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SSIS Port

    Question

  • Hi:

    Just wanted to find out what port does SSIS utilizes when communicated with a remote SQL Server. Is it 1434, 1433 or something? I have a SSIS Package on Server 1, which which does inserts on SQL DB on Server 2.  I think  between Server 1 and Server 2, some ports are being blocked because the 2 servers are separated by a firewall. When SSIS makes connection to Server 2 (SQL), what ports does it use? Also, any other tips would also help. Here is the error I am getting:


    Cannot connect to 10.xx.xx.xx.

    ===================================

    An error has occurred while establishing a connection to the server.  When connecting to SQL Server 2005, this failure may be caused by the fact that under the default settings SQL Server does not allow remote connections. (provider: Named Pipes Provider, error: 40 - Could not open a connection to SQL Server) (.Net SqlClient Data Provider)

    Tuesday, January 23, 2007 2:24 PM

Answers

  • I believe it uses the same port as what Management Studio would use.  Can you run a query in that tool against Server2 from Server1?

    1433 should be the default.
    Tuesday, January 23, 2007 2:31 PM
  •  MA2005 wrote:

    Here is more on this topic:

    Integration Services service always uses tcp port 135(RPC). You cannot specify a different port. I havent yet confirmed if a non-transactional package still utilizes DTC for communicating with remote servers. I am doing some testing right now, and will post back on this forum on the update.

    Refer to the following documentation on MSDN:

    http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms141198.aspx



    I want you to understand that you are talking two VERY different things here...  In order to communicate to a remote SSIS service, you need to have the RPC port open.  What that means is if I want to connect to SSIS through Management Studio, I have to have RPC open.

    HOWEVER, when an SSIS package runs and it hooks into a SQL Server database, it uses port 1433.  The execution of SSIS never uses port 135 (RPC).
    Wednesday, January 24, 2007 3:04 PM

All replies

  • I believe it uses the same port as what Management Studio would use.  Can you run a query in that tool against Server2 from Server1?

    1433 should be the default.
    Tuesday, January 23, 2007 2:31 PM
  • I am not able to connect at all, not even from the Management studio. What other ways I could possibly try. Besides 1433, what other port could be utilized by SSIS?
    Tuesday, January 23, 2007 2:37 PM
  • This isn't an SSIS issue.  If you can't connect via Management Studio, then yes, the ports are probably blocked.  Take it up with the network guys.
    Tuesday, January 23, 2007 2:42 PM
  • This is only applicable if you are connecting to a remote SSIS package:

    Here is more on this topic:

    Integration Services service always uses tcp port 135(RPC). You cannot specify a different port. I havent yet confirmed if a non-transactional package still utilizes DTC for communicating with remote servers. I am doing some testing right now, and will post back on this forum on the update.

    Refer to the following documentation on MSDN:

    http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms141198.aspx

     

    Wednesday, January 24, 2007 2:36 PM
  •  MA2005 wrote:

    Here is more on this topic:

    Integration Services service always uses tcp port 135(RPC). You cannot specify a different port. I havent yet confirmed if a non-transactional package still utilizes DTC for communicating with remote servers. I am doing some testing right now, and will post back on this forum on the update.

    Refer to the following documentation on MSDN:

    http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms141198.aspx



    I want you to understand that you are talking two VERY different things here...  In order to communicate to a remote SSIS service, you need to have the RPC port open.  What that means is if I want to connect to SSIS through Management Studio, I have to have RPC open.

    HOWEVER, when an SSIS package runs and it hooks into a SQL Server database, it uses port 1433.  The execution of SSIS never uses port 135 (RPC).
    Wednesday, January 24, 2007 3:04 PM
  • Thanks for the clarification, Phil. Your response really helped me, because I have been somewhat confused about this, and going back and forth with our Network Team. Thanks.

     

    Wednesday, January 24, 2007 3:14 PM
  • Hello Phil, sorry for bringing up an old thread here, but I found your reply most useful of all I have searched for.

    I am about to do the same connection with an SSIS-package (SQL-2005) but I am struggling with the port for the execution of this package.

     I want to transfer a database from server_2 to server_1, where server_1 is the one that hosts and initiate the SSIS-package on a scheduled basis. Server_1 and server_2 sits on two separate subnets with a "closed" firewall in-between. 

    You mention port 1433, but is this the only port needed to be opened for the traffic and data-transfer? I mean the traffic goes in both directions, so I just want to make sure there are no other ports for the actual data-transfer ( from server_2 to server_1 in my example).

    thx in advance..

    Peter

    Tuesday, February 01, 2011 10:33 AM
  • Hi Guys,

    I need your help to figure it out what Port does my Execute Process Task uses when it is invoked in my SSIS ETL server. How it works is:

    We have ETL server name "xxxxETL01" and we have SFTP server name "yyyySFTP01". I have one task called Execute Process Task in SSIS package where ETL is excuted in my ETL server but it invoke the WINSCP.exe from SFTP server. My network team is asking what is the port or firewall we need to open for your SSIS to invoke that exe file.  Because we gave the SFTP IP address to the 3rd party SFTP server/client to open their port for our SFTP server IP address.

    Could you please help if anyone have done the same thing...

     

    Thanks

    Ram..


    Rameshpgs
    Saturday, March 12, 2011 12:59 AM
  • In reply to some of those that asked me... 

        I read the post above/below and all the replies, but none of it was correct for my environment.  Yes that's correct I said
    it's all wrong, didn't help me in the least.  Get yourself a copy of the (now Microsoft) Process Explorer (procexp.exe) tool that
    Mark Russinovich wrote, it can show you the Port under tcp/ip once you connect to it for the first time on the local machine.  The process in question even in a multi-instance server is MsDtsSrvr.exe (for 2005, 2008 and 2008 R2) which on my machine was running on 49215,
    nothing like 1433.  I have 3 instances of SQL so having a single 1433 for TCP was impossible.  Once you know what port
    it's running under you have something a bit better to search for... OR you can write yourself a firewall exception by
    Process name and make it a domain only rule, or lock it down by the servers and processes in question that query that
    SQL Integration Service.

    John

    Monday, April 09, 2012 8:24 PM
  • In my opinion the question wrongly mixes in SSIS port which by the way is TCP 135, and this port cannot be changed. DCOM is used to access the service.

    The question is more like why a package cannot connect to server 2. And there could be reasons among which simply could be the security.


    Arthur My Blog

    Monday, April 09, 2012 9:01 PM