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Resource Monitor

    Question

  • In the CPU view of the monitor The blue line of graph monitors the Maximum Frequency. What is Maximum Frequency and what % (0-100) is best? Thank You

    Friday, July 22, 2011 1:54 AM

Answers

  • Maximum Frequency in Resource Monitor is the same as the Processor Performance\% of Maximum Frequency counter in Performance Monitor.

    For example if you have a 2.5 ghz processor which is running at 800 mhz then % of Maximum Frequency = 800/2500 = 31%. So the processor is running at 31%, or 800 mhz, of the processor's maximum frequency  of 2500 mhz (2.5 ghz).

    The "best" percentage of maximum frequency is subjective. Basically, you want the CPU running at a frequency that is fast enough to do what you want while using the least amount of power so it doesn't drain your battery or increase your electric bill unnecessarily.

    Your power plan in Windows is part of what determines the frequency as well as settings in the computer's BIOS.

    Take a look at the section Processor power management (PPM) may cause CPU utilization to appear artificially high in this article:

    Interpreting CPU Utilization for Performance Analysis
    http://blogs.technet.com/b/winserverperformance/archive/2009/08/06/interpreting-cpu-utilization-for-performance-analysis.aspx

     

     

     

    • Marked as answer by moman1101 Friday, July 22, 2011 6:39 PM
    Friday, July 22, 2011 4:42 AM

All replies

  • Maximum Frequency in Resource Monitor is the same as the Processor Performance\% of Maximum Frequency counter in Performance Monitor.

    For example if you have a 2.5 ghz processor which is running at 800 mhz then % of Maximum Frequency = 800/2500 = 31%. So the processor is running at 31%, or 800 mhz, of the processor's maximum frequency  of 2500 mhz (2.5 ghz).

    The "best" percentage of maximum frequency is subjective. Basically, you want the CPU running at a frequency that is fast enough to do what you want while using the least amount of power so it doesn't drain your battery or increase your electric bill unnecessarily.

    Your power plan in Windows is part of what determines the frequency as well as settings in the computer's BIOS.

    Take a look at the section Processor power management (PPM) may cause CPU utilization to appear artificially high in this article:

    Interpreting CPU Utilization for Performance Analysis
    http://blogs.technet.com/b/winserverperformance/archive/2009/08/06/interpreting-cpu-utilization-for-performance-analysis.aspx

     

     

     

    • Marked as answer by moman1101 Friday, July 22, 2011 6:39 PM
    Friday, July 22, 2011 4:42 AM
  • Thank You

    The article explains things very well.

    Again Thanks


    David
    Friday, July 22, 2011 6:38 PM