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How to stop scripts that keep on running

    Question

  • I tend to have a lot of IE9 windows and tabs open and find the active parts of those pages eat a lot of processor time and memory. I've found if I disable activex scripts the problem completely disappears. But then a lot of pages don't load right, display right, have buttons that don't work, etc. So I'd like scripts to run to get the page set up, but then kill any that keep running loops and updating things. Maybe a taskbar utility that would kill any scripts running at the moment, or an add-in that would let scripts run for the first minute a page is open and then stop them, or an add-in smart enough to detect looping and stop that. Any number of ways to achieve the same end. Anybody know of a tool to do this?
    Saturday, May 21, 2011 6:30 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

     

    Microsoft hasn’t the tool to do this.

     

    ActiveX controls is a small program building blocks, can serve to create distributed applications working over the internet through web browsers. Examples include customized applications for gathering data, viewing certain kinds of files, and displaying animation.

     

    If you open a lot of IE9 tabs, it will occupied a lot of processor and memory, that’s normal.

     

    You can set disable or enable ActiveX in IE\Tools\Internet Options\Security Settings\Custom level, but it may cause some pages display issue.

     

    And we also not recommend to use third party tools to do this, it may cause unexpected issue.

     

     

     

     

    Regards,

    Leo   Huang

     

     


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    Tuesday, May 24, 2011 3:17 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

     

    Microsoft hasn’t the tool to do this.

     

    ActiveX controls is a small program building blocks, can serve to create distributed applications working over the internet through web browsers. Examples include customized applications for gathering data, viewing certain kinds of files, and displaying animation.

     

    If you open a lot of IE9 tabs, it will occupied a lot of processor and memory, that’s normal.

     

    You can set disable or enable ActiveX in IE\Tools\Internet Options\Security Settings\Custom level, but it may cause some pages display issue.

     

    And we also not recommend to use third party tools to do this, it may cause unexpected issue.

     

     

     

     

    Regards,

    Leo   Huang

     

     


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    Tuesday, May 24, 2011 3:17 AM
  • Thanks for the info. Then ActiveX is being misused. The pages I have open are not ones that have any reason to have constantly updated info, like say a stock watch or something. They are not even the front page of news sites which you might expect to update with new stories. They're just a bunch of static news stories and other sources I have open to refer to while I work on a paper. For those dozen windows or tabs to eat up so much memory and time means they're running a ridiculous amount of stuff continually. MS plays a leading role in all this. They need to lead on how to make reasonable pages or provide tools for the users of their browser, like this kind of control of activex. Otherwise it's just going to grow and be one more way that stuff running under windows seems to be slow and fat. I'll look for some kind of control app among third party tools.
    Tuesday, May 24, 2011 4:48 AM
  • Looking a little further, here's part of the problem, IE9. One of the worst pages I encounter for scripts running and eating memory and cpu is

    www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein

    But try looking at how much memory or cpu it eats run under chrome or firefox. Still bad, but a fraction of what IE9 takes to run it. There's some kind of big problem with IE9.

    Looks like I'm switching back to FF both because it does somethings better itself, but also I can use the noscript add-on which comes closest to giving me the control I'd like to have.
    Monday, May 30, 2011 7:52 PM