none
SBS 2011 Std - setup crashes while loading drivers

    Question

  • I am performing a clean install to a RAID 10 array on a brand new machine. I created a bootable USB flash drive from the ISO using the Windows 7 USB tool. The drive boots fine and it says "loading files" but shortly after the windows logo animation, the system performs a hard restart. If I press F8 during boot, I am able to enter safe mode just fine. I am even able to begin the setup process. The RAID array is detected nicely and everything appears normal, but once I restart and boot from the hard drive array, I get the same hard restart failure as when I boot from the USB. I am assuming that this is driver related because safe mode works. I have tried loading different drivers for the array but the same thing happens. I have tried to enable boot logging, but the timestamp on the ntbtlog.txt file is from the very first boot, not the last, seeming to indicate that the failure occurs before the session manager starts. I even double checked the checksum of the ISO to make sure it downloaded properly. None of the BIOS options seem suspect, although I did try switching the PnP OS option on and off to no avail. I would just continue the setup process in safe mode, and sort out the drivers later, but that is apparently not possible.

    Thanks in advance for any help.

    Wednesday, October 19, 2011 8:24 PM

Answers

  • No probaly not. At least with the white box side of things. You might check into the hard drives themselfes, perhaps trying one outside the raid controller just to confirm.

    For a lab/play enviroment I'd not have much of an issue, but for a production box, I'm really going to spec out something supported and of course working from the get go. If you had as much trouble recoverying a production server as your having just getting it to install, somebody is really going to be unhappy.

     


    /kj
    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    • Marked as answer by mantheiinc Monday, October 24, 2011 1:52 PM
    Friday, October 21, 2011 6:58 PM

All replies

  • Guessing it would be the same booting a real DVD, but might be worth a try.

    What RAID controller, what Server?

     


    /kj
    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    Wednesday, October 19, 2011 8:58 PM
  • I haven't had a chance to plug in a drive to test with the actual DVD, but it is on my list.

    The controller is an LSI 9212. Not sure what you are referring to by "Server" but I am trying to install the [edit] 64bit [/edit] Standard Edition of SBS 2011. The hardware is a white box setup, so no vendor support, but I have had good luck with the component manufacturers thus far.


    • Edited by mantheiinc Wednesday, October 19, 2011 9:23 PM missing information
    Wednesday, October 19, 2011 9:20 PM
  • Using the latest LSI supplied driver (P11 ?), firmware and all else up to latest.

    Given the white box, you might just try a standard 2008 R2 server build to simplify if you can even get that far.

     


    /kj
    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    Wednesday, October 19, 2011 9:44 PM
  • So far today I have tried:

      - installing from a DVD

      - ensuring all firmware is up-to-date for the motherboard, on-board controllers, and the LSI controller card

      - installing a plain old 2008 R2 SP1 build

      - including the drivers for the secondary (storage) array during install, just in case

      - unplugging the storage array

    Nothing has worked.

     

    I plan to do a full system memory test, even though the failure is predictable rather than random like most RAM issues. Beyond that, I am out of ideas. Is there any other way to determine which driver might be causing the failure, other than boot logging?

    Thursday, October 20, 2011 9:50 PM
  • I don't know why I hadn't tried this yet, but I decided to try removing all the variables from the equation by unplugging everything from the motherboard with the exception of the CPU,  fans, and LEDs, and reseting the BIOS to "failsafe defaults".

    Booting to the USB flash drive, Windows setup still crashes. I didn't bother to test any other boot media because it doesn't seem to matter.

    The thing that continues to boggle my mind is that Safe Mode works, but enabling boot logging does not generate any output. I'm going to try it again, but I'm not holding my breath. I really don't think that whatever is causing the crash is something I can control.

    Thursday, October 20, 2011 10:41 PM
  • No probaly not. At least with the white box side of things. You might check into the hard drives themselfes, perhaps trying one outside the raid controller just to confirm.

    For a lab/play enviroment I'd not have much of an issue, but for a production box, I'm really going to spec out something supported and of course working from the get go. If you had as much trouble recoverying a production server as your having just getting it to install, somebody is really going to be unhappy.

     


    /kj
    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    • Marked as answer by mantheiinc Monday, October 24, 2011 1:52 PM
    Friday, October 21, 2011 6:58 PM
  • Kevin, thanks for all the advice. After attempting to install Ubuntu 11.10 as a final resort, with the same results as the Windows installs, my assumption is that this is a hardware or firmware issue which I will be pursuing with the hardware manufacturer.

    I would generally go with vendor supported hardware for production, but my boss actually is quite okay with the risk and seems to enjoy the "homebrew" experience. Can't say I mind, but I do realize that it may come back to bite me later.

    Monday, October 24, 2011 1:52 PM
  • Often a frequent thing with some this homebrew indepenance, or anti-proprietary mentality.

    Just the flip side of the finger pointers that like to have a vendor to blame and hold to the fire.

    Name brand or not, it does seem that your hardware has 'issues'.  - Thanks for posting back your findings. 


    /kj
    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    Monday, October 24, 2011 3:32 PM