none
Windows 7 Power Management GPO Not Working As Expected with Folder Redirection Policy

    Question

  • Due to security requirements related to full disk encryption, our laptops are not permitted to go into sleep mode.  They are to be either in use, hibernated or powered off.

    So, a GPO was enable to remove the sleep option, but still hibernate automatically after 20 minutes of inactivity when on battery as well as hibernate on demand.

    Lid action was set to do nothing so users can close the laptop lid and walk around for short periods (such as between their office and a conference room for a meeting) without having to wait for it to resume from hibernation when they reopen the lid.  However, if they close the lid while on battery, it is supposed hibernate after 20 minutes because the policy is configured to hibernate on battery after that period of inactivity.

    The sleep options are gone from the menu as expected and the hibernation option is in the shutdown menu and works when manually selected, but the laptops never hibernate after 20 minutes of non-use as configured  So, if the user closes the lid and puts their laptop in the travel bag, the battery drains overnight instead of hibernating after 20 minutes.

    I ran the powercfg /energy command and saw two things that could be the issue:

    Analysis Results

    Errors

    Power Policy:Sleep timeout is disabled (On Battery)
    The computer is not configured to automatically sleep after a period of inactivity.
    Power Policy:Dim timeout is disabled (Plugged In)
    The display is not configured to automatically dim after a period of inactivity.
    Power Policy:Sleep timeout is disabled (Plugged In)
    The computer is not configured to automatically sleep after a period of inactivity.
    System Availability Requests:System Required Request
    The service has made a request to prevent the system from automatically entering sleep.
    Requesting Service Spooler
    System Availability Requests:System Required Request
    The device or driver has made a request to prevent the system from automatically entering sleep.
    Driver Name \FileSystem\rdbss
    System Availability Requests:System Required Request
    The device or driver has made a request to prevent the system from automatically entering sleep.
    Driver Name \FileSystem\rdbss

    The print spooler service is preventing the system from sleeping.  I looked this issue up on Google and the suggested fix found in various forums is to disable the print spool service.  That is not an acceptable solution since we need the service for printing. I can't imagine everyone disables their print spooler to allow automatic standby or hibernation.

    Is there a way to keep the spooler service without it preventing hibernation?

    FileSystem\rdbss is listed dozens of times.

    When I looked up rdbss it seems to be related to folder redirection.  We have a GPO that redirects Documents, Favorites and Desktop on laptops and syncs those folders offline so they can access the files when not connected to the network.

    A search did not find anything about this issue.  Is there a fix or reconfiguration of folder redirection GPO that can prevent the policy without the rdbss activity preventing hibernation?

    Saturday, April 26, 2014 3:02 AM

All replies

  • For Print Spooler:

    • Check that there are no jobs left in one of the printer.
    • Check that Printers folder under C:\WINDOWS\system32\spool\PRINTERS is empty.

    For folder redirection (rdbss): 

    You can set the following registry to your clients with GPO so Windows can sleep when a user is logged on with a redirected folders: 

    SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Power\PowerRequestOverride\Driver

    rdbss=2, DWORD

    srvnet=2, DWORD

    I believe you can set the PowerRequestOverride for print spooler as well with soothing like:

    powercfg -requestsoverride service spoolsv.exe DISPLAY SYSTEM.

    This will create the following REG which you can push to your clients with GPO as well:

    More help on those links:

    http://iboyd.net/index.php/2010/05/16/windows-7-power-management-fixing-pc-insomnia/

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/library/windows/hardware/dn550976  -> Power Availability Requests section.


    Please take a moment to Vote as Helpful and/or Mark as Answer where applicable. Thanks.




    • Edited by Idan Vexler Saturday, April 26, 2014 8:40 AM
    Saturday, April 26, 2014 8:01 AM
  • Those suggestions look good and I would try them out except that, after I posted the question, I tried logging out of one of the laptops and I left it at the login prompt running on battery and it still didn't hibernate after I let more than the time period specified for automatic hibernation pass.

    It wouldn't be a print job causing the issue, because all the laptops have this issue, not just one.

    I'm not sure how the print spooler or rdbss folder redirection would be the problem when there is no user logged into the laptop.

    This is a problem, plus I can't run the powerfcg /energy command without logging in so I can recheck if there is another process actively preventing the laptop from being "idle" long enough to reach the threshold for automatic hibernation even when there is no user logged in. 

     
    Saturday, April 26, 2014 1:59 PM
  • The laptop I tested didn't have any printers installed, but it had the Microsoft XPS Writer with a stuck job in the queue.  So, that was also part of the problem.

    I think there are multiple issues.  I will go ahead and try the suggestions you gave, but there may be more to it.

    I wonder if other activities such as the windows update client trying to send status reports to the WSUS server and the antivirus agent attempting to send status reports to the antivirus management console could also prevent sleep?  What about Outlook or Lync receiving messages or an open webpage that auto-refreshes? 

    Can periodic automatic group policy refreshes keep computers from going to sleep?

    Is there a way to run the powercfg /energy command for more than 60 seconds so we could see everything that may be trying to keep the computer from sleeping during the entire 20 minute idle period?







    • Edited by MyGposts Saturday, April 26, 2014 4:12 PM
    Saturday, April 26, 2014 4:06 PM