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Shared software

    Pergunta

  • If we have a software that must be accessed by several users. Can we install it on the SBSE or do we need an extra server for this?

    sexta-feira, 2 de março de 2012 18:45

Respostas

  • You cannot run SBSe - or any SBS as an RDP Server.

    So in order to share you application you will need to explore other options.

    Some apps work fine installed locally to each PC with the data stored on the server.

    Some apps require the data and the app to be installed on the same machine - in which case you would need to use RDS - or Windows Multipoint as a good alternative.


    Robert Pearman SBS MVP (2011) | www.titlerequired.com | www.itauthority.co.uk

    • Marcado como Resposta lensv sexta-feira, 9 de março de 2012 14:15
    segunda-feira, 5 de março de 2012 10:50
  • MultiPoint server is fine/supported/wonderful in any environment.  PAO is only cost effective if you need SQL server.  Otherwise, either Multipoint or Server Standard.


    Larry Struckmeyer[SBS-MVP]

    • Marcado como Resposta lensv sexta-feira, 9 de março de 2012 14:14
    segunda-feira, 5 de março de 2012 14:17
  • Not always no, because the cost of the hardware required to run WMS is not the same as an RDS Server, in fact a lot of the HP WMS 'Servers' are based on Desktop machines.

    Also with WMS you can get HP ROKs which provide the hardware and software at a reduced cost.

    With some of the Zero clients, which are direct connect 'stations' (which i think are around $100) some models even include the CAL.


    Robert Pearman SBS MVP (2011) | www.titlerequired.com | www.itauthority.co.uk

    • Marcado como Resposta lensv sexta-feira, 9 de março de 2012 14:12
    sexta-feira, 9 de março de 2012 10:17

Todas as Respostas

  • You are fine to install such software on the SBSe so long as the supplier of the software supports you (or you do not care) on this platform. 

    Some software will add additional loads on the server so monitor the effect on RAM and CPU, as well as disk I/O to determine if you will need to add RAM or provide faster disks or any such modifications.


    Larry Struckmeyer[SBS-MVP]

    • Marcado como Resposta Sean Zhu -Moderator segunda-feira, 5 de março de 2012 08:37
    • Não Marcado como Resposta lensv segunda-feira, 5 de março de 2012 08:45
    sábado, 3 de março de 2012 14:04
  • Okay, thanks! When I think about it, it might not be such a good idea after all. Letting a bunch of ordinary users in to the server smells like trouble ;)

    What are the other options... Premium add-on?

    domingo, 4 de março de 2012 09:08
  • Not sure I understand the basis of your objection.  Placing a shortcut to an executable on the users desktop is different from allowing users to browse the folder structure of the server, SBS or otherwise) at will.  The server, SBS or otherwise, allows only the access that the administrator grants, so if you launch a program's .exe from the desktop and it calls a data stream from the server (such as .mdf or sql), OR if progam design is such that the .exe is launched from the server via a shortcut, it makes NO difference.

    In the case of SBS-e or s, consider all the services that already allow user access "to the server", and you will realize that the purpose of servers is to serve.  But not to allow users access to the OS or to folders that the designers or the administrator do not grant access.  That is what shares are for, along with the appropriate share and security permissions.


    Larry Struckmeyer[SBS-MVP]

    domingo, 4 de março de 2012 17:23
  • I don't think that there are very many applications that will run just by adding a link to an executable file... I belive that most softwares require local execution and then an RDP session may be the only option (and that might not be such a good idea on a DC).

    segunda-feira, 5 de março de 2012 08:36
  • You cannot run SBSe - or any SBS as an RDP Server.

    So in order to share you application you will need to explore other options.

    Some apps work fine installed locally to each PC with the data stored on the server.

    Some apps require the data and the app to be installed on the same machine - in which case you would need to use RDS - or Windows Multipoint as a good alternative.


    Robert Pearman SBS MVP (2011) | www.titlerequired.com | www.itauthority.co.uk

    • Marcado como Resposta lensv sexta-feira, 9 de março de 2012 14:15
    segunda-feira, 5 de março de 2012 10:50
  • Yep! That's what I thought. Is it Premium Add-on (run as an RDS server) what we need then?

    (Multipoint seems to be ony for educational purposes)

    segunda-feira, 5 de março de 2012 13:23
  • MultiPoint server is fine/supported/wonderful in any environment.  PAO is only cost effective if you need SQL server.  Otherwise, either Multipoint or Server Standard.


    Larry Struckmeyer[SBS-MVP]

    • Marcado como Resposta lensv sexta-feira, 9 de março de 2012 14:14
    segunda-feira, 5 de março de 2012 14:17
  • Okay, where/how can we buy this Windows Multipoint (no resellers seems to have it for sale)?!?

    Is this solution installed on the SBSE or is it a full server installation that requires it's own hardware?

    segunda-feira, 5 de março de 2012 15:32
  • Dont forget to include the cost of RDS or Multipoint CALs.

    Robert Pearman SBS MVP (2011) | www.titlerequired.com | www.itauthority.co.uk

    segunda-feira, 5 de março de 2012 15:58
  • And the answers to my questions above are?

    segunda-feira, 5 de março de 2012 16:21
  • Sorry didnt see them.

    Full server  - own hardware required.

    AFAIK lots of places sell Multipoint, you may want to look at an HP ROK as it is a little cheaper.


    Robert Pearman SBS MVP (2011) | www.titlerequired.com | www.itauthority.co.uk

    segunda-feira, 5 de março de 2012 16:34
  • Is Multipoint really available for commercial use? I get the impression that it is for schools and educational purposes only...

     

    quarta-feira, 7 de março de 2012 06:45
  • It is available yes.

    It was primarily designed for Education in 2010, however with the release of 2011, and the integration with SBS Essentials, it is now also targeted at Small Business.

    Costs can compare equally between RDS and WMS, but WMS offers the addition of 'direct connect' stations which can be cheaper than a normal thin client so cost reduces that way.


    Robert Pearman SBS MVP (2011) | www.titlerequired.com | www.itauthority.co.uk

    quarta-feira, 7 de março de 2012 09:45
  • Okay, so if I understand this correctly Multipoint is like RDS built on/delivered with wizards. Are there any major differences besides that?

    /Ps. WMS - Windows Media Services?


    • Editado lensv quarta-feira, 7 de março de 2012 13:07
    quarta-feira, 7 de março de 2012 13:06
  • That about sums it up, the WMS (Windows Multipoint Server) Dashboard has the ability to view what any station is doing, and interact with it.

    Also you can project a station to other stations, which is good for training.


    Robert Pearman SBS MVP (2011) | www.titlerequired.com | www.itauthority.co.uk

    quarta-feira, 7 de março de 2012 14:07
  • Allright, thanks. Direct connections of workstations, is that done by USB (or some other physical connection)?

    Are there any limitations in the number of connecting devices (both direct and remote)?

    quarta-feira, 7 de março de 2012 14:38
  • WMS Premium is limited to 20 stations.

    Direct Connect is USB/VGA

    I am by no means a WMS expert though, there are plenty of resources out there for WMS.


    Robert Pearman SBS MVP (2011) | www.titlerequired.com | www.itauthority.co.uk

    quarta-feira, 7 de março de 2012 15:26
  • So, if there are 21 users needing access to this machine, the adviced product would be a standard Windows Server with RDS. Is that correct?
    • Editado lensv quarta-feira, 7 de março de 2012 15:45
    quarta-feira, 7 de março de 2012 15:44
  • Well no, i would not advise putting more than 15 users per box, so you could actually have 2 Multipoint servers.

    Robert Pearman SBS MVP (2011) | www.titlerequired.com | www.itauthority.co.uk

    quarta-feira, 7 de março de 2012 15:57
  • Well no, i would not advise putting more than 15 users per box, so you could actually have 2 Multipoint servers.

    Robert Pearman SBS MVP (2011) | www.titlerequired.com | www.itauthority.co.uk

    Hmm... Wouldn't that be a "bit" more expensive than running one single RDS, since you'll need two licenses and two physical servers?

    quarta-feira, 7 de março de 2012 16:05
  • Hi, for other Windows Multipoint Server related issues, you can post to the following forum:

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/windowsmultipointserver/threads

    Thanks.


    Sean Zhu

    TechNet Community Support

    sexta-feira, 9 de março de 2012 07:58
  • Okay thanks,

    But I'd still like to straight out the questsions here before we close this thread (WMS vs. RDS).

    sexta-feira, 9 de março de 2012 08:06
  • Not always no, because the cost of the hardware required to run WMS is not the same as an RDS Server, in fact a lot of the HP WMS 'Servers' are based on Desktop machines.

    Also with WMS you can get HP ROKs which provide the hardware and software at a reduced cost.

    With some of the Zero clients, which are direct connect 'stations' (which i think are around $100) some models even include the CAL.


    Robert Pearman SBS MVP (2011) | www.titlerequired.com | www.itauthority.co.uk

    • Marcado como Resposta lensv sexta-feira, 9 de março de 2012 14:12
    sexta-feira, 9 de março de 2012 10:17
  • Got it!

    With that perspective I can see your point. In some cases it might be more cost effective with two simple machines running WMS. In others, where reliant hardware is prioritized Windows Server with RDS should be the preferred choice.

    sexta-feira, 9 de março de 2012 13:42