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Degrees vs. Radians Excel 2007

    Question

  • Who knows how to change default from degrees to radians and vice versa? This is a constant fight. I have a several thousand dollars computer loaded with tens of thousands of dollars worth of software and this is a constant fight. All I want is what I paid for. To sit here with a $200 calculator and compute this stuff only to type values into Excel is insane.

    I'd tell you more specifically what version of Excel 2007 I have but the psychotic idiot in Redmond who hid everything does not want us to be able to see that info, so you can ask the psychotic idiot who hid that feature. I'm sure that wife beating child abuser feels better about it.

    Monday, May 31, 2010 3:46 PM

Answers

  • There is no way to change Excel's functions between using degrees or radians or vice versa.

    Each function specifies what units it wants its parameters in. The tooltip for the function or the Function Arguments dialog specifies the units where necessary.

    Excel expects its angles in Radians. If you use Degrees in your data you have to use the RADIANS() function to convert that data and/or use the DEGREES() function to convert back.

    Radians = Degrees * Pi/180

    Excel is not a pocket calculator.

    If column A contains an angle in degrees and column B should show the SIN of that angle, you'd set B2 to =SIN(RADIANS(A2))

    Excel's Trig functions have always used Radians because they were designed to be compatible with Lotus 1-2-3 which also used Radians but was invented first. If you want someone to blame, direct your anger back 25 years to Lotus, now part of IBM.


    Simon Jones http://pcpro.co.uk

    I agree that Excel is not a pocket calculator. Pocket calculators are designed by smart people and the user can change the default between degrees and radians simply. Pocket calculators don't hide things every time they change version number.There is no fluffy yellow button in the upper left hand corner of a pocket calculator. Pocket calculators don't bring about virus'. ...............

     

    It does help to see that I can save a cell by directly typing "=sin(radians(A2))" as ____ backwards as that seems.

     

    Thank you for the assistance.

    • Marked as answer by hmmmm..... _ Monday, May 31, 2010 10:23 PM
    Monday, May 31, 2010 10:22 PM

All replies

  • There is no way to change Excel's functions between using degrees or radians or vice versa.

    Each function specifies what units it wants its parameters in. The tooltip for the function or the Function Arguments dialog specifies the units where necessary.

    Excel expects its angles in Radians. If you use Degrees in your data you have to use the RADIANS() function to convert that data and/or use the DEGREES() function to convert back.

    Radians = Degrees * Pi/180

    Excel is not a pocket calculator.

    If column A contains an angle in degrees and column B should show the SIN of that angle, you'd set B2 to =SIN(RADIANS(A2))

    Excel's Trig functions have always used Radians because they were designed to be compatible with Lotus 1-2-3 which also used Radians but was invented first. If you want someone to blame, direct your anger back 25 years to Lotus, now part of IBM.


    Simon Jones http://pcpro.co.uk
    Monday, May 31, 2010 9:52 PM
  • There is no way to change Excel's functions between using degrees or radians or vice versa.

    Each function specifies what units it wants its parameters in. The tooltip for the function or the Function Arguments dialog specifies the units where necessary.

    Excel expects its angles in Radians. If you use Degrees in your data you have to use the RADIANS() function to convert that data and/or use the DEGREES() function to convert back.

    Radians = Degrees * Pi/180

    Excel is not a pocket calculator.

    If column A contains an angle in degrees and column B should show the SIN of that angle, you'd set B2 to =SIN(RADIANS(A2))

    Excel's Trig functions have always used Radians because they were designed to be compatible with Lotus 1-2-3 which also used Radians but was invented first. If you want someone to blame, direct your anger back 25 years to Lotus, now part of IBM.


    Simon Jones http://pcpro.co.uk

    I agree that Excel is not a pocket calculator. Pocket calculators are designed by smart people and the user can change the default between degrees and radians simply. Pocket calculators don't hide things every time they change version number.There is no fluffy yellow button in the upper left hand corner of a pocket calculator. Pocket calculators don't bring about virus'. ...............

     

    It does help to see that I can save a cell by directly typing "=sin(radians(A2))" as ____ backwards as that seems.

     

    Thank you for the assistance.

    • Marked as answer by hmmmm..... _ Monday, May 31, 2010 10:23 PM
    Monday, May 31, 2010 10:22 PM
  • Button>Excel Options>Resources is where you will find version numbers.

    Apparently you did not look very hard




    On Mon, 31 May 2010 15:46:30 +0000, hmmmm..... wrote:
    I'd tell you more specifically what version of Excel 2007 I have but the psychotic idiot in Redmond who hid everything does not want us to be able to see that info,


    Gord Dibben Microsoft Excel MVP
    Tuesday, June 01, 2010 2:14 PM
  • I agree. That this program does not give you the option is insane. That the calculator gives you greater freedom and utlity than Excel is something those idiots in Redmond should be ashamed of.
    Wednesday, September 11, 2013 4:48 PM
  • While I understand their use of radians, is it too difficult to add a couple more functions like sind(), cosd(), tand(), etc.,? If this was open-source a high-schooler could do it.
    Friday, November 22, 2013 10:26 PM