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Vista to Windows 7 Migration

    Question

  • Greetings,

    I'm a private tech consultant and am looking for a tool that will migrate files contained in the Program Files portfolio under Vista to the same under Windows 7.  Will the USMT  tool do this, or does MS have a similar or other tool to be used for a Windows 7 migration?  Or am I completely barking up the wrong tree?

    Regards....
    Saturday, September 12, 2009 2:18 PM

Answers

  • Hi Blair

    If you are wanting to migrate all of the files and user settings from Vista to Windows 7, you can use the Windows Easy Transfer (WET) utility or the User State Migration Tool (USMT). This depends on the situation.

    The WET is made for migrating a single or small number of computers and the USMT is designed to migrate a very large number of computers.

    These utilities are made to move user files and settings, but not the installed software programs or applications, when performing a clean install. If you want to migrate everything, including the installed software programs, then the best option is to perform an upgrade install and not a clean install.

    Windows Easy Transfer for Windows 7 - Windows Experience Blog

    User State Migration Tool 4.0 User's Guide

    Hope this helps.


    Thank You for testing Windows 7

    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Saturday, September 12, 2009 4:16 PM
    Moderator
  • I have Vista Ultimate 64-bit installed on my computer. If I buy the upgrade Windows 7, do I just install the upgrade Windows 7 and all my files and software remain, or do I have to reinstall drivers, software, etc.?

    Hi Cavicchi

    You can buy the Windows 7 Ultimate Upgrade and do this.

    From the Vista desktop, just insert the Windows 7 disk and select the Upgrade install. All of your programs and settings will remain intact.

    Download and install the  Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor  on that system.


    This utility will generate a report that identifies any known software/hardware/driver incompatibilities that may be present on that system.


    After you run the advisor, click the Save Report Button and save the file to the Desktop. Open the file there and read the report. If any incompatibilities are found it will give you advice what to do. There may be links to a website where you can get more information or download compatibility updates.


    Thank You for testing Windows 7

    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Saturday, September 12, 2009 7:35 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi Blair

    If you are wanting to migrate all of the files and user settings from Vista to Windows 7, you can use the Windows Easy Transfer (WET) utility or the User State Migration Tool (USMT). This depends on the situation.

    The WET is made for migrating a single or small number of computers and the USMT is designed to migrate a very large number of computers.

    These utilities are made to move user files and settings, but not the installed software programs or applications, when performing a clean install. If you want to migrate everything, including the installed software programs, then the best option is to perform an upgrade install and not a clean install.

    Windows Easy Transfer for Windows 7 - Windows Experience Blog

    User State Migration Tool 4.0 User's Guide

    Hope this helps.


    Thank You for testing Windows 7

    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Saturday, September 12, 2009 4:16 PM
    Moderator
  • I have Vista Ultimate 64-bit installed on my computer. If I buy the upgrade Windows 7, do I just install the upgrade Windows 7 and all my files and software remain, or do I have to reinstall drivers, software, etc.?
    Saturday, September 12, 2009 5:46 PM
  • I have Vista Ultimate 64-bit installed on my computer. If I buy the upgrade Windows 7, do I just install the upgrade Windows 7 and all my files and software remain, or do I have to reinstall drivers, software, etc.?

    Hi Cavicchi

    You can buy the Windows 7 Ultimate Upgrade and do this.

    From the Vista desktop, just insert the Windows 7 disk and select the Upgrade install. All of your programs and settings will remain intact.

    Download and install the  Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor  on that system.


    This utility will generate a report that identifies any known software/hardware/driver incompatibilities that may be present on that system.


    After you run the advisor, click the Save Report Button and save the file to the Desktop. Open the file there and read the report. If any incompatibilities are found it will give you advice what to do. There may be links to a website where you can get more information or download compatibility updates.


    Thank You for testing Windows 7

    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Saturday, September 12, 2009 7:35 PM
    Moderator
  • I built my own computer and installed Vista Ultimate 64-bit, and I see all upgrades refer to the manufacturer for upgrade information, which leaves me somewhat confused. I know there are upgrades being offered by, I think, amazon.com, so would buying an upgrade either from Microsoft or elsewhere work as you said above? One other question, do I have to buy Windows 7 Ultimate because I have Vista Ultimate 64-bit or could I upgrade with Windows 7 Home Premium?
    Saturday, September 12, 2009 10:34 PM
  • I discovered since I have Vista Ultimate, I must upgrade with Windows 7 Ultimate or do a clean install. I should have bought Vista Home Premium and save lots of money! On the other hand, I wonder just how well that upgrade goes. I know a clean install would be ideal, but I dislike having to install all my programs and files all over again; in addition, I imagine the cost for a clean install version will be much more than the upgrade--or does the upgrade also do a clean install?
    Sunday, September 13, 2009 2:41 AM
  • I discovered since I have Vista Ultimate, I must upgrade with Windows 7 Ultimate or do a clean install. I should have bought Vista Home Premium and save lots of money! On the other hand, I wonder just how well that upgrade goes. I know a clean install would be ideal, but I dislike having to install all my programs and files all over again; in addition, I imagine the cost for a clean install version will be much more than the upgrade--or does the upgrade also do a clean install?
    Hi

    Yes, the only upgrade version you would qualify for would be Windows 7 Ultimate, if you wanted to go to Home Premium, you would need to buy the full version, which would only be about 20 USD less than the W7 Ultimate upgrade. However, since you are the type of person who builds their own computers, you would probably miss a lot of the advanced tools and features that are missing from the Home Premium version.  :))

    Windows 7 Product Editions: A Comparison

    How you install the upgrade version is up to you. As long as you qualify for an upgrade version, you have the choice of performing a clean or in-place upgrade. The only requirement is that the install must be started from within a running instance of the qualifying version of Windows.

    What you would want to do is, once you have completed the install, with the upgrade version, and get it completely set up is to create a complete backup image of W7 that you could use to reinstall, if you ever have a disaster. Using this image would allow you to bypass reinstalling Vista to prove qualification to install the upgrade again.

    Hope this helps.

    Thank You for testing Windows 7

    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Sunday, September 13, 2009 4:30 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks for all the information. From what I see in Ultimate, I could be satisfied with Home Premium, even though I do build my own computers, which is not all that difficult. The reason I chose to build my own computer is quiet. I choose the fans, harddrives, PSU, CPU, type of cooling, etc.

    I have always done a clean install when upgrading to a new OS, so this will be the first time I am going the upgrade route by installing over Vista. When you say I have the choice of performing a clean or in-place upgrade, you must mean either buying the Full or Upgrade versions. Yes, the price difference between buying Home Premium Full versus Ultimate Upgrade is $20 dollars, but I wonder how well doing an upgrade works, meaning, end result the same as one would expect.

    I have Acronis True Image and occasionally make a new full image of my main hdd--I have two hdd's installed not in RAID but as separate drives, using one drive for images and data backup. So, I would not have a problem with making a full copy of W7, which I would do periodically.

    "Using this image would allow you to bypass reinstalling Vista to prove qualification to install the upgrade again." Since I do periodic images of my hard drive, there shouldn't be an issue using an image created long after the initial image you speak of, correct?
    Sunday, September 13, 2009 1:41 PM
  • Ronnie,

    Thanks for the advice above....... I'm not very good with command line tools such as the USMT so I'm trying the Windows Easy Transfer Tool which I downloaded and tried to install.  I'm using one of my own PC's as a test bed and can't get the tool to install (trfcable_64.exe)  it's telling me "Not enough storage available to process this command."  I have 355 GB space available on my C:\ drive and have two other external drives connected with about the same or more space available.  Any suggestions?

    Regards..... Blair
    Thursday, September 17, 2009 10:07 AM
  • Along these same lines, we are another user who wishes to do an in place upgrade of about 700 computers from Vista to Windows 7 however I cannot find any information on how to build an answer file that works with an upgrade. Every thing I read ends up instead with creation of a new image that gets pushed down. We want to build an answer file to kick off the upgrade and provide the  MAK license if we can rather than having to sit down and select upgrade and answer the few questions on each of 700 machines. The computer names, users, files, everything will remain the same except the OS will move from Vista to W7. 

    Thursday, September 17, 2009 5:22 PM