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Memory Boost in Windows 7 - 32bit v. 64bit

    Question

  • Is there a difference in the amount of memory boost utilization in windows 7 32bit vs. the 64bit version? Does the memory boost stop on 32bit versions once you utilize 4gb of total ram? If you already have 4bg ram can you use memory boost? Will there be a noticeable a difference?

    Edit: I apologize, by memory boost, I meant "ReadyBoost".
    • Edited by misterdan Monday, October 05, 2009 5:12 PM edit
    Sunday, September 20, 2009 3:28 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

     

    As Reckon said, it is caused by Physical Memory space. The link he provided has a detailed instruction.

     

    On any 32-bit Operating System (not only Windows), we only have access to 4GB of physical address space by default. Hardware needs to allocate physical memory space to use for things like the PCI bus, BIOS, the video card and others. It allocates this from the address space presented to it, which is not necessarily the same as the amount of physical RAM installed.

     

    When you have 4GB of RAM installed, the amount of physical memory installed is the same as the address space. If you have 4GB RAM, and the hardware needs to allocate a large chunk of memory for its own use, and it does this from top to bottom, the memory that is blocked off starts at 4GB and allocates downwards. So, the final amount of RAM the OS will be able to see is the difference.

     

    Thursday, September 24, 2009 5:52 AM

All replies

  • Hello misterdan,

    you'll get a lot of opinions about this topic. There are people who will say that 64 bits are worthy for 6 and up Gbs, cause this architecture needs more memory to allocate drivers, etc. Others will keep saying that you'll be able to use the whole memory installed in your machine.

    I think that to make your own decision, the best option is to read the awesome serie of articles written by Master Russinovich in his blog titled "Pushing the Limits of Windows", specifically the one about the Physical Memory.

    Hope this helps.
    If it was helpful, please vote! · · ¡Si te ayudó, por favor vota!
    W7 RTM x64 running along with Office 2010 x64 TP
    Monday, September 21, 2009 9:10 AM
  • Hi,

     

    As Reckon said, it is caused by Physical Memory space. The link he provided has a detailed instruction.

     

    On any 32-bit Operating System (not only Windows), we only have access to 4GB of physical address space by default. Hardware needs to allocate physical memory space to use for things like the PCI bus, BIOS, the video card and others. It allocates this from the address space presented to it, which is not necessarily the same as the amount of physical RAM installed.

     

    When you have 4GB of RAM installed, the amount of physical memory installed is the same as the address space. If you have 4GB RAM, and the hardware needs to allocate a large chunk of memory for its own use, and it does this from top to bottom, the memory that is blocked off starts at 4GB and allocates downwards. So, the final amount of RAM the OS will be able to see is the difference.

     

    Thursday, September 24, 2009 5:52 AM
  • Hi misterdan,

    I think there may be some confusion in this topic.  By "memory boost", are you referring to "ReadyBoost"?  If so, consider having a look at the following:
    Monitoring ReadyBoost on Windows 7
    ReadyBoost

    Since "ReadyBoost is designed to help when your PC's memory is running low.", it comes in handy in cases where the system would start paging.  If the amount of RAM used does not come close to the amount of RAM installed, then it would seem that ReadyBoost would be of little benefit.  This is actually a good situation, as while use of a flash device for swapping is better than a mechanical HD, it is still fastest to keep as much in RAM as possible.
    • Proposed as answer by No.Compromise Monday, October 05, 2009 10:54 AM
    Monday, October 05, 2009 10:54 AM