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Project Server 2013 Licence clarification

    Question

  • Hi All,

    I want to procure 100 CAL for Project server 2013. Do I need to procure 100 CAL for Sharepoint also? SInce Sharepoint is a prerequestic Iam confused whetehr the CAL needs to be procured for Sharepoint aswell. Can some one please confirm or provide some url.

    Thanks in advance

    Roy Joyson


    Roy Joyson

    Saturday, September 07, 2013 6:17 AM

Answers

  • To license Project Server for users, you must have SharePoint Standard and SharePoint Enterprise CALs for each user, in addition to a Project Server User CAL.  I believe Project Professional comes with the Project Server User CAL.

    For licensing questions, always contact Microsoft Licensing.

    http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/


    Trevor Seward, MCC

    Follow or contact me at...
      

    This post is my own opinion and does not necessarily reflect the opinion or view of Microsoft, its employees, or other MVPs.

    • Marked as answer by RoyJoyson Saturday, September 07, 2013 8:16 AM
    Saturday, September 07, 2013 6:27 AM

All replies

  • To license Project Server for users, you must have SharePoint Standard and SharePoint Enterprise CALs for each user, in addition to a Project Server User CAL.  I believe Project Professional comes with the Project Server User CAL.

    For licensing questions, always contact Microsoft Licensing.

    http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/


    Trevor Seward, MCC

    Follow or contact me at...
      

    This post is my own opinion and does not necessarily reflect the opinion or view of Microsoft, its employees, or other MVPs.

    • Marked as answer by RoyJoyson Saturday, September 07, 2013 8:16 AM
    Saturday, September 07, 2013 6:27 AM
  • Thanks for the quick Response Trevor. Much appretiated.

    Roy Joyson

    Saturday, September 07, 2013 8:16 AM
  • Trevor's advice is correct, with two corrections.

    1. Project Professional does not come with a Project Server User CAL. It comes with a Device CAL. This means that Project users may not access Project Server from any device other than their primary device unless they separately purchase additional Device CALs or a User CAL.

    From the January, 2014 Product List:

    "Customers who license Project Professional 2013 will be deemed to have one Project Server 2013 Device CAL."

    2. The need for Project Server users  to also have a SharePoint Enterprise CAL is, as far as I can tell, undocumented in official documents such as the Product List or Product Use Rights. While white papers (and forums like this one) may state it as a requirement, it is not.

    Product Use Rights identifies the following functions in SharePoint that require a SharePoint Enterprise CAL. The list does not include Project Server functionality.

    "Additional Functionality:
     Business Connectivity Services Line of Business Webparts
     Office 2013 Business Connectivity Services Client Integration
     Access Services
     Enterprise Search
     E-discovery and Compliance
     InfoPath Forms Services
     Excel Services, PowerPivot, PowerView
     Visio Services
     PerformancePoint Services
     Custom Analytics Reports
     Advanced Charting"


    Paul DeGroot Principal Consultant Pica Communications "Solving the Microsoft Licensing Puzzle"

    Friday, January 17, 2014 11:55 PM
  • Since Project Server is an addon, it would not be mentioned in the SharePoint PUR, but it does require Enterprise as Project Server leverages Enterprise-only features, such as PerformancePoint.

    Trevor Seward

    Follow or contact me at...
      

    This post is my own opinion and does not necessarily reflect the opinion or view of Microsoft, its employees, or other MVPs.

    Friday, January 17, 2014 11:59 PM
  • I'm not sure what you mean by an "add-on." It is a separately licensed product with dependencies of SharePoint and SQL server. I would guess that if the Performance Point service in SharePoint is not started no Enterprise CAL would be required. 

    I consider it a significant defect in Microsoft's documentation that this dependency is not documented, and since it is not documented I do not consier it a requirement. It is not explicitly stated as such in the applicable contract documents and any Microsoft customer would be justified in assuming this requirement does not exist. There is no language here compelling a Project 2013 customer to acquire SharePoint CALs of any kind and customers could reasonably ignore assertions that they have a legal requirement to purchase those CALs.

    An obvious place to do it would be in the section on licensing requirements for Project Server. Here are the requirements for Project Server 2013. It does not mention a SharePoint CAL requirement.

    BASE CALs
    You need:
     Project Server 2013 CAL, or
     Project Online User SL, or
     Project Pro for Office 365 User SL

    Note also the (badly worded) language in the Product list (this is from Note 75 in the Nov. 2012 PL, the last to include Project 2010).

    "Project Server 2010
    One-time exception in connection with the new technical dependency of the Project Server 2010 software
    on SharePoint Server 2010. As a result, Project Server 2010 customers will require SharePoint Server 2010
    and SharePoint Server 2010 Standard and Enterprise CALs."

    This clause was removed in the next edition of the Product list, which was the first to include Project Server 2013. On what grounds would you assume that, when a requirement is removed from the Product List, it is really still there?

    The evidence is that this requirement was in place for Project 2010 but has been removed for Project 2013. 

    This would seem to be consistent with the other significant changes to licensing for SharePoint 2013 (which I view very positively), such as the elimination of CAL requirements for external users.


    Paul DeGroot Principal Consultant Pica Communications "Solving the Microsoft Licensing Puzzle"

    Saturday, January 18, 2014 12:40 AM
  • So therefore, can we be sure that no SharePoint (neither Standard nor Enterprise) CALs are required to use Project Server from the Web Browser or Project Pro? Pl confirm. Additionally, what version of MS SQL Server and CALs will be required? Pl advise.

    Thanks and Regards,

    Ajit Menon

    Thursday, August 28, 2014 10:31 AM
  • Hi,

    yes, I confirm that for using Project Server you need SharePoint ser´ver + SharePoint Standard CALs + SharePoint Enterprise CALs.

    Project Server requires also an SQL Server. you can for example install SQL express Edition free to download it without CALs, but this Edition is limited on Features and with 10 GB max as a database Limits. the express Edition is also limited on Features like for example Analysis Services and Business Intelligence (not supported on the express Edition).

    you can purchase SQL Server Standard Edition per Server + CALs or per core licenses OR SQL Server Business Intelligence Server + CALs OR Enterprise Edition per core licenses.

    thanks

    diramoh

    Thursday, August 28, 2014 12:37 PM
  • Diramoh,

    I'm presuming that you forgot to include the source for your assertion. Please provide us with the contract language that confirms the requirement for the Enterprise CAL. I'm not sure that quoting you at audit time will constitute a legal defense.

    Thursday, August 28, 2014 2:09 PM
  • hi Paul,

    on this link:http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee662114(v=office.15).aspx we have the following:

    "Project Server 2013 requires the Enterprise edition of SharePoint Server 2013. Prior versions of SharePoint Server and SharePoint Foundation 2013 are not supported."

    for licensing, Microsoft offers only one SKU for SharePoint Server but for customers wants to have the Enterprise Features(required for Project Server) than you need Standard + Enterprise CALs for SharePoint.

    thanks

    diramoh  

    Thursday, August 28, 2014 3:36 PM
  • So, a couple of things.

    1. Technet is not an authoritative or legally binding source of licensing information. Technet articles are not contractual documentation. Customers are not bound by them. If the rules are not in their agreement, in the Product Use Rights, the Product List, then they are not enforceable. So I need to see that language in a document that is part of the contract Microsoft signs with customers. Technet can make up anything it likes, but if it can't make up licensing rules or fill them in where they don't exist in the customer's contract..

    2. One thing that Technet just made up here is the notion of the "Enterprise Edition of SharePoint Server 2013." There is no such server. So it tells me that whoever wrote this article is not expert on licensing, and I am even less inclined to consider it binding on customers.

    Paul

    Thursday, August 28, 2014 6:15 PM
  • Hi,

    yes, i agree with your opinion that Technet is not a source for licensing. However, on the link about Project Server requirements, the SharePoint Server Enterprise is a Software requirement for Project Server.

    to have this Software(SharePoint Enterprise), you need to purchase the license.

    if you contact Microsoft Support for licensing question, the answer will be that you Need SharePoint Server 2013 + std + enterp CALs to be legal for activate the Enterprise Features on the SharePoint Server.

    thanks

    diramoh


    • Edited by diramoh Friday, August 29, 2014 11:42 AM
    Friday, August 29, 2014 9:13 AM
  • I deal with many customers who are negotiating agreements with Microsoft and also with customers who are being audited by Microsoft. My customers have from 500 to 125,000 PCs and my customers last year accounted for perhaps $350 million of Microsoft software revenue.

    My advice to customers at this point would be to challenge any statement by an auditor that said SharePoint Enterprise CALs are required for Project. The rule is not in the customer's contract. And for a customer looking at purchasing or renewing an agreement with Microsoft, I would not consider that use of Project Server requires a SharePoint Enterprise CAL.

    I would agree that Microsoft, or the SharePoint team, might want the extra revenue from customers who also purchase Project, but I would tell my customers to challenge that demand if it came up in an audit. The auditor could not use language from Technet, white papers, an email from Microsoft, comments by an MVP, or any similar documentation to force the customer to purchase the CALs. 

    Customers need to know, when entering a contract, not only what the rules are, but what they will be over the contract term, for any of the products they are purchasing. That's the whole point of a contract. It says "we agree, vendor and purchaser, what is being purchased right now, what rights the customer has to use it as of this date, and the circumstances under which both the purchaser and the vendor might be deemed to have broken the contract." A vendor who says "these are the rules unless we change our mind and we can change our mind any time, and anything any of our employees says or writes can change this contract, and you, the customer who is signing that contract, doesn't have the right to resist any arbitrary change" is simply not a vendor you can work with. A customer could not sign that contract because it will be rife with uncertainty and unpredictability.

    Nothing is stopping the SharePoint team from adding use of Project Server to the list of uses that require an Enterprise CAL. It can't be effective for SharePoint 2013, because any customer who currently has the product is covered by the rules in effect when they purchased it. But if they wanted to create a rule like that for SharePoint 2016, for example, they should do it, and document it appropriately in contractual documents.

    As an example of this kind of cross-product licensing, Lync voice services may require customers to have an Exchange Enterprise CAL if they use voice mail with Lync. Lync stores its voice mail in the user's Exchange inbox, and the contract documents specify that Exchange requires Enterprise CAL for a unified inbox. If customers don't want this liability, they don't use Lync for voice mail, and I have customers who use Lync for voice, but don't use native Microsoft voice mail services for exactly that reason.

    So it can be done if a team's product manager are willing to put the effort--like five minutes to write an email to the licensing group that manages the contractual licensing documents. Product managers should not expect customers to be able to read their minds. If they can spell it out in TechNet, they can spell it out in Product Use Rights.


    Paul DeGroot Principal Consultant Pica Communications "Solving the Microsoft Licensing Puzzle"

    Friday, August 29, 2014 2:26 PM