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Subnetting, private address, class c, 130 free addresses

    Question

  • Hello! I have run into a bit of a problem, or let's just say I can't seem to understand how this works, I will explain!

    I'd like to subnet my network, the IP i got from my ISP xxx.xx.xx.128/25 but apparantly I have to make this a private address first. The network should be in four subnets, 3 of these wirless, and one of the wireless connected to the wired subnet.

    Now, the wired network should hold about 82 addresses (included broadcast), and two of the wireless should hold about 132 and 122, the third wireless can be a smaller subnet.

    I have read on subnetting a class C network, but as I understand you can only make those as big as 128 addresses? and that's also only two subnets.

    I am confused, some guidance would be appreciated!

    Sunday, October 20, 2013 4:08 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    Sorry for replying so late.

    Yes, if you use a 24-bit subnet, you will have 254 hosts per Subnet. My meaning is that one of your subnet has 132 addresses, you can set 254 addresses per subnet. For example, 192.168.1.0/24, 192.168.2.0/24, 192.168.3.0/24, 192.168.4.0/24.

    In addition, if you set the IP range from 192.168.1.1-192.168.1.132, the subnet mask should be 255.255.255.0/24. I recommend you use netmask with 255.255.255.0 or /24 for the subnet with 132 addresses, and use the netmask with 255.255.255.128 or /25 for other subnets since they need IP addresses less than 126.

    More information:

    Subnetting

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc958834.aspx

    Best regards,

    Susie

    Monday, October 28, 2013 2:28 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    Based on my research, Class C addresses are used for small networks and it allows for 254 hosts per network at most. However, if you get IP addresses from ISP xxx.xx.xx.128/25, it means that you can have 128 IP addresses in each subnet.

    Of course, you can use private address from the 192.168.x.x with a 24-bit subnet to meet your needs. However, private addresses cannot be reached on the Internet. Therefore, Internet traffic from a host that has a private address must either send its requests to an application layer gateway (such as a proxy server), which has a valid public address, or have its private address translated into a valid public address by a NAT before it is sent over the Internet.

    Best regards,

    Susie

    Monday, October 21, 2013 9:15 AM
  • But wait! With a 24-bit subnet, wouldn't that be only 1 network with 254 hosts?

    Or is a /24 = two subnets on 254hosts each?

    What I need is 350hosts on 4 subnets, is this impossible when using a private IP?

    Okey, As I understand I can have two subnets on 192.168.1.0 and two subnets on 192.168.2.0, is this correct?


    • Edited by schvuu Thursday, October 24, 2013 9:45 PM
    Wednesday, October 23, 2013 10:56 AM
  • Hi,

    Sorry for replying so late.

    Yes, if you use a 24-bit subnet, you will have 254 hosts per Subnet. My meaning is that one of your subnet has 132 addresses, you can set 254 addresses per subnet. For example, 192.168.1.0/24, 192.168.2.0/24, 192.168.3.0/24, 192.168.4.0/24.

    In addition, if you set the IP range from 192.168.1.1-192.168.1.132, the subnet mask should be 255.255.255.0/24. I recommend you use netmask with 255.255.255.0 or /24 for the subnet with 132 addresses, and use the netmask with 255.255.255.128 or /25 for other subnets since they need IP addresses less than 126.

    More information:

    Subnetting

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc958834.aspx

    Best regards,

    Susie

    Monday, October 28, 2013 2:28 AM