none
Database Deletion Settings vs Retention Policies

    Question

  • I'm looking for more clarification on this issue beyond what was discussed here:

    Message Retention vs Delection Settings

    Specifically, through examples, could someone explain what happens if I:

    • Create (and apply) a Database Management Setting of 1) Keep Deleted Items for 60 days 2) Keep deleted mailbox for 365 days 3) Don't permanently delete UNCHECKED
    • Create (and apply) a Retention Policy on a mailbox in the Database with tag for 1) Never Delete

    or:

    • Create (and apply) a Database Management Setting of 1) Keep Deleted Items for 60 days 2) Keep deleted mailbox for 365 days 3) Don't permanently delete UNCHECKED
    • Create (and apply) a Retention Policy on a mailbox in the Database with tag for 1) 1 Month Delete

    or

    • Create (and apply) a Database Management Setting of 1) Keep Deleted Items for 60 days 2) Keep deleted mailbox for 365 days 3) Don't permanently delete UNCHECKED
    • Create (and apply) a Retention Policy on a mailbox in the Database with tag for 1) 6 Month Delete

    Thanks.

    Sunday, February 19, 2012 10:39 PM

Answers

  • Retention policy tags only control automated movement of data to the user's archive or being deleted. RPTs do not prevent a user from deleting data.

    If the user deletes an item and then empties their Deleted Items folder the item will stay in the dumpster for 30 days if the Keep Deleted Items is set to 30 days. After 30 days it will be removed from the dumpster. This is entirely independent of any RPT settings.


    Microsoft Premier Field Engineer, Exchange
    MCSA 2000/2003
    MCTS: Win Server 2008 AD, Configuration MCTS: Win Server 2008 Network Infrastructure, Configuration
    MCITP: Enterprise Messaging Administrator 2010
    Former Microsoft MVP, Exchange Server

    NOTICE: My posts are provided “AS IS” without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to the implied warranties of merchantability and/or fitness for a particular purpose.

    Monday, February 20, 2012 3:49 PM

All replies

  • Let's take a step back. Retention Tags should not be mixed up with database limits.

    Keep Deleted Items for ## Days refers to how long information is kept in a mailbox's dumpster, aka the Recoverable Items folder, before database online maintenance will purge them from the database.

    Don't permanently delete items until the database has been backed up simply means if you have not had a backup of the database then items in the dumpster cannot be purged even if the items are over the ## days of allowed dumpster age.


    Microsoft Premier Field Engineer, Exchange
    MCSA 2000/2003
    MCTS: Win Server 2008 AD, Configuration MCTS: Win Server 2008 Network Infrastructure, Configuration
    MCITP: Enterprise Messaging Administrator 2010
    Former Microsoft MVP, Exchange Server

    NOTICE: My posts are provided “AS IS” without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to the implied warranties of merchantability and/or fitness for a particular purpose.

    Monday, February 20, 2012 4:16 AM
  • That's what I'm trying to do. =)  The two on their face appear to conflict with one another in functionality; hence why I ask for clear examples of the two working with one another. (For example, if the retention policy says Never Delete and the Database says keep Deleted items for 30 days, what happens if a user deletes an item? It goes into the dumpster and sits there indefiinitely and disregards the 30 day delete setting on the database?) 
    Monday, February 20, 2012 3:44 PM
  • Retention policy tags only control automated movement of data to the user's archive or being deleted. RPTs do not prevent a user from deleting data.

    If the user deletes an item and then empties their Deleted Items folder the item will stay in the dumpster for 30 days if the Keep Deleted Items is set to 30 days. After 30 days it will be removed from the dumpster. This is entirely independent of any RPT settings.


    Microsoft Premier Field Engineer, Exchange
    MCSA 2000/2003
    MCTS: Win Server 2008 AD, Configuration MCTS: Win Server 2008 Network Infrastructure, Configuration
    MCITP: Enterprise Messaging Administrator 2010
    Former Microsoft MVP, Exchange Server

    NOTICE: My posts are provided “AS IS” without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to the implied warranties of merchantability and/or fitness for a particular purpose.

    Monday, February 20, 2012 3:49 PM