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Segmentation Vs Fragmentation

    Question

  • A salesperson at a well known retailer told me that segmentation is different than fragmentation and there are no segmentation solutions available to the public. This sounds suspicious to me. Does anyone know about this sort of thing?

    • Moved by Carey FrischMVP, Moderator Thursday, June 30, 2011 4:51 AM Moved to more appropriate forum category (From:Windows Vista Announcements)
    Thursday, June 30, 2011 3:01 AM

Answers

  • On Thu, 30 Jun 2011 18:54:33 +0000, Bill R TechSpec wrote:

    A salesperson at a well known retailer told me that segmentation is different than fragmentation and there are no segmentation solutions available to the public. This sounds suspicious to me. Does anyone know about this sort of thing?

    Sounds like the salesman was confused on this.

    I'll just add one more point. Computer sales people at most retailers
    (especially the well-known ones) typically make very little money.
    They are hired because they are willing to accept a low salary, not
    because they know a lot about computers.

    So they are usually among the worst possible sources of information.


    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP
    Thursday, June 30, 2011 9:10 PM

All replies

  • segmentation=partition =>use disk management or diskpart or third party tools

    fragmentation=order of data on a hard drive =>use disk defragmenter in disk tools or third party tools

    You have received an unkind response. Tools are available in Windows.


    Thursday, June 30, 2011 12:02 PM
  • On Thu, 30 Jun 2011 12:02:21 +0000, Nano Warp wrote:

    segmentation=partition =>use disk management or diskpart or third party tools

    fragmentation=order of data on a hard drive =>use disk defragmenter in disk tools or third party tools

    You have received an unkind response. Tools are available in Windows.

    I mostly agree, but let me clarify what fragmentation is. It's not
    really the order of the data; it's having the pieces of data that make
    up a file not all being contiguous with each other.
    So if you have three pieces of a single file, it's most efficient if
    they are 111112222233333; but if they are
    11111aaaaabbbbb22222ddddd33333, the file is fragmented and access to
    it is less efficient, because it takes time for the head to move to
    pass over aaaaa, bbbbb, and ddddd.


    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP
    Thursday, June 30, 2011 4:28 PM
  • A salesperson at a well known retailer told me that segmentation is different than fragmentation and there are no segmentation solutions available to the public. This sounds suspicious to me. Does anyone know about this sort of thing?

    Sounds like the salesman was confused on this.

    As Nano Warp points out, segmentation has to do with partitions, and for this you can use built-in tools via disk management (Start > Right Click "Computer" or "My Computer" > select "Manage" > select "Disk Management" > Right Click drive you want to re-size or "re-segment" > select "Shrink volume" or "Extend Volume" as appropriate and follow directions), or you can use third party programs to re-segment your disks. Plenty of software choices around.

    As K Blake points out disk fragmentation has to do with file pieces not being contiguous or next to each other.

    It is basically non-contiguous pieces of files and free space randomly scattered across a disk. It takes longer to access a file and also to write it in pieces -- and since some files can be broken into thousands of pieces (I have seen one file broken into more than 14,000 pieces), the disk gets a lot more use than needed, causing more wear and tear.

    There is a lot of information on fragmentation and how to deal with it with defrag at the Defragmentation Information Center here: http://www.diskeeper.com/defrag/defragmentation-center/

    ..


    Thursday, June 30, 2011 6:54 PM
  • On Thu, 30 Jun 2011 18:54:33 +0000, Bill R TechSpec wrote:

    A salesperson at a well known retailer told me that segmentation is different than fragmentation and there are no segmentation solutions available to the public. This sounds suspicious to me. Does anyone know about this sort of thing?

    Sounds like the salesman was confused on this.

    I'll just add one more point. Computer sales people at most retailers
    (especially the well-known ones) typically make very little money.
    They are hired because they are willing to accept a low salary, not
    because they know a lot about computers.

    So they are usually among the worst possible sources of information.


    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP
    Thursday, June 30, 2011 9:10 PM