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Device CALs User CALs?

    Question

  • This CAL thing is throwing me for a loop and maybe someone can help me out.

    I'll lay out my network first.  I have 2 server currently, one is SBS 2008 and one is Server 2008 R2.  I plan on updating them to Server 2012 Standard.  

    The networks I have also have staff and students.  There is always a set amount of PC's being used about 14 hours a day.  Would it be better to get User CALs or Device CALs.

    From what I read on the forum a Device CAL marrys to the device and a User CAL marrys to a profile or user login?  IF so is there any differences between the CALS?  If I buy the user CALs will the devices they use still be able to be managed?

    Thanks a bunch

    Monday, December 16, 2013 9:18 PM

Answers

  • For Windows CALs, it's all paper-based activity (i.e. there is nothing to download nor install nor configure on your systems).

    per-device vs. per-user, the only thing which matters is the cost of buying them (they are otherwise identical from a use-rights perspective).

    if you have more users (humans, not logon accounts) than you have devices (workstations,laptops, etc but not servers), then buy per-device CALs.

    When a human sits at a device, and logs on to that device, and the logon authenticates to a Windows Server, you need a CAL for that authenticated connection to be properly licensed. In this scenario, either a User CAL, or a Device CAL, is acceptable.
    If a user authenticates/connects at that workstation, to multiple Windows Servers (e.g. fileserverA and FileserverB), only a single Windows Server CAL is needed (i.e. you don't need a CAL for every server-connection).

    So, you can buy either type, or, a mixture, whatever makes sense for your organisation's way of working, shared PC's, shiftworkers, etc.

    In larger scenarios, it may be even more economical to look at "CAL Suites", or various other "bundles", if you have more than a few Windows Servers and other MS server-based products in your organisation.


    Don
    (Please take a moment to "Vote as Helpful" and/or "Mark as Answer", where applicable.
    This helps the community, keeps the forums tidy, and recognises useful contributions. Thanks!)

    Tuesday, December 17, 2013 12:01 AM

All replies

  • For Windows CALs, it's all paper-based activity (i.e. there is nothing to download nor install nor configure on your systems).

    per-device vs. per-user, the only thing which matters is the cost of buying them (they are otherwise identical from a use-rights perspective).

    if you have more users (humans, not logon accounts) than you have devices (workstations,laptops, etc but not servers), then buy per-device CALs.

    When a human sits at a device, and logs on to that device, and the logon authenticates to a Windows Server, you need a CAL for that authenticated connection to be properly licensed. In this scenario, either a User CAL, or a Device CAL, is acceptable.
    If a user authenticates/connects at that workstation, to multiple Windows Servers (e.g. fileserverA and FileserverB), only a single Windows Server CAL is needed (i.e. you don't need a CAL for every server-connection).

    So, you can buy either type, or, a mixture, whatever makes sense for your organisation's way of working, shared PC's, shiftworkers, etc.

    In larger scenarios, it may be even more economical to look at "CAL Suites", or various other "bundles", if you have more than a few Windows Servers and other MS server-based products in your organisation.


    Don
    (Please take a moment to "Vote as Helpful" and/or "Mark as Answer", where applicable.
    This helps the community, keeps the forums tidy, and recognises useful contributions. Thanks!)

    Tuesday, December 17, 2013 12:01 AM
  • Great! :)

    So, Say I purchased all user cals, would I still be able to manage the devices just fine? i.e run updates on the pcs, use AD ect.

     I think a mixture would be best..

    Tuesday, December 17, 2013 11:21 AM