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Help setting up DNS

    Question

  • Hi,

    I am currently setting up a new Server 2012 as a domain controller with AD and DNS for use at home and I am not sure how to set this up cause when I set it up the DNS never seems to work, any help on this would be great. I have currently setup the server with a static IP 

    I would like the server to use the router as the default DHCP and DNS and I am not sure how to achieve this cause if I setup the DNS to use the router I can do a nslookup and ping the clients and the server via IP but when I try and join them to the domain it does not work and I am unable to resolve the name I am able to RDP to the server from the client via IP and not by name any help with this would be really grateful.

    Regards,

    Michael

    Monday, March 10, 2014 5:36 AM

Answers

  • Routers are generally not DNS servers, so I'm not quite sure what you mean when you say you want to use your router as a DNS server.  On the other hand, it is quite common for routers to also fulfill the requirements of DHCP.

    Your environment is pretty typical.  On your router, configure DHCP to ignore some IP addresses and use one of those for the fixed IP address of your domain controller.  The DC will also need to use the router's IP address as its default gateway.  Then configure your DHCP to hand out your DC's address as the DNS address to any client requesting an IP address.  That should be all the configuration you need.

    When you set up the first DC and you are not specifying any other DNS environment, DNS will be automatically configured to work properly right out of the box.  DNS will automatically load the root hints needed for things like .com, .gov, .edu, .net, etc., so it will resolve names without needing to point to any other DNS server.


    .:|:.:|:. tim

    Monday, March 10, 2014 9:49 PM
  • If you're going to leave your router as your DHCP server, it is best to stand up DNS on your server and have your router issue out the server IP as the DNS server.

    To keep your internet functional, you'll need to set up forwarders on your DNS server.  You CAN forward it back to your router, but it's probably better to forward to Google or something.

    Here's an example:

    All clients:
    IP ADDR: 192.168.1.x
    Subnet:  255.255.255.0
    Gateway: 192.168.1.1
    DNS: 192.168.1.<serverIP>

    DNS Server should be the same as a client on the NIC, but when you open DNSMGMT.msc on the server, you can modify the 'Properties' of the server.  Add 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 on the forwarders tab.

    There's a little more to it than this, but you should be in the right direction now.


    - Chris Ream -

    **Remember, if you find a post that is helpful, or is the answer, please mark it appropriately.**

    Monday, March 10, 2014 10:34 PM

All replies

  • Routers are generally not DNS servers, so I'm not quite sure what you mean when you say you want to use your router as a DNS server.  On the other hand, it is quite common for routers to also fulfill the requirements of DHCP.

    Your environment is pretty typical.  On your router, configure DHCP to ignore some IP addresses and use one of those for the fixed IP address of your domain controller.  The DC will also need to use the router's IP address as its default gateway.  Then configure your DHCP to hand out your DC's address as the DNS address to any client requesting an IP address.  That should be all the configuration you need.

    When you set up the first DC and you are not specifying any other DNS environment, DNS will be automatically configured to work properly right out of the box.  DNS will automatically load the root hints needed for things like .com, .gov, .edu, .net, etc., so it will resolve names without needing to point to any other DNS server.


    .:|:.:|:. tim

    Monday, March 10, 2014 9:49 PM
  • If you're going to leave your router as your DHCP server, it is best to stand up DNS on your server and have your router issue out the server IP as the DNS server.

    To keep your internet functional, you'll need to set up forwarders on your DNS server.  You CAN forward it back to your router, but it's probably better to forward to Google or something.

    Here's an example:

    All clients:
    IP ADDR: 192.168.1.x
    Subnet:  255.255.255.0
    Gateway: 192.168.1.1
    DNS: 192.168.1.<serverIP>

    DNS Server should be the same as a client on the NIC, but when you open DNSMGMT.msc on the server, you can modify the 'Properties' of the server.  Add 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 on the forwarders tab.

    There's a little more to it than this, but you should be in the right direction now.


    - Chris Ream -

    **Remember, if you find a post that is helpful, or is the answer, please mark it appropriately.**

    Monday, March 10, 2014 10:34 PM