to copy the contents of the internal drive to your external drives daily.

    It's nifty to always have your most recent backup on an internal drive for quick file restores.  And your backup is no longer a single point of failure.

    This strategy is easily expanded upon to incorporate additional servers on your network, or even for workstation backups.  Here's how I handle that...  on the internal drive, create a shared folder called BACKUPS.  Under that create a folder for your SBS server, any other server, and depending on how many workstations you have, you may want to create a WORKSTATIONS folder.  Now here's the trick...  use  the Windows Server Backup tool under Administrative Tools to configure your SBS backup.  Point your SBS backup to the shared \\SBSSERVERNAME\BACKUPS\SBSSERVERNAME folder.  That way SBS won't take over the drive, and you can backup your other server and workstations to their shared folders on the same drive.  Now all your backups reside on the internal RAID1.  Then use FastCopy to copy the backups to your external drive daily.

    If you do this, it's a good idea to have the external drives the same size or greater than the internal drive.  If you want to get crafty you could write your batch files to do a WEEK1, WEEK2, etc. to the external drives.  Or you could exclude the workstation backups and just let them reside on the internal drive instead of copying them to the external drives, giving more room for backup history for your server(s).

    If you don;t have enough slots in your SBS you could just do this to a single SATA drive.

    I always say that backups are the biggest waste of time and money in the world, until you need one, then all the money in the world won't buy you one if you don't have it.

    Just my two cents. Peace...

    Mike


    Saturday, September 28, 2013 10:04 AM