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Customized headings in the Navigation Pane of Word 2010

    Question

  • Any chance I can modify the Navigation Pane so that it uses customized styles in the pane rather than, or in addition to, Heading 1, Heading 2, and Heading 3? That would make me extremely happy and my life much easier!!!

    I use Word to write long, 70-page chapters with multiple leavel headings. I love the new Navigation Pane in Word 2010, especially the Heading view where I can see all my headings to the left of my document and easily move from one heading to another. The problem is I must use customized headings to submit my chapters to a publisher. We have a group of customized styles called A-Head, B-Head, C-Head, and D-Head. In earlier verisions of Word, I would build a customized Table of Contents at the top of my document using these styles so that I can easily navigate through my document. I would much prefer to use the Navigation Pane rather than this Table of Contents method.

     

     

     

    Wednesday, June 30, 2010 2:19 PM

Answers

  • Open the Styles pane. For each of your special styles in turn,
    right-click it and choose Modify; in the Modify dialog click the
    Format button and choose Paragraph. In the Paragraph dialog, set an
    Outline Level to reflect where that style sits in the heading
    hierarchy. (The built-in styles Heading 1, Heading 2, and Heading 3
    are assigned levels 1, 2, and 3. Your styles can have the same set of
    levels, or some other arrangement.) The Nav pane will show the
    headings with the special styles, with indentations according to the
    outline levels.

    On Wed, 30 Jun 2010 14:19:20 +0000, JeanNGeorgia wrote:

    Any chance I can modify the Navigation Pane so that it uses customized styles in the pane rather than, or in addition to, Heading 1, Heading 2, and Heading 3? That would make me extremely happy and my life much easier!!!

    I use Word to write long, 70-page chapters with multiple leavel headings. I love the new Navigation Pane in Word 2010, especially the Heading view where I can see all my headings to the left of my document and easily move from one heading to another. The problem is I must use customized headings to submit my chapters to a publisher. We have a group of customized styles called A-Head, B-Head, C-Head, and D-Head. In earlier verisions of Word, I would build a customized Table of Contents at the top of my document using these styles so that I can easily navigate through my document. I would much prefer to use the Navigation Pane rather than this Table of Contents method.
     


    Jay Freedman MS Word MVP
    • Proposed as answer by Jan Berinstein Friday, July 02, 2010 9:08 PM
    • Marked as answer by Sally Tang Monday, July 05, 2010 1:41 AM
    Thursday, July 01, 2010 3:15 AM

All replies

  • Open the Styles pane. For each of your special styles in turn,
    right-click it and choose Modify; in the Modify dialog click the
    Format button and choose Paragraph. In the Paragraph dialog, set an
    Outline Level to reflect where that style sits in the heading
    hierarchy. (The built-in styles Heading 1, Heading 2, and Heading 3
    are assigned levels 1, 2, and 3. Your styles can have the same set of
    levels, or some other arrangement.) The Nav pane will show the
    headings with the special styles, with indentations according to the
    outline levels.

    On Wed, 30 Jun 2010 14:19:20 +0000, JeanNGeorgia wrote:

    Any chance I can modify the Navigation Pane so that it uses customized styles in the pane rather than, or in addition to, Heading 1, Heading 2, and Heading 3? That would make me extremely happy and my life much easier!!!

    I use Word to write long, 70-page chapters with multiple leavel headings. I love the new Navigation Pane in Word 2010, especially the Heading view where I can see all my headings to the left of my document and easily move from one heading to another. The problem is I must use customized headings to submit my chapters to a publisher. We have a group of customized styles called A-Head, B-Head, C-Head, and D-Head. In earlier verisions of Word, I would build a customized Table of Contents at the top of my document using these styles so that I can easily navigate through my document. I would much prefer to use the Navigation Pane rather than this Table of Contents method.
     


    Jay Freedman MS Word MVP
    • Proposed as answer by Jan Berinstein Friday, July 02, 2010 9:08 PM
    • Marked as answer by Sally Tang Monday, July 05, 2010 1:41 AM
    Thursday, July 01, 2010 3:15 AM
  • This was helpful, thank you.

    How can I get headings in table cells to display in the navigation pane? My TOC is recognizing headings in the tables, but the navigation pane doesn't. If I move a heading outside a cell, it's immediately recognized in the navigation pane. I'd like it to also work from within tables.

    David

    Sunday, December 04, 2011 12:59 PM
  • "oque" wrote in message news:bf86fc48-5548-4c35-a60e-b64832281f38@communitybridge.codeplex.com...
    How can I get headings in table cells to display in the navigation pane? My TOC is recognizing headings in the tables, but the navigation pane doesn't. If I move a heading outside a cell, it's immediately recognized in the navigation pane. I'd like it to also work from within tables.
     
     
     
    The Navigation pane doesn’t recognize headings within table cells; this was also the case with its predecessor, the Document Map, in earlier versions of Word.
     
    Perhaps you could wrap a frame around the heading instead? (You’ll find the Insert Frame command if you click the Legacy Tools button on the Developer tab. To show the Developer tab, select that option at File | Options | Customize Ribbon).
     

    Stefan Blom, Microsoft Word MVP
    Sunday, December 04, 2011 1:09 PM
  • Perfect. Thanks a ton for this answer. I've been trying to figure this out for a while.

    Give this man a raise!

    Sunday, March 18, 2012 3:17 PM
  • When I go to the Paragraph dialog the Outline Level combo box is disabled.  Does my style have to descend from something special?  The disabled value now is "Body Text".

    Saturday, April 21, 2012 3:23 PM
  • When I go to the Paragraph dialog the Outline Level combo box is disabled. Does my style have to descend from something special? The disabled value now is "Body Text".


            

       

    A disabled "Outline level" usually means that you are looking at the setting for a paragraph to which a built-in heading style has been applied.

    Stefan Blom, Microsoft Word MVP
    Saturday, April 21, 2012 5:15 PM
  • Is there a way to override the outline level for built-in headings? I'm using Headings 8 and 9 for appendices and everything works as expected, minus the indentation level in the navigation pane.

    Sue

    Monday, November 19, 2012 7:46 PM
  • Is there a way to override the outline level for built-in headings? I'm using Headings 8 and 9 for appendices and everything works as expected, minus the indentation level in the navigation pane.

    Sue




    No, you can't change the outline level of built-in headings.

    However, if you want to change the TOC level for a heading, you can do that in the Table of Contents dialog box as you create the TOC.


    Stefan Blom, Microsoft Word MVP



    Monday, November 19, 2012 8:29 PM
  • Thank you. This is helpful.

    Monday, September 30, 2013 8:54 AM
  • I'm not sure what Stefan's comment above about text frames is suggesting - are you saying to insert the entire style text in successive frames, or inside the table?   I tried this and can't get the frame to behave inside the table - it either wants to jump to the side or the top.  I'm trying to create a glossary, with the term that's defined in the left column and the definition in the right column of a table.  It would be great to have the defined terms display underneath the parent heading, but you've indicated that Word just won't display headings in a Table.  Does Word 2013 do this?  Are there suggestions to achieve what I'm doing (i.e. a defined term and definition displaying side by side instead of on top of each other in separate paragraphs) without using a table?  I like the table format because it's easy to make insertions, it locks everything in place, and you can use header rows.  It's too bad that Word doesn't let this happen.
    • Edited by BuzzLS Thursday, November 07, 2013 4:37 PM
    Thursday, November 07, 2013 4:27 PM
  • I'm not sure what Stefan's comment above about text frames is suggesting - are you saying to insert the entire style text in successive frames, or inside the table?   I tried this and can't get the frame to behave inside the table - it either wants to jump to the side or the top.  I'm trying to create a glossary, with the term that's defined in the left column and the definition in the right column of a table.  It would be great to have the defined terms display underneath the parent heading, but you've indicated that Word just won't display headings in a Table.  Does Word 2013 do this?  Are there suggestions to achieve what I'm doing (i.e. a defined term and definition displaying side by side instead of on top of each other in separate paragraphs) without using a table?  I like the table format because it's easy to make insertions, it locks everything in place, and you can use header rows.  It's too bad that Word doesn't let this happen.



    A frame would have to be used in place of a table, so it wouldn't be helpful in your case.

    Are you saying that you are creating a glossary using heading styles? You could create a table of contents if you want links to the terms. (TOCs are hyperlinked by default.)


    Stefan Blom, Microsoft Word MVP


    Thursday, November 07, 2013 4:52 PM
  • No - my heading styles are numbered, and I didn't want the defined terms to have a list number.   So, I created a new "Definition heading" style based on Normal and followed Jay's instructions to JeanNGeorgia to assign a level to the styles.   As the others reported, this shows up if I use the style outside of the table, but not for the ones inside the table.   Too bad Word doesn't allow heading levels inside a table to display - that would be incredibly useful.   I'd upgrade to Word 2013 from 2010 if they fixed this!
    Thursday, November 07, 2013 4:57 PM
  • No - my heading styles are numbered, and I didn't want the defined terms to have a list number.   So, I created a new "Definition heading" style based on Normal and followed Jay's instructions to JeanNGeorgia to assign a level to the styles.   As the others reported, this shows up if I use the style outside of the table, but not for the ones inside the table.   Too bad Word doesn't allow heading levels inside a table to display - that would be incredibly useful.   I'd upgrade to Word 2013 from 2010 if they fixed this!



    You can create a TOC with custom styles, no matter what their outline level is, if that helps. However, as you already know, the Navigation pane can't be used to display anything inside table cells.


    Stefan Blom, Microsoft Word MVP

    Thursday, November 07, 2013 6:09 PM
  • I've got lots of defined terms with 1-2 sentences per definition, so a TOC doesn't seem like a good idea.  Do you know if Word 2013 fixed (or changed) the navigation pane issue?
    Thursday, November 07, 2013 6:18 PM
  • I've got lots of defined terms with 1-2 sentences per definition, so a TOC doesn't seem like a good idea.  Do you know if Word 2013 fixed (or changed) the navigation pane issue?



    You are right; a TOC doesn't sound ideal. (Of course, what I'm suggesting isn't really what a TOC is for, either.)

    The Navigation pane is unchanged in Word 2013, unfortunately.


    Stefan Blom, Microsoft Word MVP

    Thursday, November 07, 2013 6:23 PM
  • thank you so much for the answer...it's really help!  :>
    Thursday, January 16, 2014 2:27 AM