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Move exchange 2010 to a different domain controller (active directory)

    Question

  • All.-

    We are in the process of changing our domain controller from DOMAIN-A (2008) to DOMAIN-B (2008). The plan is to migrate everything to DOMAIN-B and de-promote DOMAIN-A so it will not exist anymore after the migration. We have an Exchange 2010 and we know it is highly dependable on Active directory (domain controller) so we are wondering what will be the best approach to change our Exchange 2010 to our new domain DOMAIN-B.

    The only solution that we have thought of is to backup the mailboxes and then format the server, install the OS, install exchange again and restore the mailboxes.

    We are not sure if this is the best approach or if there are other solutions out there. Even the approach we have thought of, we are not sure the best way to do it.

    Any suggestions will be highly appreciated.

    Rgds

    Monday, November 21, 2011 12:43 PM

Answers

All replies

  • Hi,

    Without knowing any sizes and how many mailboxes you have there, I would suggest a cross forest migration.

    That's the correct way to go, and there are a lot of articles out there around it

    This can be done by using the native tools or 3rd part tools

     

    How many mailboxes?

    How much maildata?


    Jonas Andersson | Microsoft Community Contributor Award 2011 | MCITP: EMA 2007/2010 | Blog: http://www.testlabs.se/blog | Follow me on twitter: jonand82
    Monday, November 21, 2011 2:54 PM
  • The restore/backup method isn't going to work unless you use PST files.
    The Exchange databases belong to the original domain and therefore cannot be easily moved to a second domain.

    Be aware of the issues with going across to a new Forest. Written by the SBS team, still applies:

    http://blogs.technet.com/sbs/archive/2009/05/21/cannot-reply-to-old-emails-or-modify-old-calendar-items-after-pst-mail-migration.aspx

    If you have the hardware, then cross forest migration would probably be the most straight forward.

    Simon.


    Simon Butler, Exchange MVP
    Blog | Exchange Resources | In the UK? Hire Me.
    • Marked as answer by Frank.Wang Monday, November 28, 2011 1:53 AM
    Monday, November 21, 2011 3:16 PM
  • Hello Jonas.-

     

    Thank you for your quick reply Jonas. He goes the answers:

    - Around 100 Mailboxes

    - Around 1-2 GB each mail box, so around 150 GB of data.

    Please keep in mind, we would like to have the same server on a different domain controller (active directory). We do not have another server to do the transition, so we either use the same server and backups of the mailboxes or just change the same server to another domain if possible.

    The method you are suggesting is what we use to upgrade from Exchange 2003 to Exchange 2010 just that they were on the same domain, but the cross forest migration I have seen assumes you will be either upgrading exchange or moving to another server which we do not have.

    Any more ideas?

    Monday, November 21, 2011 3:18 PM
  • just change the same server to another domain if possible.

    Hi edu23more,

    "The domain rename operation is not supported in Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 or Exchange Server 2010."

    Introduction to Administering Active Directory Domain Rename
    As Simon said, if you only have one server, you have to backup users' mail items to PSTs. After you finish installing new AD and Exchange 2010, import items from PSTs to mailboxes.
    You can use cmdlet to bulk export items for users.
    • Marked as answer by Frank.Wang Monday, November 28, 2011 1:53 AM
    Wednesday, November 23, 2011 7:20 AM
  • I agree, don't to any domain rename actions since this is not supported and you could get very weird issues afterwards

    Instead, export to pst and then import on the other side

    Also follow the link Simon posted around ExchangeLegacyDN and X500 addresses, then you won't have any issues around replying old mails

     


    Jonas Andersson | Microsoft Community Contributor Award 2011 | MCITP: EMA 2007/2010 | Blog: http://www.testlabs.se/blog | Follow me on twitter: jonand82
    • Marked as answer by Frank.Wang Monday, November 28, 2011 1:53 AM
    Thursday, November 24, 2011 9:50 AM
  • I would seriously consider VMWare ESXi virtualization.

    Once you visualize, one server ( with decent memory ) can actually service the needs of at least 4 of your current servers.

    This approach will also allow you to snapshot a machine prior to an upgrade etc....

    I know it's our of scope of your question, but if you doing DOMAIN - A to DOMAIN - B opperations I think you are large enough to tackle visualization first.

    Wednesday, March 28, 2012 9:52 AM