none
windows server 2012

    Question

  • Dear All

    im planning to provide 120 user with a session based desktop service and zero clients instead of using legacy PCs

    my question is how many virtual machine I have to create in the host to serve the 120 user and how to control each user where to connect (in which machine)

    another question is how many session can the virtual machine windows 7 handle concurrently

     thanks

    Saturday, September 14, 2013 2:38 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    Regarding your question, I would like to explain you will need to create 120 virtual machines to server the 120 users. When the users connect to their VMs, they need to type the computer name.

    To manage these VMs conveniently, I suggest you create the VM’s name according to the user’s name. For Windows 7 OS, it will only allow 1 concurrent session.

    More info about VDI
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dn167710.aspx

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/canitpro/archive/2013/04/25/step-by-step-deploying-virtual-desktops-with-windows-server-2012.aspx


    Niki Han
    TechNet Community Support

    Monday, September 16, 2013 7:07 AM
  • Actually, without a significantly greater amount of information, it is pretty hard to answer your question.  There are two primary ways of creating virtual desktops.  One is to create an image that is unique for each individual.  This often ends up being more expensive that using desktops because you are tranferring all the processing and storage requirements to the data center instead of managing the desktop systems.  You still have to manage the patching and software distribution to all 120 VMs, so the management cost becomes the same.  And you don't have zero clients; you still have 120 clients.  The users still need a device to access their systems.

    Another way to provide this capability is to create a pool of VMs that are allocated/deallocated as people log in.  Applications are provided to users according to the group they belong to.  This ends up saving significant amounts of storage on the server side because there is no need to store the entire image for the 120 systems.  Unless you have 120 concurrent users all the time, this often ends up saving storage.

    What you need for a host could also change.  If you want to create a separate VM for each user that they can simply connect to, that means that you would have 120 VMs running all the time.  You have to size the server for that.  In a pooled model, the assumption is made that not all users are concurrent, so you size for the maximum concurrency desired.

    There are quite a few variables that need to be investigated for this.  The links provided in the earlier post is a place to start, but it is just a beginnning.


    .:|:.:|:. tim

    Tuesday, September 17, 2013 12:58 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    Regarding your question, I would like to explain you will need to create 120 virtual machines to server the 120 users. When the users connect to their VMs, they need to type the computer name.

    To manage these VMs conveniently, I suggest you create the VM’s name according to the user’s name. For Windows 7 OS, it will only allow 1 concurrent session.

    More info about VDI
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dn167710.aspx

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/canitpro/archive/2013/04/25/step-by-step-deploying-virtual-desktops-with-windows-server-2012.aspx


    Niki Han
    TechNet Community Support

    Monday, September 16, 2013 7:07 AM
  • Actually, without a significantly greater amount of information, it is pretty hard to answer your question.  There are two primary ways of creating virtual desktops.  One is to create an image that is unique for each individual.  This often ends up being more expensive that using desktops because you are tranferring all the processing and storage requirements to the data center instead of managing the desktop systems.  You still have to manage the patching and software distribution to all 120 VMs, so the management cost becomes the same.  And you don't have zero clients; you still have 120 clients.  The users still need a device to access their systems.

    Another way to provide this capability is to create a pool of VMs that are allocated/deallocated as people log in.  Applications are provided to users according to the group they belong to.  This ends up saving significant amounts of storage on the server side because there is no need to store the entire image for the 120 systems.  Unless you have 120 concurrent users all the time, this often ends up saving storage.

    What you need for a host could also change.  If you want to create a separate VM for each user that they can simply connect to, that means that you would have 120 VMs running all the time.  You have to size the server for that.  In a pooled model, the assumption is made that not all users are concurrent, so you size for the maximum concurrency desired.

    There are quite a few variables that need to be investigated for this.  The links provided in the earlier post is a place to start, but it is just a beginnning.


    .:|:.:|:. tim

    Tuesday, September 17, 2013 12:58 AM