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SCSM lowest priority in the system center family?

    Question

  • Hi, this is more a discussion then a question. But is SCSM the product that gets the lowest attention? We are using it at my company and the product works fine but it is full with bugs etc. Now we did'nt get a CU3 to the product and now with R2 coming the change log is to be honest just a joke. Added support to Windows 2012 R2 and Windows 8.1.

    Should we be worried that they are not working to fix all problems that exists? We have memory leaks in change module, slow performance on the console etc.

    I review the known problems pre SP1 and after and it kinda looks the same as before SP1 so i am a little concerned about Microsofts focus in the system center family. If you look at VMM/SCOM they are getting loads of fixes. 

    Tuesday, September 10, 2013 5:46 PM

Answers

  • As Chris said (thanks Chris!) - There are dozens of bug fixes coming for SCSM 2012 R2 and some performance improvements.  There is more on the way as well.  While it is true that there hasn't been any new features released in SP1 or R2 for SCSM, the same could be pretty much said of SCOM, SCO, SCDPM, and SCAC.  The situation in the SC team for the last couple of cycles has been that new capabilities are focused on IaaS management with SCVMM keeping pace with the innovations in WS and WAP, SPF, SMA bringing Azure to run at service providers and enterprise on premise.  With a lot of progress in those areas complete now, we are starting to plan for vNext.  Many of the common issues/complaints raised by the community and customers around SCSM are on the table for discussion for vNext, but until plans are finalized we can't share anything specific.

    It's a matter of time/resources/priorities.  We needed to focus on IaaS for awhile to compete against VMware and the positive results of that are showing now in the hypervisor market share stats.

    Specifically regarding UR3...  We had some fixes ready to go but decided to hold them for R2 RTM to get more testing on them.

    Also, keep in mind that the product cycles have been much shorter for the last two cycles.  Delivering on a fast cadence generally means that we will ship less new stuff each time but will do so more often.

    Hope that gives some insight into what is going on here in Redmond...

    -Travis


    Travis Wright, Principal Program Manager, Microsoft

    Wednesday, September 11, 2013 9:05 PM
    Owner

All replies

  • Hey Thomas,

    I'm sure we'll get a lot of comments here, so let me kick it off :)

    Let me give my 2cents - outside perspective in, being that I don't work for MSFT but I am privy to some decent information.  I certainly understand where your comments come from and in large part agree with what you say.  

    The way I see it, the rub is that MSFT doesn't publicize what bug fixes, performance enhancements or general stability items they are addressing for their upcoming releases.  This is due to the ever changing amount of items they are working on. 

    I - just today - was informed and discovered some of the general and *big* bug fixes that MSFT has planned for SysCtr 2012 R2 Service Manager, and let me tell you the list is quite impressive.  I can without a doubt tell you that MSFT values Service Manager and is investing a good amount of money to continue to make the product better.

    Personally, I wasn't a fan of not having a UR3 either, but quite frankly I am sure they were putting effort towards some bigger fixes like the hotfix developed for the Set Health Service State on Secondary Management servers etc. ... just a guess, but I'll take that issue getting fixed any day :)

    As of today there are dozens of fixes and enhancements to Service Manager 2012 R2 - and a lot that make me very happy to see as a consultant too.  I like it when the product is as rock solid as possible, it makes my job much easier. 

    In the end we are forced to wait and see, after all, nobody wants to overpromise and under deliver... this leaves us in the trust but verify approach, and so far what I am seeing is some good verification that the focus is in making the product better, faster and more stable.

    In the future I expect to see some great new features and functionality in the product as well, but as always MSFT is tight-lipped on roadmap items here too.

    Hope that helps at least a little big.

    Thanks,

    Chris


    Chris Ross Principal Consultant - Cireson Check out our System Center App Store JOIN THE SCSM VIRTUAL USER GROUP

    Wednesday, September 11, 2013 2:52 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi, thanks for a fast and good response. Sounds good that SCSM is not forgotten by the other system center products. I guess we just have to wait and see what the future holds for SCSM.
    Wednesday, September 11, 2013 7:20 AM
  • As Chris said (thanks Chris!) - There are dozens of bug fixes coming for SCSM 2012 R2 and some performance improvements.  There is more on the way as well.  While it is true that there hasn't been any new features released in SP1 or R2 for SCSM, the same could be pretty much said of SCOM, SCO, SCDPM, and SCAC.  The situation in the SC team for the last couple of cycles has been that new capabilities are focused on IaaS management with SCVMM keeping pace with the innovations in WS and WAP, SPF, SMA bringing Azure to run at service providers and enterprise on premise.  With a lot of progress in those areas complete now, we are starting to plan for vNext.  Many of the common issues/complaints raised by the community and customers around SCSM are on the table for discussion for vNext, but until plans are finalized we can't share anything specific.

    It's a matter of time/resources/priorities.  We needed to focus on IaaS for awhile to compete against VMware and the positive results of that are showing now in the hypervisor market share stats.

    Specifically regarding UR3...  We had some fixes ready to go but decided to hold them for R2 RTM to get more testing on them.

    Also, keep in mind that the product cycles have been much shorter for the last two cycles.  Delivering on a fast cadence generally means that we will ship less new stuff each time but will do so more often.

    Hope that gives some insight into what is going on here in Redmond...

    -Travis


    Travis Wright, Principal Program Manager, Microsoft

    Wednesday, September 11, 2013 9:05 PM
    Owner