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OEM License vs. Volume License

    Question

  • Hi Everyone,

    I've seen versions of this question asked before, but no one ever seems real certain of the answer, so I'll ask again :-)

    When our organization purchases new computers with an OEM copy of Windows 7 Professional installed and activated, do we need to purchase volume licenses of Windows 7 Professional to "legally" roll out our customized image to them?

    My understanding is "yes", but that goes back to the Windows XP days where OEM licenses could not legally be duplicated.  The interwebs are full of conflicting information pertaining to Windows 7 and OEM vs. volume licensing, so if anyone can shed some light on this, I'd appreciate it!

    j.
    Tuesday, January 26, 2010 4:20 PM

Answers

  • The ONLY place to get the right answer is Microsoft.
    http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/resources/faq.mspx

      What are the different ways to license Microsoft software?
    A.

    Full Packaged Product (FPP): Boxed, shrink-wrapped software. Licenses for this type of software are acquired through retail outlets or through resellers. FPP is for consumers who are looking for a small number of software licenses. You can purchase both full versions and upgrades of software through FPP.

    OEM/System Builder: OEM and OEM System Builder software is preinstalled on a new PC.

    Volume Licensing programs: For organizations that use multiple copies of Microsoft software, Volume Licensing is a flexible and economical way to acquire from five to thousands of licenses for software. Volume Licensing agreements, including Academic Volume Licenses, do not offer the full license for Windows Client operating systems; Volume Licensing covers only Windows Client upgrades. The full operating system license must be acquired as FPP or pre-installed by an OEM or System Builder.

    Tuesday, January 26, 2010 5:04 PM

All replies

  • The ONLY place to get the right answer is Microsoft.
    http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/resources/faq.mspx

      What are the different ways to license Microsoft software?
    A.

    Full Packaged Product (FPP): Boxed, shrink-wrapped software. Licenses for this type of software are acquired through retail outlets or through resellers. FPP is for consumers who are looking for a small number of software licenses. You can purchase both full versions and upgrades of software through FPP.

    OEM/System Builder: OEM and OEM System Builder software is preinstalled on a new PC.

    Volume Licensing programs: For organizations that use multiple copies of Microsoft software, Volume Licensing is a flexible and economical way to acquire from five to thousands of licenses for software. Volume Licensing agreements, including Academic Volume Licenses, do not offer the full license for Windows Client operating systems; Volume Licensing covers only Windows Client upgrades. The full operating system license must be acquired as FPP or pre-installed by an OEM or System Builder.

    Tuesday, January 26, 2010 5:04 PM
  • Talk to your OEM representative what your intentions are and contact Microsoft. That can be worked out. I had worked for an organization in which we supplied the custom image to the OEM and they applied it to our new purchases.
    MCSE, MCSA, MCDST [If this post helps to resolve your issue, please click the "Mark as Answer" or "Helpful" button at the top of this message. By marking a post as Answered, or Helpful you help others find the answer faster.]
    Tuesday, January 26, 2010 6:02 PM
  • Thanks for the info.  Also found a very helpful document called 'Re-imaging Rights' on Microsoft's VL site:
    http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/about-licensing/volume-licensing-briefs.aspx




    Wednesday, January 27, 2010 5:13 PM
  • Win 7 is a 2 part License. Part 1 is the OEM. For Organizations to avoid any trouble always purchase Windows Pro OEM on the Desktop or notebook. Otherwise you'll be purchasing a get genuine kit to "legalize" the pc. Ok now there is an OS on the hardware.

    The Volume Lic is part 2 an Upgrade of the OEM. This grants additional rights... read the PUR (Product Use Rights) if you have the time. Lastly you have a window of 60 days (see it once even 180 for vista) so this changes, after the purchase of a pc with windows 7 pro. In this window you can just purchase Software Assurance in the Volume License program of your choice and be granted the Upgrade lic. That is a less costly then purchasing the Upgrade Lic alone PLUS benefits.

    You can get a FPP, but who wants 1 box and lic cert for every pc (hard to manage)? Plus it cost more that OEM just to get the OS in the PC.

    S.

     

    Wednesday, February 02, 2011 1:56 PM