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ESB - Biztalk

    Question

  • In the old biztalk-newsgroup I've asked a question once about the 'difference' between BTS and ESB.

    Since I can't find that info anymore I'll ask again :-)

    To me ESB looks more like a philosophy and biztalk is a 'tool' you can use to implement that philosophy...

    But I don't know if that's correct....(probably isn't or I wouldn't ask)

    We already use BTS2006R2 for routing(based on rootnode and xml-content) and mapping mostly

    and of course the orchestrations where needed.

    We've always tried to keep businesslogic out of it (not always possible)
     
    What more is ESB , what is the benefit you could get from using an ESB?

    Thank You for your reply and helping me understand...

    Isabelle


    Kind regards Isabelledc
    Thursday, October 21, 2010 1:41 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    ESB toolkit is simply a collection of tools which extends the capabilities of BizTalk to support or enable loosely coupled and dynamic messaging architecture which includes itinerary-based service invocation, dynamic resolution of endpoints and maps. Here is couple of major terminologies with brief description to understand the functionalities.

    Itinerary: An XML Message with a list of services to execute, good example is Service Broker

    Dynamic: Finding an endpoint (like a web service location) at runtime, rather than hard coding it

    Message Routing: Use the BRE to determine where to route the message

     Please go through the following posts and videos which will help you understand it further

     http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee529141(BTS.10).aspx

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/biztalk/dd876606.aspx

    http://www.cloudcasts.net/Default.aspx?presenter=Richard++Seroter

    Regards,


    i.ahmad Please mark this as an answer if it helps
    • Marked as answer by isabelledc Monday, October 25, 2010 6:58 AM
    Thursday, October 21, 2010 2:36 PM
  • Hi,

    I agree with Dan that ESB is architectural style and offered by Microsoft through ESB Toolkit. It should be considered a toolkit as it bring many features/functionality like error management you can use without ever implementing a full ESB. Benefits implementing and ESB are:

    • Standardization;
    • Loose Coupling;
    • Scalability and Reliability;
    • Routing and mediation;
    • Complex message exchange patterns.

    As you notice many of these benefits can be found in BizTalk today. The Service Bus standardizes software connectivity and is taking a more service-oriented approach, adding support for the XML stack underlying web services and transport connectivity. This can be achieved through MS technology by ESB Toolkit and BizTalk.

    Regards,

    Steef-Jan Wiggers - MVP & MCTS BizTalk Server
    blog: http://soa-thoughts.blogspot.com/

     


    BizTalk
    • Marked as answer by isabelledc Monday, October 25, 2010 6:58 AM
    Thursday, October 21, 2010 3:01 PM
  • Lone time no see!  I think you're largely correct in much of this.  ESB is really more of a style or architectural approach.  That said the ESB Framework for BizTalk is a collection of tools that make doing that style much easier.  The Itinerary and Error management bits are my favorites.  I would check those out, especially the error management, it's realy useful in most BizTalk solutions. 

     

    Kind Regards,

    -Dan

    • Marked as answer by isabelledc Monday, October 25, 2010 6:58 AM
    Thursday, October 21, 2010 2:30 PM
  • I see the early MS position in this interview http://www.theserverside.net/tt/talks/videos/ScottWoodgate/interview.tss?bandwidth=dsl by Scott Woodgate (father of BizTalk ?).

    Seems the main feature of the ESB is the intermediate service (bus). That means the BizTalk is the ESB implementation.

    ESB Toolkit is just  some bits to colour BizTalk as  ESB for public. ESB Toolkit does not add any [important] "ESB" features to BizTalk.


    Leonid Ganeline [BizTalk MVP] Biztalkien blog
    • Marked as answer by isabelledc Monday, October 25, 2010 6:58 AM
    Friday, October 22, 2010 3:23 AM

All replies

  • Lone time no see!  I think you're largely correct in much of this.  ESB is really more of a style or architectural approach.  That said the ESB Framework for BizTalk is a collection of tools that make doing that style much easier.  The Itinerary and Error management bits are my favorites.  I would check those out, especially the error management, it's realy useful in most BizTalk solutions. 

     

    Kind Regards,

    -Dan

    • Marked as answer by isabelledc Monday, October 25, 2010 6:58 AM
    Thursday, October 21, 2010 2:30 PM
  • Hi,

    ESB toolkit is simply a collection of tools which extends the capabilities of BizTalk to support or enable loosely coupled and dynamic messaging architecture which includes itinerary-based service invocation, dynamic resolution of endpoints and maps. Here is couple of major terminologies with brief description to understand the functionalities.

    Itinerary: An XML Message with a list of services to execute, good example is Service Broker

    Dynamic: Finding an endpoint (like a web service location) at runtime, rather than hard coding it

    Message Routing: Use the BRE to determine where to route the message

     Please go through the following posts and videos which will help you understand it further

     http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee529141(BTS.10).aspx

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/biztalk/dd876606.aspx

    http://www.cloudcasts.net/Default.aspx?presenter=Richard++Seroter

    Regards,


    i.ahmad Please mark this as an answer if it helps
    • Marked as answer by isabelledc Monday, October 25, 2010 6:58 AM
    Thursday, October 21, 2010 2:36 PM
  • Hi,

    I agree with Dan that ESB is architectural style and offered by Microsoft through ESB Toolkit. It should be considered a toolkit as it bring many features/functionality like error management you can use without ever implementing a full ESB. Benefits implementing and ESB are:

    • Standardization;
    • Loose Coupling;
    • Scalability and Reliability;
    • Routing and mediation;
    • Complex message exchange patterns.

    As you notice many of these benefits can be found in BizTalk today. The Service Bus standardizes software connectivity and is taking a more service-oriented approach, adding support for the XML stack underlying web services and transport connectivity. This can be achieved through MS technology by ESB Toolkit and BizTalk.

    Regards,

    Steef-Jan Wiggers - MVP & MCTS BizTalk Server
    blog: http://soa-thoughts.blogspot.com/

     


    BizTalk
    • Marked as answer by isabelledc Monday, October 25, 2010 6:58 AM
    Thursday, October 21, 2010 3:01 PM
  • I see the early MS position in this interview http://www.theserverside.net/tt/talks/videos/ScottWoodgate/interview.tss?bandwidth=dsl by Scott Woodgate (father of BizTalk ?).

    Seems the main feature of the ESB is the intermediate service (bus). That means the BizTalk is the ESB implementation.

    ESB Toolkit is just  some bits to colour BizTalk as  ESB for public. ESB Toolkit does not add any [important] "ESB" features to BizTalk.


    Leonid Ganeline [BizTalk MVP] Biztalkien blog
    • Marked as answer by isabelledc Monday, October 25, 2010 6:58 AM
    Friday, October 22, 2010 3:23 AM
  • Thank you all for your replies...

    I'll have to do some reading I guess and try and find some time to install the ESB-toolkit , so I can play with it a bit to see what you're all talking about :-)

    Isabelle


    Kind regards Isabelledc
    Monday, October 25, 2010 6:57 AM