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Want to go from single Exchange 2003 to Exchange 2010 with HA, Failover etc

    Question

  • We currently have a single Exchange 2003 Enterprise server running on Windows 2003 R2 Enterprise and are exploring ways to transition to a Exchange 2010 solution that offers high availability/failover and replication.  Should one server die, the other one can take over because it has the same information.  That's probably the most important thing.  I don't really care about load balancing but it's a plus if that can be done.  Clustering as well if that can be a plus.  I also wish to virtualize all this as vmware.

    The organization is not large so there wouldn't be more than 5 databases.  

    - Should I get Exchange Enterprise 2010?  Or should I go with Standard?

    - How many Exchange servers would I need as a minimum to get redundancy and high availability going?  Can I get by with just two?

    - I plan on installing this on Windows 2008R2 Enterprise.  But I believe the licensing calls for Windows 2012 now and there are two editions.  Standard and Datacenter.  Which one is best for this situation?

    Friday, June 21, 2013 12:57 AM

Answers

All replies

  • Hi,

    As the organization doesn't have much mailboxes you may go for Standard. But keep in mind that you will miss some of the features like Archiving, Journaling etc. which are presented with Enterprise CAL

    You can go with single server too, but you will miss some high availability features like DAG, CAS redundancy etc. If you go with two servers, you can configure DAG or CAS array NLB (One at a time). But, if you are sufficient for load balancing with DNS Round robin method or Hardware Load Balancer you can go ahead with 2 servers only.

    If you can arrange 4 servers, you can configure DAG between two servers and CAS Array between other two and Windows NLB with the same servers

    Standard edition of the OS is not supported with Faliover/Load Balancing etc. So if you plan high availability, you require Enterprise/Datacenter editions


    Regards from <a href="http://exchangeonline.in">ExchangeOnline</a> | <a href="http://windowsadmin.in"> Windows Administrator's Area</a>

    Friday, June 21, 2013 3:50 AM
    Moderator
  • But keep in mind that you will miss some of the features like Archiving, Journaling etc. which are presented with Enterprise CAL

    Im' sorry to disagree, but you can use anything on a Standard Exchange server edition, the only limitation is the 5 databases, however you need client enterprise cal (not the server one) if you want advanced features.

     "With this license type, a CAL is required for each user or device that accesses the server software. There are two types of CALs for Exchange, both of which work with either edition of the server"

    source: http://office.microsoft.com/en-001/exchange/microsoft-exchange-server-licensing-licensing-overview-FX103746915.aspx

    "How many Exchange servers would I need as a minimum to get redundancy and high availability going?  Can I get by with just two?"

    As Manu said, you can go with just 2 multirole servers (holding all roles), however you won't be able to use Windows NLB, if you want client acces redundancy, you will need a hardware NLB.

    You could use this scenario :

    2 multiroles servers on Windows 2008 R2 Enterprise edition (for DAG support) or Windows 2012 Standard

    Exchange Standard server edition

    You will have 5 databases per server max, including passive dag copy and public folder database.

    You build a CASArray object with some Hardware NLB to balance the VIP connection. Having only one HNLB is a SPOF, however you can switch the DNS A record of the VIP name if you loose it.

    You have 2 domains controllers GC-enabled in the Exchange AD site.


    Bruce Jourdain de Coutance - Consultant Exchange http://brucejdc.blog.free.fr

    Friday, June 21, 2013 7:19 AM
  • When you say advanced features with Enterprise CAL, what do you mean?  Is this so the user can archive and journal their OWN stuff?  Or will the Enterprise CAL allow a user to archive and journal anything on the SERVER?

    I'm trying to determine whether or not I need Enterprise CALs, but I know I certainly need Standard CALs for Exchange

    Why can't I use Windows NLB?

    What if I don't choose to have any hardware NLB?  I want clients to only hit one server and if that server should fail, I can turn on the other server and it would have all updated information on it?  is that possible?  

    I plan to run this on Windows 2008 R2 Enterprise.  Which OS supports your scenario?  Failover/Clustering?
    • Edited by Banc0 Friday, June 21, 2013 2:45 PM addendum
    Friday, June 21, 2013 2:18 PM
  • Advanced features like archive mailbox, eDiscovery, etc. need a client enterprise CAL + a normal CAL, whatever the server version (enterprise or standard). You need one ent. CAL per user that use any advanced feature, whatever the feature.

    Eg: if you want to enable the archive mailbox for a user, you need a ent. cal for that use, once you get it, you can also use any other adv features for that user.

    Why can't I use Windows NLB?

    DAG use failover clustering, you can't use both failover and NLB on the same server (like on a multirole server).


    Bruce Jourdain de Coutance - Consultant Exchange http://brucejdc.blog.free.fr

    Friday, June 21, 2013 2:50 PM
  • Here is good comparision of Exchange standard vs enetrprise

    http://exchangeserverpro.com/exchange-2010-faq-version-exchange-server-2010/

    Based on what requirements you have - you can decide which version is right for you.

    WNLB can be used for CAS, but again it has limitations like you cannot add more than 8 servers. HLB is recommended, but depends on reqs, budgets etc.,

    Friday, June 21, 2013 3:40 PM