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UAC ideas

    General discussion

  • UAC blocks some programs starting when Windows starts.  There needs to be an 'allowed list' so programs can be added to it so these programs will run with admin privliges and no prompts.  This is to minimise prompts while maintaining good security and allowing some programs to run on start up without being blocked.

    Firewall software has a list of allowed programs and firewalls only prompt once once the program has been granted permission to have access all the time.  The UAC should use a similar layout to controll programs while minimising prompts.
    Monday, February 16, 2009 2:45 AM

All replies

  • SO far I uninstalled Windows 7.
    My problem is with the UAC and other security features Microsoft has plagued it's OS with.

    I installed Windows 7 after reading about the supposed improved UAC which is why I uninstalled Windows Vista and went back to XP.

    I download a program.
    I try to run the program.

    Are you sure you want to run program X.exe which was downloaded from the internet?
    Yes
    Program X.exe signed by corporation xyz wants to run on your computer, do you want to allow it to?
    Yes
    Program X.exe wants to make changes to your system, do you wish to allow this to happen?
    Yes
    Program X.exe wants access to the internet.
    Allow access this one time.

    Uninstalled the program, change UAC to the third setting which is supposed to be better.

    Are you sure you want to run program X.exe which was downloaded from the internet?
    Yes
    Program X.exe signed by corporation xyz wants to run on your computer, do you want to allow it to run?
    Yes
    Program X.exe wants to make changes to your system, do you wish to allow this to happen?
    Yes
    Program X.exe wants access to the internet.
    Allow access this one time.

    Uninstalled again and turned off UAC completely, rebooted.

    Are you sure you want to run program X.exe which was downloaded from the internet?
    Yes
    Program X.exe signed by corporation xyz wants to run on your computer, do you want to allow it to?
    Yes
    Program X.exe wants to make changes to your system, do you wish to allow this to happen?
    Yes
    Program X.exe wants access to the internet.
    Allow access this one time.

    This is off memory, but if I remember correctly, in order to try and install a program it took me 5 additional clicks, not just the 4 I listed, there seems to have been one more, and it was for ALL settings of UAC. If this is what it will be like I will stick with windows XP. I spent in excess of $500 getting two retail Vista Ultimates a week or so after launch of Vista, and they were uninstalled 1 week and a couple months later. My wife has a higher tolerance for the nagging system than I do, but after a while I just got sick and tired of doing technical support for software I just plain HATED. It refused to work well on the home network, it would not share printers, it would not share hard drives, it would be there one minute, gone the next. Windows XP does not exhibit any of these problems. If the printer is there one day, it is there every day thereafter, the same with shared folders, once shared it remains available.

    If windows wants to improve UAC what they need to do is have a setting that basically says, if the Antivirus software does not send a warning to the OS, then one click is all you need to install the program. The next step would be to have the system make system restore points that are 128bit or even higher encrypted that users can use to recover from a virus. This along with frequent antivirus updates would stop almost all the problems from virus's, as in that as soon as a new virus comes out, it only takes a little while for the antivirus updates to inform Windows there is a virus, what the virus is, if the virus cannot be removed normally, then Windows searches it's system restore points for a virus free version and requests the user to do a restore to that point. Because the restore points are encrypted a virus would not be capbable infecting the restore database.

    I do not want to click 2, 3, 4 or 5 times order to play my game, install software or do anything else on my computer. If Microsoft thinks it can sell me another version of Windows Vista that is just rebranded, they can think again.
    Monday, February 16, 2009 9:11 PM
  • Greetings, 

    I'm not sure which software were you trying to download and install under W7, but after reading your post I did some tests about UAC. Let me point out what I got:

    1. UAC Settings = Default - Notify me only when programs try to make changes to my computer

    Software: Java Update 12
    Known Publisher: Yes
    Internet Explorer Security Warnings: 1 - when clicking "run" button.
    UAC questions: 1 - "Do you want to allow the following program to make changes to this computer?"

    Software: 7Zip 4.65
    Known Publisher: No
    Internet Explorer Security Warnings: 1 - when clicking "run" button.
    UAC Questions: 1 - "Do you want to allow the following program from an unknown publisher to make changes to this computer?"

    Total of clicks for this settings for both (known/unknown publisher): 2

    2. UAC Settings = Notify me when programs try to make changes to my computer (do not dim my desktop)

    Software: The Gimp 2.6.5
    Known Publisher: Yes
    Internet Explorer Security Warnings: 1 - when clicking "run" button.
    UAC questions: 1 - same as above

    Total of clicks for this settings for a known publisher: 2

    3. UAC Settings = Never (requests restart)

    Software: Spyware Terminator 2.5.5.166
    Known Publisher: Yes
    Internet Explorer Security Warnings: 1 - when clicking "run" button.
    UAC questions: NIL

    Total of clicks for this settings for a known publisher: 1

    So, for me, it's pointless the few number of clicks on behalf the security. Again, I don't know which software you were trying to install tho.

    Hope this helps.


    W7 Beta running on an AMD Semprom 3200+ (1800Mhz) with 2 Gbs of RAM and a built-in Nvidia 6100 VGA, and mate, it runs like a charm!
    Tuesday, February 17, 2009 6:44 PM
  • Every time software on my computer wants to access the internet i DON'T get a prompt from my firewall software.  I get one the first time on new software then the firewall remembers the program and allows it to run in future instances.

    Why the hell can't Window's UAC remember software that is allowed and never ever prompt the user to run it again!

    The UAC needs an allowed software list so users can add progreams to that list meaning Windows will run the program as admin but won't prompt the user when it's run.

    The solution is sooooooooo simple!
    Wednesday, February 18, 2009 12:13 AM
  • Personally, I don't like the idea of having a common white list/black list of software for all the security layers - UAC, firewall and the Spyware/Malware Scanner - in order to reduce the warning messages.

    I really do understand the serious problems this could cause by any malware/spyware. They will be able to break all the security layers in one single step and I think that this is the main reason why Microsoft is implementing security in this way, on behalf of a more secure and reliable OS.

    However, as they did with UAC, I don't know if this could be implemented for users who don't want to say "Yes" everytime they try to run a program: a common white list to run as administrator, and avoid all those warning messages.

    But always keeping in mind the risks this entails.


    W7 Beta running on an AMD Semprom 3200+ (1800Mhz) with 2 Gbs of RAM and a built-in Nvidia 6100 VGA, and mate, it runs like a charm!
    Wednesday, February 18, 2009 8:10 AM
  • Surely the database of programs marked as 'allowed' would be heavily encrypted so malware couldn't harm it...

    Surely it would be set up if the data base was destroyed/corrupted it would just be whiped and the user would have to start again with a blank list of allowed programs.

    The option of being able to add software to a list that allows the software to run as admin in future instances without prompts or blocking at windows start up, would be an optional setting that the admin could controll.
    Wednesday, February 18, 2009 9:36 PM
  • One of UAC's core purposes is being overlooked here though: UAC makes application developers write better code.

    For decades, developers of apps for Windows have made applications that required administrator rights for no reason. UAC has made an enormous impact on that in only a couple years, with developers realising that if users are annoyed using their applications, they will go use someone else's application that does not annoy them. What is merely annoying to the user is also horrendous coding security practice, as a user must be running or elevating to administrator for no reason - and most security holes these days are in applications, not operating systems.

    So if you give the developer the ability to simply mark his application to some whitelist, they have no impetous to write their application correctly and it will be insecure forever. Creating a whitelist is not a difficult task - it was not done for good reason.

    And the firewall-UAC situation is not perfectly analogous - it is configuration, just like setup. The same way that when an application is installed it needs admin rights one time and theoretically never asks you again, setting up the firewall is part of setup and config.

    If you are unhappy with UAC prompting, contact your software vendor and (politely) demand that they use safe and proper coding conventions.
    Ned Pyle [MSFT] - MS Enterprise Platforms Support - Beta Team
    Thursday, February 19, 2009 4:48 AM
  • As a sidenote, all those aforementioned applications I installed to test the UAC settings, don't prompt me to run as administrator everytime I run them. They simply start as always did in XP.

    Regards
    W7 Beta running on an AMD Semprom 3200+ (1800Mhz) with 2 Gbs of RAM and a built-in Nvidia 6100 VGA, and mate, it runs like a charm!
    Thursday, February 19, 2009 3:18 PM
  • Ned Pyle [MSFT] said:

    One of UAC's core purposes is being overlooked here though: UAC makes application developers write better code.

    <snip>


    Ned Pyle [MSFT] - MS Enterprise Platforms Support - Beta Team



    I can appreciate that, but we should not have to suffer as users because of poorly written programs.  Joe and Jane blow are not going to be contacting software vendors to complain about this, they're going to blame W7.

    Myself, I'm happy to turn UAC off, but I wish I didn't have to.
    Thursday, February 19, 2009 8:20 PM
  • Developers will only understand you protesting with your wallet. Make yourself heard by buying a better written product and letting the competitors know that they lost a sale.
    Ned Pyle [MSFT] - MS Enterprise Platforms Support - Beta Team
    Friday, February 20, 2009 3:14 AM
  • A Stoner said:

    SO far I uninstalled Windows 7.
    My problem is with the UAC and other security features Microsoft has plagued it's OS with.

    I installed Windows 7 after reading about the supposed improved UAC which is why I uninstalled Windows Vista and went back to XP.

    I download a program.
    I try to run the program.

    Are you sure you want to run program X.exe which was downloaded from the internet?
    Yes
    Program X.exe signed by corporation xyz wants to run on your computer, do you want to allow it to?
    Yes
    Program X.exe wants to make changes to your system, do you wish to allow this to happen?
    Yes
    Program X.exe wants access to the internet.
    Allow access this one time.

    Uninstalled the program, change UAC to the third setting which is supposed to be better.

    Are you sure you want to run program X.exe which was downloaded from the internet?
    Yes
    Program X.exe signed by corporation xyz wants to run on your computer, do you want to allow it to run?
    Yes
    Program X.exe wants to make changes to your system, do you wish to allow this to happen?
    Yes
    Program X.exe wants access to the internet.
    Allow access this one time.

    Uninstalled again and turned off UAC completely, rebooted.

    Are you sure you want to run program X.exe which was downloaded from the internet?
    Yes
    Program X.exe signed by corporation xyz wants to run on your computer, do you want to allow it to?
    Yes
    Program X.exe wants to make changes to your system, do you wish to allow this to happen?
    Yes
    Program X.exe wants access to the internet.
    Allow access this one time.

    This is off memory, but if I remember correctly, in order to try and install a program it took me 5 additional clicks, not just the 4 I listed, there seems to have been one more, and it was for ALL settings of UAC. If this is what it will be like I will stick with windows XP. I spent in excess of $500 getting two retail Vista Ultimates a week or so after launch of Vista, and they were uninstalled 1 week and a couple months later. My wife has a higher tolerance for the nagging system than I do, but after a while I just got sick and tired of doing technical support for software I just plain HATED. It refused to work well on the home network, it would not share printers, it would not share hard drives, it would be there one minute, gone the next. Windows XP does not exhibit any of these problems. If the printer is there one day, it is there every day thereafter, the same with shared folders, once shared it remains available.

    If windows wants to improve UAC what they need to do is have a setting that basically says, if the Antivirus software does not send a warning to the OS, then one click is all you need to install the program. The next step would be to have the system make system restore points that are 128bit or even higher encrypted that users can use to recover from a virus. This along with frequent antivirus updates would stop almost all the problems from virus's, as in that as soon as a new virus comes out, it only takes a little while for the antivirus updates to inform Windows there is a virus, what the virus is, if the virus cannot be removed normally, then Windows searches it's system restore points for a virus free version and requests the user to do a restore to that point. Because the restore points are encrypted a virus would not be capbable infecting the restore database.

    I do not want to click 2, 3, 4 or 5 times order to play my game, install software or do anything else on my computer. If Microsoft thinks it can sell me another version of Windows Vista that is just rebranded, they can think again.



    this si not true, thsi is a Vista UAC, not aWindows 7 UAC.... I have never got a "this one time" button an a program than needs to access the internet, just a "allow" and "deny" button....

    please,. don't just come here bashing something you have not even tried using....
    Friday, February 20, 2009 5:11 AM
  • The UAC needs and "Absolute Administrator" setting. I am far from being a power user but I'm not sasquatch either.

    I uninstalled a non-compliant program and went to make sure there was no trace of it left in my Program files; sure enough there was an empty folder. I tried to delete the folder and Windows 7 told me that I did not have the authority because I am no the "Admin" of this machine. My Windows 7 account is the only W7 account and it is the Admin account...why can't I delete this folder? It's empty. I like to keep exact track of what's on my machine and why it's there--even if it's an empty folder.

    texan4u
    Wednesday, February 25, 2009 8:22 PM
  • Have you tried a Run As Administrator with the cmd line and deleting the folder that way?  I would agree it should delete everything, however I have found with some applications (especially virus protect) they will always leave something behind, even in XP.  The overall concept and idea of UAC is based on two different roles within the Vista/Win 7 client.

    1.  Standard User
    2.  Administrator

    Everybody starts in the Standard User role and they will be prompted for Admin Approval for whatever needs to happen.  By doing the Run As . . . command you are forcing that issue.

    Good Luck.
    Sunday, March 01, 2009 3:26 AM
  • I have the UAC settings all the way up, as I WANT to be notified if malware is trying to make changes to my settings or computer. I don't want programs just installing themselves without my consent, so I like the notification feature. I've grown accustom to the notifications and it's not a problem for me. I can always change the settings if I want to, say if I'm installing a lot of software, but I have found it's not that really big of a deal. So I leave it all the way up.

    The UAC feature was a big selling point for me in Windows Vista, and I'm glad to see it in Windows 7 as well.
    Sunday, March 01, 2009 2:45 PM
  • Goorambatman said:

    UAC blocks some programs starting when Windows starts.  There needs to be an 'allowed list' so programs can be added to it so these programs will run with admin privliges and no prompts.  This is to minimise prompts while maintaining good security and allowing some programs to run on start up without being blocked.

    Firewall software has a list of allowed programs and firewalls only prompt once once the program has been granted permission to have access all the time.  The UAC should use a similar layout to controll programs while minimising prompts.



    Yes an 'allowed list' would be good and the easiest way could be a tick box, next to words like - I trust this program, don't ask me again. as below.

     

     

    Think that clicking yes every time just lulls me into a false sense of security.

    Tuesday, March 03, 2009 4:10 AM
  • I feel very safe and it's not a false safe. If my computer were to get compromised and a virus or browser hack was trying to change my settings or install something secretly, I get notified. I like that.

    I always felt safe in Vista too. I never had a virus or browser hack in Vista, but I did with XP.
     
    For the record, I've had Windows 7 on my computer since January 10th, and have not had one virus or browser hack effect my computer. It just hasn't been a problem at all.

    So I feel it's definitely helping.
    Tuesday, March 03, 2009 4:23 AM
  • Exactly my point duglhai_at_tnf!  That would be awesome!  This way I can feel safe without feeling annoyed :-D.
    Thursday, March 05, 2009 8:37 AM
  • Goorambatman said:

    Exactly my point duglhai_at_tnf!  That would be awesome!  This way I can feel safe without feeling annoyed :-D.



    Thanks for saying, am all choked up, much appreciated. :)))
    Thursday, March 05, 2009 11:11 AM
  • Goorambatman said:

    Every time software on my computer wants to access the internet i DON'T get a prompt from my firewall software.  I get one the first time on new software then the firewall remembers the program and allows it to run in future instances.

    Why the hell can't Window's UAC remember software that is allowed and never ever prompt the user to run it again!

    The UAC needs an allowed software list so users can add progreams to that list meaning Windows will run the program as admin but won't prompt the user when it's run.

    The solution is sooooooooo simple!



    The solution is not so simple as you think. What guarantees that malicious software
    cant add itself to this list that you are suggesting to create.? Think again man.
    Friday, March 06, 2009 12:00 PM
  • To be added to the list a program would have to pass UAC validitation in the first place and be accepted by the user. 

    The database would be encrypted and if the list was to be corrupted/tampered with Windows could simply erase the list and start from scratch instead of having possible errors/breaches.

    Anti-Virus software and Windows Defender could check the list for malicious software and notify users of the problem.  Users would have the option of having this feature turned on or off.

    That is the big one, many users have UAC turned off as they find it annoying.  At least these users could have a medium level of protection compared to very little/low.

    What stops malicious software from adding itself to Window's firewall list?
    Friday, March 06, 2009 10:24 PM
  • u r missing the whole point man... if there could be a tamper with it why have it in the first place? Firewall software bundled with Windows XP is not something u really would want to use.. You actually have a fault in ur suggestion rite there.... U said if the list was tampered with windows would start over from scratch again, which means u r just adding to the client's woes. They would have to face the prompts all over again, and so I dont see the need for malicious software to get added to that list anymore. In this manner they would have caused equivalant amount of pain to the user. Besides all of this ur suggestion will require that more code be added which could decrease efficiency. I think the UAC is at its best in Windows 7. I say microsoft has done its part all rite. The feature which allows UAC to notify only when programs make changes to the computer is great. Lookin forward to hearing from "Goorambatman"....
    Monday, March 09, 2009 4:10 PM
  • If the list was wiped by windows due to a corruption and the user would have to reply to prompts all over again this would still reduce the ammount of prompts greatly.  I like the UAC, i recon it was Vista's greatest feature by a long way but I am speakng for the many many users who hate the prompts.

    Maby one day there will be an answer for all this.

    Maby a password could be used when adding programs to the do not prompt list?  Maby the users password could be used to encrypt the database giving most databases a unique encryption?  Maby there could be a seperate wizard to add programs to this list that requires a prompt to be passed and a password...

    This thread is not about for or against the UAC.  It's about coming up with ideas and making it better.
    Tuesday, March 10, 2009 11:44 PM
  • Hey Don Donais. Thanks for the heads up. Haven't logged in here for a bit as I've been super busy with work--off shore. Yeah, I ended up going and using the command line to give my self Administrative Authority, then just deleting my other user account but keeping the files.

    I just get super annoyed at that UAC prompt thing. Being one who keeps absolute track of everything that's on my machine and using both Avira Antivir Premium and Spy Bot, I believe I can assume responsibility for  anything that goes wrong here and take whatever actions necessary to remedy them.

    Having no UAC and being absolute Admin on my machine are just my personal preferences.

    texan4u
    Friday, March 13, 2009 5:48 PM
  • Marsian40 said:

    Goorambatman said:

    Every time software on my computer wants to access the internet i DON'T get a prompt from my firewall software.  I get one the first time on new software then the firewall remembers the program and allows it to run in future instances.

    Why the hell can't Window's UAC remember software that is allowed and never ever prompt the user to run it again!

    The UAC needs an allowed software list so users can add progreams to that list meaning Windows will run the program as admin but won't prompt the user when it's run.

    The solution is sooooooooo simple!



    The solution is not so simple as you think. What guarantees that malicious software
    cant add itself to this list that you are suggesting to create.? Think again man.

    Oh so true. Hacks target Microsoft and it's products as opposed to Mac by a margin of like 100 to 1.

    The best protection is learning about the os you use and being able to recognize discrepancies. I've seen people just click the proceed thing on the UAC out of habit...it becomes an annoyance to a lot of people.

    A real, gifted hack can do just about anything. Don't be surprised if one day the UAC is compromised in some way shape or form.


    texan4u
    Friday, March 13, 2009 5:53 PM
  • What if there was an allow list, but a UAC prompt had to be passed to make changes and also Windows could force the user to type a password in to make changes...  What about a captcha to make changes?  Something like these things?
    Thursday, March 19, 2009 7:01 AM
  • May I suggest you remove all the locks on your house and your car, staple your phone number to all the public notice boards within 3o miles of your house, and simply hand out your personal information (p reprinted on a sheet) as fliers to every stranger you meet in the street.  Clearly Windows is not for you.  If you disagree with my above suggestions, and undoubtedly you will, then I exhort you to go at your first possible convenience to the nearest Apple dealer and buy a MAC.  An excellent machine and none of the nags Windows has, I think you will love it!

    Now, on a serious note:  I found the UAC slider to work just as promised.  The exception is if you have software that was not written properly by some one who was too lazy to do the proper research for the Windows rules of programming.

    If you merely click the shortcut for the software you wish to run at boot, and locate the executable and right-click that, then set it to run with administer privelidges, then place the shortcut into the startup folder, you will have no problems.  Hopefully a virus will never compromise one of those programs or one of their resource libraries.  But then again if it does, and you come here whining, I will expect the same level of response from Microsoft as you would get from the police if you do in fact follow my advice from the first paragraph.

    I wish you luck and peace in the hellish world you percieve the rest of us to work in on a daily basis.

    Computer software consultant for 27 years
    Thursday, May 07, 2009 8:54 PM
  • Just a thought for everyone who hates clicking stuff, and considers storing their files on a removable drive.  Consider using Windows SteadyState .  I have not tested it in Windows 7, but the places where Microsoft says it works, work perfectly.

    Before you flame me about this suggestion, read ALL the details about the product and related documentation.

    In my opinion it should be built into EVERY SINGLE computer that is out there. A feature that applies a solution like this to limited user accounts by default would be perfect.  This is truly a promising security solution in the making!

    There is always a way to do anything in IT, you just have to look for it.

    Computer software consultant for 27 years
    Thursday, May 07, 2009 9:05 PM
  • I concur, W7 could use a ZoneAlarm like interface which can modify its behavior for specific programs once they've been encountered. A second solution (probably less bloat) would be to let UAC run with general settings, in the event a user prompt is to be displayed, check against a (right click/file property) user checkbox, when checked, UAC automates "allow/yes". Admittedly this "Disable Prompts" checkbox should itself require a UAC prompt to change. I have trouble over the idea of turning off all UAC notification for all programs. I also have trouble accepting that I might have to deal with a UAC prompt every time I run a commonly used program (such as a media player, which because it supports a sophisticated 3rd party audio DSP plugin, I prefer over WMP). The media player itself is updated, but its the plugin (not likely to be updated) which needs access to it's settings files and thus triggers UAC prompts.
    Friday, May 08, 2009 10:10 AM
  • Most people these days want to use open source software so the commercial expedient of voting with your wallet applies less and less.
    Tuesday, October 20, 2009 10:56 AM
  • My biggest beef is not the mouse clicks but rather than programmes run from shell extensions, and which need admin permission, dont even prompt to allow them to run - they just dont work - eraser being a good example of this but basically it seems to affect any tool that needs deep access like this
    Tuesday, October 20, 2009 10:59 AM
  • I don't really have any problems with UAC for the most part, though my largest problem is when going to start, run, opening notepad, and then trying to edit a configuration file (hosts file) or other file in Program Files and Notepad fails to save because of UAC.

    I of course have created an Administrative notepad shortcut, but it still is only slightly inconvenient.

    I otherwise kick UAC to its highest level on both Vista and 7.
    Tuesday, October 20, 2009 12:29 PM
  • I have very similar issues with Windows 7 as well.  I too purchased Windows 7 after Dell tech support said the problems I'm having downloading executable files would be resolved with W7 (I had W-vista).  Spent more money.  Still have the same problems.  I'm going to see if someone can sell me their old copy of XP and I'll install that on my new Dell laptop!
    Friday, November 06, 2009 9:01 PM
  • Unfortunately, my experience is different, the software either:  1) never downloads or; 2) the file gets corrupted so that I cannot run it.  I've tried turning off UAC, setting the settings as low as possible and I still have downloading issues.
    Friday, November 06, 2009 9:02 PM
  • whats the deal with a couple of clicks ? have anyone counted how many clicks u do while visiting a web site for example?
    why would microsoft create a new OS with xp security level? that is totally pointless!!
    some ppl just want to sit in front of pc and let the pc think for them if posssible...
    anyways i cant understand what is so bad in double clicking?
    All my best,
    RR
    Saturday, November 07, 2009 1:58 AM
  • I disabled UAC in Vista and never had a problem. While UAC is a bit better in Window 7, I still find it problematic, couldn't register an .ocx file to make the program work, same .ocx file I used in Vista. So, once again I disabled UAC and do not expect any problems.
    Saturday, November 07, 2009 8:08 PM
  • Well maybe u dun know whats going on in the background so u think everything is ok,and disabling UAC is totally pointless,UAC is one of the most important security feature that must be turned on ,in order to make sure when some admin action is launched UAC prompts the user to show that some app is requiring admin credentials to install etc...
    maybe if u right click on the OCX file and go through its properties then u choose run this app as admin...and then double click to install ,a prompt windows will pop up and then just allow and then everything should be fine!
    now we cant disable UAC or make it a bit easier just to make it more confortable and leaving the OS less secure..
    thats my opinion..
    Regards,
    RR
    Saturday, November 07, 2009 9:12 PM
  • I agree with the idea of an allow list or safe programs list, I just upgraded to Win 7 last week and I have to authorize Acrobat every time I open a PDF!
    Monday, November 30, 2009 4:00 PM
  • "I have the UAC settings all the way up, as I WANT to be notified if malware is trying to make changes to my settings or computer. I don't want programs just installing themselves without my consent, so I like the notification feature. I've grown accustom to the notifications and it's not a problem for me. I can always change the settings if I want to, say if I'm installing a lot of software, but I have found it's not that really big of a deal. So I leave it all the way up.

    The UAC feature was a big selling point for me in Windows Vista, and I'm glad to see it in Windows 7 as well. "

    WOW someone whos rational and thinks like me and a few others,disabling UAC pointless and more over :

    "The solution is not so simple as you think. What guarantees that malicious software
    cant add itself to this list that you are suggesting to create.? Think again man."

    exactly a virus could be easily developed even by a noobish like me to cincumvent UAC security and set a hidden or even visible exception,not so hard to think in that way....

    "I agree with the idea of an allow list or safe programs list, I just upgraded to Win 7 last week and I have to authorize Acrobat every time I open a PDF!"
    i've seen many embbed/attached executable malicious code in PDF files specially those who come from ur friends via email!

    i would like to quote almost every post here but THAT would be annoying,but here it goes one more :

    "Think that clicking yes every time just lulls me into a false sense of security."
    not in my case,GPO and others like applocker which is part of GPO is there to enforce rules in conjuntion of UAC....

    why dont u disable UAC offline when u want to install a trusted app then move that up again when connected aint that a good solution? i dont recommend tha coz maybe a trusted app may be a hoax...

    Regards,
    RR




    Monday, November 30, 2009 5:48 PM
  • How exactly did you give yourself the admin rights with a cmd prompt? How did you keep the files of your old user acct.? Does doing this allow you to access the folders that have a check mark, and give you access denied when you try to access them? Thanks in advance for your help.
    Monday, November 30, 2009 10:00 PM
  • Tuesday, December 01, 2009 12:09 AM
  • ok update :

    also ppl who s annoyed with UAC pop ups for applications could do the following (not sure of what im talking about so MSFT correct me if im wrong):

    click on the application open it then after its running press alt+ctrl+del pick the start task manager option look for the application executable then right click on it and check UAC virtualization then close the app and try to run again to see if its still prompting,i read a bit about it and thats whats for ,users can run apps without being prompted!
    Kind regards,
    RR
    Tuesday, December 01, 2009 1:01 AM