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How to define "first 4-day week" as "first week of year" by default?

    Question

  • I'd like to know if it's possible to define "first 4-day week" as "first week of year" in Outlook 2007/2010 in system-wide scope.  This settings is found in Calendar's options.

    Actually, I see that every newly configured Outlook's calendar is using "Starts on Jan 1".  I suppose this setting is in client (Outlook) level.  Is there a tweak to change Outlook's default setting in system-wide scope?  Something like changing some registry values or some INF files, so that whoever logs in the computer gets the same default setting as "first 4-day week".

    Somebody told me, in another thread, that it's possible to do so using Group Policy since I'm using Exchange 2007 and AD 2008 but I have no idea how this is done.

    PS: No idea why Microsoft makes "Starts on Jan 1" as default setting.  ISO-8601 states that first 4-day week is the first week of the year.  It's time to follow some international standard.
    Thursday, July 29, 2010 4:03 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    I have seen your same question on Exchange Server forum (http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/exchangesvrgeneral/thread/7c30bc2d-022f-48fe-b6c5-70fbf51d6822) and an MVP has given the answer to this issue.

    I quoted the answer here in order to help more users with this same question. FYI.

    >I'd like to know if it's possible to define "first 4-day week" as "first week of year" in server-level.

    No, it's not.

    >This settings is found in Calendar's options. Actually, I see that every newly configured Outlook's calendar is using "Starts on Jan 1". I suppose this setting in client (Outlook) level.

    That's correct.

    >So maybe Exchange couldn't do anything to "push" this setting to Outlook clients. Or maybe a better question would be: Is there a tweak to change Outlook's default setting in system-wide scope?

    Check the MS Office groups. Most of Outlook's (and other applications)
    can have their setting altered and then have those changes pushed ot
    the clients through a policy.

    >Something like changing some registry values or some INF files, so that whoever logs in the computer gets the same default setting as "first 4-day week". PS: No idea why Microsoft makes "Starts on Jan 1" as default setting. ISO-8601 states that first 4-day week is the first week of the year. It's time to follow some international standard.
    ---
    Rich Matheisen
    MCSE+I, Exchange MVP

    Friday, July 30, 2010 8:46 AM
    Moderator
  • His third answer is too vague and ambiguous.  You see, he said "Most of Outlook's can have their setting altered..."  Can have?  Not simply have ?  Well, that would mean they might be there or they might be not.  You see how ambiguous his answer is.

    And the last part of that paragraph "... have those changes pushed to clients through a policy"  Well, it's just like a doctor telling someone "You have to eat good food to get better" without telling exactly what "good food" is.  So, what policy and what steps to use?  That's not clear.

    That's why I didn't want to reply to him as I'm persuaded that would be a waste of time.

    Friday, July 30, 2010 6:09 PM
  • Please review the following document and the various links.

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc179081.aspx

    This will help you get started with Group Policies, the various dependencies, and explain how to get the Office administrative templates. Please note that even though the way to configure group policies is the same, regardless of version, the actual administrative templates are Office version-specific... you will also need to download the Office 2007 version of the administrative templates.

    Abdias Ruiz [MSFT]

    Monday, August 02, 2010 10:12 PM
    Moderator
  • I unmarked Abdias' message as answer because the explanation is too vague.  I've spent 30 minutes reading the stuffs pointed by his links and I'm still lost.
    Wednesday, March 16, 2011 3:18 PM
  • If you're looking for the registry entry to do this try

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\14.0\Outlook\Options\Calendar

    the key is FirstWOY value 1, type REG_DWORD

    Good luck


    G North MMI
    Wednesday, March 16, 2011 3:46 PM
  • I've seen that registry entry already and tried it, but that doesn't work.  Well, even if it works, it's not system-wide, as I've asked in my OP.
    Thursday, March 17, 2011 9:45 AM
  • To apply it system wide you will need to use the administration tools you were refered to by Abdias in his previous post.

     


    G North MMI
    Thursday, March 17, 2011 10:47 AM
  • To apply it system wide you will need to use the administration tools you were refered to by Abdias in his previous post.

    ... which is incomprehensible.

    Isn't there some "quick start guide" instead of all these "blah blah blah"?

    Friday, March 18, 2011 1:44 PM
  • As it's quite a complex task I doubt you'll find much easy reading on the subject.  Have a look at this

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb742376.aspx#EBAA

     


    G North MMI
    Friday, March 18, 2011 2:43 PM
  • If you think that the "Use Group Policy to enforce Office 2010 settings" Technet article is incomprehensible for you, you should not even think about making any "System-Wide" changes to your environment.

    Anyway, a simple GPO Preference does the trick nicely.

    Monday, October 31, 2011 1:30 PM
  • I don't think the article is incomprehensible.  I found it's incomprehensible.

    It's like a novel: if the readers can't understand the story, it's not necessarily the problem from the readers.  It could also be the problem from the author.

    Monday, October 31, 2011 1:54 PM