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Windows 7 Editions Announced

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  • I think I am barely agree with the editions you will release, but at least you should fusionate the Started edition with the Home Basic edition, or the Home Basic with the Home Premium, becouse is very confussing, there's one over.

    And why the started edition has such limitations, I thought the emblem was "Windows vs Walls"

    Please keep listen at us and remove the Home Basic edition, I really understand the others editions and the decision of just focus on two of them is very clever, but Home Basic is just dumb and this make Home Premium more confussing (instead just Home).

    I mean, two editions with extremely limitations... bad idea

    Thursday, February 05, 2009 9:32 AM
  • KISS - Keep it simple stupid. Why go for so many versions? It will just confuse people and its stupid. One version is all you need really, give people the choice of what to install when they install it (with some presets for less tech savvy ppl). This is just windows with lots of walls :/
    Thursday, February 05, 2009 1:23 PM
  • In today's economy different versions might be a good thing if you save a few dollars by not spending money on features you will never use....i.e. netbooks for instance, you can't run premium software on that I wouldn't think. It's confusing until you read about it a little bit, I think it makes sense as long as the savings are substancial enough.
    Thursday, February 05, 2009 3:15 PM
  • Are there any clues as to which version(s) includes Remote Desktop Connection???
    Need it for Windows Home Server.
    • Proposed as answer by Pjunkm Tuesday, May 19, 2009 2:11 AM
    Thursday, February 05, 2009 5:57 PM
  • I think this is a great idea to issue it 2 ways only as home premium and windows 7 pro
    vista basic was a waste.  and i would assume windows 7 pro is in place of xp pro

    the only thing i would like to see is a major discount for those who have vista home premium now and want to upgrade to windows 7 home premium and the same for those who have vista business.  This would give users a bigger incentive to upgrade if the price was right especially in our economy now.

    robin
    Friday, February 06, 2009 12:02 AM
  • I didn't see any 32 bit/64 bit options.... what's up with that ??
    • Proposed as answer by Pjunkm Tuesday, May 19, 2009 2:10 AM
    Friday, February 06, 2009 12:10 AM
  • see this link for more info on SKU's

     http://windowsteamblog.com/blogs/MainFeed.aspx
    Friday, February 06, 2009 4:04 PM
  • :) sounds great to me, lol.
    Never give up on your dreams
    Monday, February 09, 2009 10:21 AM
  • I see they still have Ultimate as well. That suits me. I'm a sucker for the "flashy" stuff ( I bought Vista Ultimate, so there's the proof...)
    just plain crazy...
    • Proposed as answer by clawD27 Saturday, April 04, 2009 10:51 PM
    Monday, February 09, 2009 10:31 AM
  • I also bought Vista Ultimate, so ¿will be any special promo for customers like us?
    Monday, February 09, 2009 2:43 PM
  • Marcos Julian said:

    I also bought Vista Ultimate, so ¿will be any special promo for customers like us?


    Same as there was when you upgraded from XP to Vista :lol:
    Monday, February 09, 2009 3:22 PM

  • So what, exactly, will Ultimate include that Enterprise will not, now that it's been confirmed that Ultimate Extras are dead?  Seems to me that Ultimate is going to simply be Enterprise for those that aren't volume licensing customers.
    Monday, February 09, 2009 5:06 PM
  • When I read that press interview, it is hard to believe that it is coming from one of the most succesful business organisations in the world. It is a complete contradiction of itself. Maybe part of the fault lies with those asking the questions?

    1. Windows 7 Home Premium is the recommended choice for consumers. It gives them a full-function PC experience and a visually rich environment in everything from the way they experience entertainment to the way they connect their devices.

    Windows 7 Professional is the recommended choice for small businesses and for people who work at home but have to operate in an IT-managed or business environment where security and productivity are critical. For those running Windows Vista Business, it will be a very logical move to Windows 7 Professional

    If the first paragraph is correct, why would anyone wish to "move" to Pro? "full-function PC experience and a visually rich environment in everything from the way they experience entertainment to the way they connect their devices"
    What is the Pro addition in Security and productivity?
    I suggest you either drop the Pro altogether, or explain it better. It seems on the wording here, that the only step up will be a grander name!

    2. "Windows 7 Enterprise edition offers advanced data protection, lower cost compliance and IT tools to streamline PC management and help save costs, while enabling access to information from anywhere for business users"
    And doesn't Pro, as previously stated? The lower costs are achieved only through the volume licence, I believe, and not through any special function of the software, as is implied. What is the advanced data protection in this edition? Why is it not in any other planned release?

    3. " we will offer Windows 7 Home Basic, only in emerging markets, for customers looking for an entry-point Windows experience on a full-size value PC"
    What on earth does that mean?? What is an "emerging market", as opposed to a new computer purchaser. How will this differ from:-

    4. "We’ll also continue to offer Windows Starter edition, which will only be offered pre-installed by an OEM. Windows Starter edition will now be available worldwide. This edition is available only in the OEM channel on new PCs limited to specific types of hardware"
    This reply, in conjunction with the previous, is a laugh a minute. This is the same mistake that was made with Vista, and contributed to its bad, and unjust, reputation. It will be pre-installed,  on new computers, by shop salesmen with inadequate knowledge, and, as with Vista, the "out of the box" computer, will have insurmountable compatibility problems. Watch this space for complaints from your average, friendly user!

    5. Again, I cannot quite see the subtle differences between the Pro and Ultimate editions. Leave Enterprise aside, I can see the financial/company need for that method of licencing.
     " there is also a small set of customers who want everything Windows 7 has to offer. So we will continue to have Windows 7 Ultimate edition to meet that specialized need. Windows 7 Ultimate edition is designed for PC enthusiasts who “want it all” "
    Back to my No.1. If security is critical, will they not have Bit locker.etc.? Why?

    Once again this is heading into an incomprehensible choice for the average business or home user. Surely the Home basic, is the natural choice for the preinstalled , retail edition. Home premium would be offered, by the retail trade, as an alternative preinstalled edition, obviously with a cost adjustment, or separate retail purchase. Pro should be dropped altogether and Ultimate would be the natural choice for those who "want it all" As I said previously, Enterprise is in a different category.

    Tuesday, February 10, 2009 6:43 AM
  •  
    dmillergv said:

    Are there any clues as to which version(s) includes Remote Desktop Connection???
    Need it for Windows Home Server.

    Windows 7 Professional and above.
    Hurricane Andrew said:


    So what, exactly, will Ultimate include that Enterprise will not, now that it's been confirmed that Ultimate Extras are dead?  Seems to me that Ultimate is going to simply be Enterprise for those that aren't volume licensing customers.

    That's exactly what Ultimate is now.

    Windows Vista Ultimate was a disaster of epic proportions. Pre-release Ultimate Extras were hyped to be consumer oriented services (music subscriptions and such) that largely enhanced the user experience, free programs and other wonderful things... and these were mostly scrapped. Only the most basic of the Ultimate Extras remained at the end (Texas Hold'em? DreamScenes?) and even then most people consider Ultimate Extras to be promises Microsoft never delivered on as they expected more DreamScenes and SoundScapes, and of better quality.

    In the end their was no clear market for Vista Ultimate except for "people who need all the features" as their is no corrolation among many of the extras, but regular end-users wanted the goodies and were denied. What made it worse was the SKU feature compromise and that Vista Ultimate was price tagged at $599 or so at release.

    1. Windows 7 Home Premium is the recommended choice for consumers. It gives them a full-function PC experience and a visually rich environment in everything from the way they experience entertainment to the way they connect their devices.

    Windows 7 Professional is the recommended choice for small businesses and for people who work at home but have to operate in an IT-managed or business environment where security and productivity are critical. For those running Windows Vista Business, it will be a very logical move to Windows 7 Professional

    If the first paragraph is correct, why would anyone wish to "move" to Pro? "full-function PC experience and a visually rich environment in everything from the way they experience entertainment to the way they connect their devices"
    What is the Pro addition in Security and productivity?
    I suggest you either drop the Pro altogether, or explain it better. It seems on the wording here, that the only step up will be a grander name!

    2. "Windows 7 Enterprise edition offers advanced data protection, lower cost compliance and IT tools to streamline PC management and help save costs, while enabling access to information from anywhere for business users"
    And doesn't Pro, as previously stated? The lower costs are achieved only through the volume licence, I believe, and not through any special function of the software, as is implied. What is the advanced data protection in this edition? Why is it not in any other planned release?

    3. " we will offer Windows 7 Home Basic, only in emerging markets, for customers looking for an entry-point Windows experience on a full-size value PC"
    What on earth does that mean?? What is an "emerging market", as opposed to a new computer purchaser. How will this differ from:-

    4. "We’ll also continue to offer Windows Starter edition, which will only be offered pre-installed by an OEM. Windows Starter edition will now be available worldwide. This edition is available only in the OEM channel on new PCs limited to specific types of hardware"
    This reply, in conjunction with the previous, is a laugh a minute. This is the same mistake that was made with Vista, and contributed to its bad, and unjust, reputation. It will be pre-installed,  on new computers, by shop salesmen with inadequate knowledge, and, as with Vista, the "out of the box" computer, will have insurmountable compatibility problems. Watch this space for complaints from your average, friendly user!

    5. Again, I cannot quite see the subtle differences between the Pro and Ultimate editions. Leave Enterprise aside, I can see the financial/company need for that method of licencing.
     " there is also a small set of customers who want everything Windows 7 has to offer. So we will continue to have Windows 7 Ultimate edition to meet that specialized need. Windows 7 Ultimate edition is designed for PC enthusiasts who “want it all” "
    Back to my No.1. If security is critical, will they not have Bit locker.etc.? Why?

    Once again this is heading into an incomprehensible choice for the average business or home user. Surely the Home basic, is the natural choice for the preinstalled , retail edition. Home premium would be offered, by the retail trade, as an alternative preinstalled edition, obviously with a cost adjustment, or separate retail purchase. Pro should be dropped altogether and Ultimate would be the natural choice for those who "want it all" As I said previously, Enterprise is in a different category.



    1.) Well, "full-functioning" and "feature complete" aren't exactly the same thing. If "small businesses and for people who work at home..." describes you, you're probably a candidate for Windows 7 Professional, if not, stick to Home Premium. The feature-set isn't communicated but the idea is.

    2.) Group Policy controls, AppLocker, BitLocker and BitLocker To Go. While I believe everyone should get BitLocker, especially To Go (who doesn't have a flash drive?), this is how it is.

    3.) Africa, other third-world countries. Home Basic won't be coming to first-world countries.

    4.) I'll agree with you that allowing OEMs to install Windows 7 Starter in first-world countries is asking for a disaster if any of them does. I'm sure many, MANY users will, if given the choice, pick Starter over Home Premium because they're both Windows 7 and there is a price difference they can't see. Thus it'll be the job of the tech-literate to tell these poor souls what they bought and to either return it or *worse* shell out more money for an upgrade.

    5.) Ultimate also has Branch Cache, Direct Access, VHD boot, and Language packs. Why someone has to buy the (likely) $300+ SKU to compute in two languages, I don't know, but again, this is how it is. Personally, I'd like to boot from VHD but I can see why that's not in Home Premium, though it should probably be in Professional.

    Starter has maximum resultion, processor model, and maximum memory limitations, it can't be installed on 99% of near-modern desktops and standard laptops. Home Basic isn't offered in first-world countries, Enterprise isn't available to consumers, and Ultimate is no longer being marketed, especially as "Ultimate." Home Premium and Ultimate are the only choices people are likely to see.

    Edit:
    Cleanup.
    Wednesday, February 11, 2009 8:11 AM
  • Seems to me that maybee 3 editions are all that is necessary: Basic, Premium and Pro/Business. Give all the bells and whistles to Premium (Ultimate) and make Pro/Business a multilicense capable product. Did it not work well for XP? Ifeel that some of Vista's P.R. problems were the multitude of editions
    Friday, February 13, 2009 2:38 AM
  • The real PR problem with Vista was the totally unrealistic 'minimum' specs that were issued.

    I had to work one time on a brand new computer with Home Basic - it had 512 MB of RAM (the 'minimum') - it ran like molasses on a winter's day and took almost 10 full MINUTES before I could even do anything.

    PLEASE - when specs are being issued for W7 - make them realistic

    However, I do agree that there are far too many variants - and why should the Remote Desktop be only on the 'higher' end machines - it's the beginners who NEED that if they are to be helped
    Friday, February 13, 2009 2:50 AM
  • Windows Basic, as it stands, is an abomination of the Windows name and it should never again be mentioned in a first world country. It comes as a surprise to me that Microsoft would replace Basic with the only SKU that could be considered more putrid, Starter. I know it is their answer to low price netbooks but the restrictions put it below the level where first-world users might find it useful. If Home Premium were Ultimate there would be no point in any other single-license SKUs above it, unless it were to be missing features, in which case it's not Ultimate. Speaking of Ultimate, the idea to differentiate single- (Ultimate) and multi-license (Enterprise) high-end SKUs is probably to capture different markets which pay through different methods and scales.

    In the end, you'll only see three options on shelves anyway: Home Premium, Professional, and Ultimate. The latter being de-emphasized, meaning it's unlikely you'll come across it often.

    GI7OMY said:

    The real PR problem with Vista was the totally unrealistic 'minimum' specs that were issued.

    I had to work one time on a brand new computer with Home Basic - it had 512 MB of RAM (the 'minimum') - it ran like molasses on a winter's day and took almost 10 full MINUTES before I could even do anything.

    PLEASE - when specs are being issued for W7 - make them realistic

    However, I do agree that there are far too many variants - and why should the Remote Desktop be only on the 'higher' end machines - it's the beginners who NEED that if they are to be helped


    Some would say the printed Minimum Requirements were too low, GI7OMY. :P More seriously, for end-users that need assistance, someone with Remote Access can remote into their PC using the in-built Remote Assistance.
    Friday, February 13, 2009 5:28 AM
  • Anthony_Mann said:

    Today Microsoft PressPass spoke with Windows General Manager Mike Ybarra who revealed our SKU strategy for Windows 7. Click here to read the details.


    Windows Client IT Pro Audience Manager for Web Forums


    sounds good to me!  like the change from Vista to Win7 - slim and fast.  Too many choices for Vista!  Course I went Ultimate so I'll go Pro.

    Loving Win7 !   Fantastic job!

    Now I'm wondering if 6.2 will serve me espresso in the morning!!!  heehee   or what do they have up their sleeves for 7.0...  more heehee

    Kris -------- Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3P, E7200 2.53@3.8ghz, 2x1gb OCZ Reaper1150@1203, EVGA 9800GTX+ N873 , BFG GS-650, Vista Ult 32 SP1 / Win 7 7000
    Saturday, February 14, 2009 4:54 AM
  • Hi all,

    Like many I am a long term XP user. While my experience of Vista was rather less than a resounding success the good reports on the Windows 7 beta suggested that it would be a significant improvement.

    Having tried the beta there are lots of things I like about Windows 7. It is quicker than vista and the new UI, while taking some time to find my way around, is nice.

    On the down side I run some relatively old hardware (3.2Ghz Athlon/IGB Ram/AGP Graphics card). This means that I can't get the aero interface on my desktop and that my laptop (Intel dual core 1.73GHz, IGB Ram, ATI Radean Xpress200M) is rather sluggish under Windows 7. I believe that a significant number of potential Windows 7 user will be in this kind of position.

    Networking is an issue for me as I store my files on a NAS box rather than my PC or Laptop. With XP networking is reliable and performs well. I did not find this to be the case with Vista and I have had some significant stability issues with networking under Windows 7 resulting in major system crashes. These are so severe that I don't even get a BSOD, just a restart.

    The cost of the upgrade will be a significant issue. If I upgraded I would wish to retain the key functionalities I currently enjoy with XP Pro, especially offline files and network managment. With Vista, for my desktop and laptop, I would have had to spend around GBP400 according to the Microsoft UK store today.

    I would remind the Microsoft decision makers that this amount is similar to the UK weekly take home wage. I would question how appropriate this would be, for what is very much a discretionary purchase, in the current financially diffcult times.

    It is in the balance whether I take up Windows 7 or not. Things that would help sway it for me include:

    - a better experience for users of lower spec hardware, especially with respect to graphics and speed. My experiences with Linxu tell me that this is entriely possible.

    - A better networking experience

    - Windows 7 Pro functionality to be a significant superset of the XP Pro functionality

    - Some kind of upgrade programme which offer great value to existing microsoft supporters with more than one computer.

    I would be really interested to hear some feeback from Microsoft on these thoughts.

    Thanks

    WindyBobMill

    Sunday, February 15, 2009 2:10 AM
  • I don't really understand "stripped versions". OK price point is a reason but some people may buy it then not be happy with the OS
    Tuesday, February 17, 2009 3:26 AM
  • This is me speaking as an individual, not as an MVP, and certainly not with any insight.  Purely my view of what _might_ happen.

    • Starter - on netbooks, etc. in order to avoid providing a PC where the OS costs make Linux more attractive.  Who knows, Microosft might even make it free (again, my guess - not based on any facts) but then if you like it, you pay money to upgrade?
    • Home Basic - for emerging markets. i.e. countries where piracy is rife and money is short.  A limited version is better than nothing affordable.
    • Home Premium - standard version for consumers.
    • Professional - standard version for businesses.
    • Enterprise - volume licensing only - but if any SKU could be dropped, this would be it (IMHO) with the features rolled into Professional and Enterprises could install professional.
    • Ultimate - similar to enterprise, but as a premium version for consumers, with a hefty price tag.
    The thing is about all of this, there has been no pricing announced yet, so we can't really complain until we can put it into context.  As for 32/64 bit, I've seen no announcement yet, but my money would be on Starter and Home Basic being 32-bit only, the rest as 32 or 64.  There's no mention yet of the N or K editions either.

    IMHO, the best thing about all of this is that, unlike with Vista, each SKU builds on the version before, so at least you can see what features you get with each edition, and you don't "lose" functionality as you move up through the versions.

    Finally, there are over a billion Windows users.  A single SKU just wouldn't fit everyone's needs.


    Mark Wilson (MVP Virtual Machine) - http://www.markwilson.co.uk/blog/
    Tuesday, February 17, 2009 5:49 PM
  • mark-wilson said:

    IMHO, the best thing about all of this is that, unlike with Vista, each SKU builds on the version before, so at least you can see what features you get with each edition, and you don't "lose" functionality as you move up through the versions.


    Mark Wilson (MVP Virtual Machine) - http://www.markwilson.co.uk/blog/


    I wholeheartedly agree, Mark.  The biggest Vista annoyance to me was that to use Vista on my home network PC's (which are on a domain) I had to use Business and lose the Media Center features (though I did spring for one OEM Ultimate license).  Not a big deal, but I still always felt cheated out of functionality that users in a lower-priced tier were getting.  I was very happy to see that Windows 7 addresses this shortcoming.
    Tuesday, February 17, 2009 6:42 PM
  • A lot of people seem to forget how many versions XP had. It's not hard to equate them:

    XP Starter => Vista Starter => 7 Starter
    XP Home => Vista Home Basic => 7 Home Basic
    XP Professional => Vista Business => 7 Professional
    XP Media Center Edition => Vista Home Premium => 7 Home Premium

    Only Enterprise and Ultimate are new, and XP never had a version with both Professional and MCE features because of how late MCE came out in the product cycle.


    dmillergv said:

    Are there any clues as to which version(s) includes Remote Desktop Connection???
    Need it for Windows Home Server.

    Same as Vista: Professional, Corporate, and Ultimate have it.


    GI7OMY said:

    The real PR problem with Vista was the totally unrealistic 'minimum' specs that were issued.

    I had to work one time on a brand new computer with Home Basic - it had 512 MB of RAM (the 'minimum') - it ran like molasses on a winter's day and took almost 10 full MINUTES before I could even do anything.

    PLEASE - when specs are being issued for W7 - make them realistic

    Minimum requirements for Windows 7 are on par with or lower than Vista so far (The only version of Windows with lower reqs than the version before it, I think).


    GI7OMY said:

    However, I do agree that there are far too many variants - and why should the Remote Desktop be only on the 'higher' end machines - it's the beginners who NEED that if they are to be helped

    Remote Assistance is for beginners who need to be helped - it's basically the same thing, except it requires the user to be there to accept the offer of assistance, etc, etc. Remote Desktop is more for remote administration, which is why it's considered a business feature.
    Friday, February 20, 2009 1:30 PM
  •  All these reasons and discussions are why xp pro is going to live on in infamy.....Or until Microsoft comes back to earth with their prices and os for wanting to be the best OS out there and not the richest they dont seem to get that they are the easiest to learn not necessarily the best. I already have ordered more xp pro disks to have for a while or untill something changes.
    Saturday, February 21, 2009 12:30 AM
  • Actually, I'm really most concerned about Windows 7 starter - I'm really not sure how this is going to be a good thing for netbooks.  From everything I've read so far, this is going to be the version that lets you use a maximum of three programs at once, and if it's anything like XP Starter, it won't let you connect to a home network.  What's the advantage in that, then?

    Also, according to windowsteamblog.com (Microsoft's Windows 7 blog), "the bits for all the editions are already on your computer if you are running Windows 7."  Wait - this means that they're loading ALL the possible Windows 7 features onto my hard drive, waiting for me to install them?  Won't that take up a lot of unnecessary space on my hard drive?  (or am I reading this all wrong?)

    I know that my humble opinion won't really go anywhere or do anything - what's a single guy compared to Microsoft?

    Seriously - I don't think there's any reason to have anything beyond ONE single SKU for Windows 7 - and it should come with the full features of Ultimate available.  From there, one would be able to customize the installations to match up with the various versions.  When you install Windows, it would ask you what you're planning to use your computer for, then it would select one of the six versions.  They would *all* be available - no need to pay anything to upgrade.  Or - you could customize your Windows build and pick which components you'd like to include or exclude.

    At this pont, at the very least, you won't get people confused over which version to buy.  And you won't get people like me annoyed that they have to pay a WAY higher fee for a single feature they wish they had in Home Edition, e.g. Remote Desktop.

    Remember folks, there's only ONE version of Mac's operating system.  They're successful because they're keeping it simple.  Microsoft, won't you please do the same?  Keep it simple and keep it affordable.
    Saturday, February 21, 2009 5:57 AM
  •  
    X-Kal said:

    Actually, I'm really most concerned about Windows 7 starter - I'm really not sure how this is going to be a good thing for netbooks.  From everything I've read so far, this is going to be the version that lets you use a maximum of three programs at once, and if it's anything like XP Starter, it won't let you connect to a home network.  What's the advantage in that, then?

    Also, according to windowsteamblog.com (Microsoft's Windows 7 blog), "the bits for all the editions are already on your computer if you are running Windows 7."  Wait - this means that they're loading ALL the possible Windows 7 features onto my hard drive, waiting for me to install them?  Won't that take up a lot of unnecessary space on my hard drive?  (or am I reading this all wrong?)

    I know that my humble opinion won't really go anywhere or do anything - what's a single guy compared to Microsoft?

    Seriously - I don't think there's any reason to have anything beyond ONE single SKU for Windows 7 - and it should come with the full features of Ultimate available.  From there, one would be able to customize the installations to match up with the various versions.  When you install Windows, it would ask you what you're planning to use your computer for, then it would select one of the six versions.  They would *all* be available - no need to pay anything to upgrade.  Or - you could customize your Windows build and pick which components you'd like to include or exclude.

    At this pont, at the very least, you won't get people confused over which version to buy.  And you won't get people like me annoyed that they have to pay a WAY higher fee for a single feature they wish they had in Home Edition, e.g. Remote Desktop.

    Remember folks, there's only ONE version of Mac's operating system.  They're successful because they're keeping it simple.  Microsoft, won't you please do the same?  Keep it simple and keep it affordable.

    Windows 7 Starter can join, but not create, a Home Network. Because of some of the restrictions on Starter, OEMs can only sell Starter on bare-minimum low-end machines. That said, there are going to be headaches for many people getting Windows 7 Starter based netbooks in first world countries. Hardware upgrades, specifically things like memory, where it's capped, will be even more confusing for end users. Imagine being told that on top of the $29.99 you paid for your 2GB memory stick you have to pay $79.99* for a boxed upgrade to Home Premium or $239.99* for a retail box. This probably won't be the only issue, can you connect to and properly use an external monitor with a resolution greater than 1024x768? Probably not. And unless there is a scary looking prompt I'm sure most non-technical people will even know Anytime Upgrades, whatever they cost, are an option.

    A single SKU would likely be a financial hit for Microsoft. An affordable single SKU moreso.

    * Based off Vista Home Basic > Home Premium upgrade.
    ** Pulled from Vista Home Premium price. As I was putting down prices I realized the removal of Basic meant Home Premium might move down in price. Basic is a lot more expensive than I remembered though, $199.99 for a retail license.
    Saturday, February 21, 2009 8:23 AM
  • It would be nice if Microsoft would have cheaper retail editions instead of twice as much as a oem it would be nice if it was maybe half that because retail editions are too expensive. Because I like a product that I can keep forever, not just being stuck when my computer dies or explodes :P. I hope kind of hope they will just make sure the home premium is put into netbooks, because this operating system is going to be released in 2010 or 2011. because most integrated cards especially the Nvidia 9400 ion should be able to run aero and thats coming out this year so I think its crucial to have home premium for networking and aero or  a windows 7 highly optimized starter or basic edition for umpcs because speed and battery life is very important too most of us with netbooks.
    Saturday, February 21, 2009 4:58 PM
  • Fewer SKUs and a lower price will also mean a wider adoption rate.  Would I ever dream of spending over $200 on any version of Windows?  Not a chance!  How about getting Apple's operating system for roughly $100-140?  Lowering prices on the full version - and keeping it simple by only selling the full version - will increase adoption rate.  Crippling the version to something like Windows 7 Starter and lowering the price on said crippled version will not.
    Sunday, February 22, 2009 2:45 PM
  • Any information, any at all on whether or not we get a significant discount when switching from Vista?

    Vista has been an absolute waste of money, in truth they should have skipped Vista and jumped to 7.
    They have got to give a pretty damn good discount for switching from Vista to 7.
    Wednesday, February 25, 2009 8:32 PM
  • rp002 said:

     All these reasons and discussions are why xp pro is going to live on in infamy.....Or until Microsoft comes back to earth with their prices and os for wanting to be the best OS out there and not the richest they dont seem to get that they are the easiest to learn not necessarily the best. I already have ordered more xp pro disks to have for a while or untill something changes.


    Same here. When my girl got her new laptop she was so frustrated after only one month we immediately "downgraded" it back to XP Pro and never once looked back.

    XP is still the best os Microsoft ever made in my opinion....until next year that is.

    Windows 7 will finally allow XP to take it's bow and exit the stage with grace. But it'll live on for as long I can make it go in my gaming rig.




    texan4u
    Thursday, February 26, 2009 6:52 PM
  • as long as Microsoft keep control on how the numerous versions of Windows 7 are made available that is fine by me as it will allow Microsoft to make a bit more money by pc buyers upgrading from the basic supplied version to the retail version, as we all know Microsoft need the money lol.

     

    But if Microsoft release too many versions to the public it could be a disaster. 

    Two's company three's confusion, 4, 5,6 arghhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

    Friday, February 27, 2009 7:42 PM
  • Upgrade SKUs sell for about 50% the price of their retail counterparts. Available for those that use Vista and XP. Hows that? ;-)
    Friday, February 27, 2009 9:02 PM
  • think further, windows versions need to be reduced, in the war of pc manufactures wanting to out sell the opposition it wont be long before the starter version gets replaced with a pre installed ultimate.

    My point here is that, and a lot will say this is stupid, but people will replace the computer because it works out easier/cheeper than upgrading the software.

    Who would have ever thought that when your printer runs out of tonner it is sometimes cheeper to replace the printer.

    Saturday, February 28, 2009 9:00 AM
  •  
    X-Kal said:

    Also, according to windowsteamblog.com (Microsoft's Windows 7 blog), "the bits for all the editions are already on your computer if you are running Windows 7."  Wait - this means that they're loading ALL the possible Windows 7 features onto my hard drive, waiting for me to install them?  Won't that take up a lot of unnecessary space on my hard drive?  (or am I reading this all wrong?)


    I'll be willing to bet that everything will be in the install DVD, and your product activation code will determine what features of Windows 7 will be installed.  I have no idea if this will be the case, but it's just my guess.

    Saturday, February 28, 2009 11:35 PM
  • That's how Vista works already - the DVD has all versions on it - which version gets installed on your computer depends on the key you enter
    Sunday, March 01, 2009 12:22 AM
  • Is there a nice spreadsheet type report somewhere showing the numerous versions of Windows 7 across the top and the features down on the left side and then there's an "X" indicating which Windows version has which feature?  It would be nice to see what one version offers over another, rather than trying to decipher a few things mentioned in a paragraph somewhere.

    And personally, I think they should combine Starter with Basic and combine Enterprise with Ultimate.  Just like Vista, I feel there's too many versions being offered.
    Wednesday, March 04, 2009 4:20 PM
  •  http://www.dailytech.com/Updated+Windows+7+Editions+Compared+With+Table+of+Features/article14198.htm

    Windows 7 Enterprise is just Ultimate with volume licensing, they're, for all intents and purposes, the same SKU. They just want to differentiate the method of distrobution for different markets.
    Wednesday, March 04, 2009 7:11 PM
  • Home Premium needs to have remote desktop host, considering how many people will want to have access to their applications on the go.  It's not just a business feature - this is something we all should be able to get - without having to pay for the Professional edition.
    Friday, March 06, 2009 1:48 AM
  • the issue is that we all do different things with our computers, networks and servers. We all want communication IE one language between them all. So many OSs so little compatibility. Fusination is the word I remember out of it all. And the image in my mind is of children in a candy store. Two of those,one of those... no, wait three of those red ones and a sherbert!
    Perhaps they can dissect it into packages like laptop, terminal server and powerhouse. It cannot be that people believe that less features equals a wall. less features= smaller footprint. The versions relate to the typical computer systems; what mum buys for the kid's education, what a small business needs, a large business, gamers and science labs. We buy the computer system suited to the software we want to run.  The operating system is determined by the needs of the hardware. It is almost the last thought on our minds when we chose the machines. Having chosen or built the computer system of our dreams we look to operating systems to do the rest. If it is built in we wear it grumbling or not. But most keen computereters use more than one OS to cover the range of available softwares and features anyway. It is a multitude, a mass (dare I say even, a mess) a tower of babel. We can work it out or make it worse.
    Monday, March 16, 2009 4:30 PM
  • All versions should have robust back-up restore features that are in the 7 Beta today, including the disk imaging. A Disaster Recovery mechanism should not be restricted to the higher end versions only.

    As far a Remote Desktop, I agree that it should be part of the Home Premium package. I am a Vista Home Premium user (3 PCs) and use a program call LogMeIn (free to consumers) to connect to another of my home PCs for troubleshooting, but would prefer the Remote Desktop option.
    Windows 7 beta dual booting with VISTA Home Premium 2 GB memory 160 HD Gateway Laptop HP Officejet 6310 All-in One inkjet printer Verizon FIOS Internet Connection
    Friday, April 10, 2009 8:33 PM
  • 4 things:-
    ¬ REDUCE piracy.
    ¬ PROMOTE legitimate adoption rates for users from previous versions.
    ¬ MAINTAIN and improve on market share.
    ¬ FAIR pricings as an acceptable level for cost of entry.

    At least that's what I thought as the 4 most important priorities when you're out to pitch Windows.But the fact is:-
    Multiple SKUs' licensing = FAIL/runs directly opposite to the priorities.

    Some people are dumb maybe, also that some would just want to get things done when they boot up get the desktop to appear.Why do you think there's still people paying for overpriced Macs?They're willing to not give a hoot about the advertised  and preset hardware prices because they won't have to deal with Mac OS X "Oooops can only run spreadsheets" + Mac OS X Stay at Home Only + Mac OS X Now You're A Real Man Edition But You Still Only Get $20 Off Additional Licenses crapola.You know it,the majority of us too and some still in denial...

    Directing resources to still deal with separate x86/32 and 64 bits are already tedious but on multiple SKUs?There are dedicated and thoroughly coordinated groups out there just relishing and giggling at the idea of putting out so-called "optimized" or "clutter-free" Ultimate editions for free, face that fact.And why?We already know why.Because...
    1) They can..not because they have to.
    2) They add inches to their e-peens looking at total downloaded figures per release.
    3) Younger kids does not care about legitimate IP rights.They just want things for free or cheap.Operative term being CHEAP.They don't want to get a computer and risk seeing the sticker price to add the OS (wait what?which one?which one PWNZ? they'll ask) when they already know you can't do anything with a computer sans the OS.

    From early XP days until now,it shouldn't take me this much text to let you guys know what you should already have.
    Monday, April 13, 2009 5:23 PM
  • hi  i was wondering  i have a key   my drive that i had the iso died were can i get a new copy plz  help
    Monday, April 13, 2009 10:10 PM
  • Bummer... At the moment, unless you've got a friend who's got a copy of the ISO, and can burn it to DVD for you, or have access to TechNet Plus - you're pretty much out of luck until the Release Canddiate is released. Signs are pointing to the RC being close to being ready for release.
    Monday, April 13, 2009 10:20 PM
  • i thought there was only going to be two flavors, Home premium for the home user and windows 7 pro for the advanced/business user.  How come Microsoft changed its mind?.  this first way really seemed a lot easier for both the consumer and the business user.

    robin
    Monday, April 13, 2009 10:36 PM
  • Robinb9 -

    Um.. Nope.. The plan is, however, that the vast majority of consumers in the US are only going to see Home Premium and Professional. Enterprise users will still get their Corporate and those who just HAVE to have it all can buy an upgrade key to Ultimate Edition. Those outside the US may find Starter and Home Basic editions.

    This has been known since the begining of this thread way back in Feb...

    Tuesday, April 14, 2009 12:10 AM
  • @ The Calm Critic -

    I'm thinking you're not quite getting the purpose of the multiple SKU thing. But that's ok, a lot of people tend to be baffled by it. Why would someone who is only going to be maybe doing some light surfing on the web from home, checking and answering some email, and maybe typing out a basic letter or two, have a need for say, Windows Ultimate, BitLocker, Windows Media Center, and all the other stuff when Home Basic would be more than enough for their needs? Why should they pay top dollar for all those bells and whistles if they don't have to?

    There will always be software pirates. You can do your best to stop them and such, and to a degree, you may even succeed. But there will always be a fringe element that will be drawn to the challenge of overcoming and bypassing those locks. Making it cheap won't stop them. Beyond those who seek to bypass the antipiracy measures, there will also be those people who will seek out their ____ and make illicit uses of them.


    Tuesday, April 14, 2009 12:28 AM
  • Well, I question why it is that the Ultimate edition really needs such a high price tag?  I know there are legitimate arguments to be made on both sides of the camp, however.  Here's my attitude, though: I shouldn't have to worry about which version of Windows 7 I'll want to get that meets my specific needs.  Let's say that Home Premium has most of the features I want, but I need one more from Professional, but I'll need to get Ultimate to get the whole set.  Or, I've got two computers, one with a 32-bit Via processor and the other with an AMD Turion 64.  Must I buy two separate copies of Windows 7 when my retail copy would normally let me install it to three computers?  Can't I just pick up one box that does it all?

    My final point is pretty brief.  Simplify it with one SKU (that includes both 32- and 64-bit support), and give it a MUCH lower price tag.  Lower prices lead to lower piracy rates and higher adoption rates.  It's a scary thing to lower prices when there's a bottom line at hand, but I'm very convinced that this kind of strategy will work.

    P.S: In terms of the upgrade versions.... I always hesitate to buy those.  Why?  What happens if I lose my XP or Vista installation CD?  Unless things have changed recently, upgrade copies usually require at least a CD key from the previous version.  (Please correct me if I'm wrong)
    Tuesday, April 14, 2009 2:30 AM
  • @ X-Cal -

    That WAS true of Vista... But they're doing things a bit differently with Windows 7. Each Windows 7 edition contains the full feature set of the version below it. Sort of like a set of Russian Matryoshku (nesting) dolls. So if we use your example, If Home Premium will do almost everything except for say, one thing found in Professional - then all you need to do is buy the Pro version. You no longer need to go above and beyond and buy Ultimate. This is why Ultimate is not even going to be an SKU most people will even see unless you're one of those people who just HAS to have the whole enchilada.

    With Vista, if you bought Ultimate, you got the option of buying extra licenses of Home Premium at a discount price. Since pricing for Windows 7 and packages and other deals have NOT yet been set, let alone made known, speculation about it is kind of pointless at the moment.

    Given the state of the economy, I'm fairly certain that Microsoft will no doubt take the status of people's wallets and willingness to part with cash into account and will price Windows 7 accordingly.

    Actually... There's a technique for installing Vista (and Windows 7) as an upgrade without having a prior version. In fact, the Windows Vista and 7 installer doesn't even have a means for checking out a prior version - tho, I do believe the Win 7 version will detect XP and tell you that you've got to do a clean install. Google for it.

    Tuesday, April 14, 2009 5:29 AM
  • KISS - Keep it simple stupid. Why go for so many versions? It will just confuse people and its stupid. One version is all you need really, give people the choice of what to install when they install it (with some presets for less tech savvy ppl). This is just windows with lots of walls :/

    Just my words !
    Someone has mixed words 'PROFESSIONALITY" and "ENTERTAINMENT" like "WORK" and "PLAY".
    Does this mean that people in MS don't work, but just view videos and listen music. If so, I would recommend them to wisit some real company or university, where people try to make real work with these multimedia-video-game-Windowses.

    In laboratories and offices we want a version with NO multimedia but with domain connectivity.
    - No multimedia, no Aero. Just extreme durability and simplicity.
    - Having window after window doesn't make thing simple. Now every small change in configuration is made through a jungle of obsolete windowses. Many things are easier on terminal screen. Or even on one screen with all parameters collected.

    In home we need three (four) types of computers: desktop tool, multimedia/game highend goameboards, file server, (laptops)
    The rumoured delivery system is like tower of Hanoi: you pay more you get more (and mostly things you don't need or want). The right model might be parallel existence.

    It is rumoured that the REAL BUSSINESS VERION is named 'Windows 7 Home Basic' and sold only in developing countries in Africa, South America and Asia. Not in Europe or USA.

    Microsoft should take a look in eeeBuntu Base, which is delivered with only minimum tools and toys. All that is needed can be downloaded from the net.
    Wednesday, April 15, 2009 9:05 AM
  • Ok Mistofeles, calm down. I am sure the bosses know that the real world turns off aero and plugs along with tried and true technology. Why, I hear many workplaces use no windowses at all. The Entrofessinaltianiability of your ideas is fathomless. I have the full mental picture of a jungle of obsolete windowses and the need to find the one that leads to parrallel existence and the ideal OS.


    You also said, and I quote "It is rumoured that the REAL BUSSINESS VERION is named 'Windows 7 Home Basic' and sold only those underdeveloped chimpansees  in developing countries in Africa, South America and Asia."

    Hold up just a sec. We are not chimpanzees. We are not backward, we are no less able than you! Careful examination of the demands throughout the world would show demand varies from place to place. Need varies, and spelling varies.....Your problem is You need the business version. And noone can find it without invention of better search engine. (ps Get out there and find that perfect operating system and bring it back and see what the critics say.
    Wednesday, April 15, 2009 10:37 AM
  • i thought there was only going to be two flavors, Home premium for the home user and windows 7 pro for the advanced/business user.  How come Microsoft changed its mind?.  this first way really seemed a lot easier for both the consumer and the business user.

    robin

    Hands up all you bussiness users who really need AERO or multimedia in your work !

    The word 'professional' seems to mean nowadays children. At least, when you read the advertisements.
    Same goes with word 'bussiness' in Microsoft vocabulary.

    THere should be a minimum version without any eyecandy, games and ding-dong for all of us, who try to make real work.
    Thursday, April 16, 2009 8:02 AM
  • Mistofeles -

    Geeze dude... Lighten up and quick being such a... retentive type... I personally DO need multimedia. The Aero is eye candy. But by no means is it something that should be avoided. Nor is it evil. Nor does it HAVE to get in your way. In fact, if you bother to actually learn to use the Aero features properly, they might <gasp!> increase productivity!

    But I think you're seriously missing the point. If your workers are given something that makes their day a bit more pleasant - without robbing them of their productivity or robbing you of your bank account when buying systems, then DOES IT REALLY MATTER if those features are there?

    The answer is not really. There will always be slacker types who need constant supervision - or they'd be off doing things other than what they should be doing. You'll still need to crack a whip on people like that to keep them focused. And that would be regardless of the OS or it's features.

    But I think most people who work for a living understand that they have to do some actual work in order to keep that pay check coming... Especially in the current day and age. No one wants to be unemployed without a prospect for future income.

    Fortunately, Windows can be customized to your heart's content. You don't want something - either don't install it, or turn it off. It's not that complicated.

    And if that's still not enough - get Home Basic.
    Thursday, April 16, 2009 10:27 AM
  • mistofeles,

    Your comment and characterization of people from other countries is completely inappropriate and offensive. I have edited your post to remove the offensive part, but to keep the revelant part.

    These forums are open to all community members from all nationalities in order to foster a healthy discussion. Your post was in direct contrast to that and violates the posted Code of Conduct. Therefore, I am putting you on notice that another offense of this nature will result in you being banned from all TechNet, MSDN, Answers, and Expression forums.

    Thank you.

    -Tony Mann


    Windows Client IT Pro Audience Manager for Web Forums
    Friday, April 17, 2009 3:07 PM
  • In response to the comment above this one:

    Why should anyone get a "major discount" for purchasing a new product?!  If you purchase the upgrade vs. the full version, you are already getting a "discount".  I can't believe that people think that they deserve a discount because they jumped feet first into a product they did not research.  I waited, tested, and read the reviews before I decided I did not want to upgrade to Vista.  I do not expect Microsoft to give anything more than what I paid for, especially a discount.  That idea just makes me laugh!
    Thursday, April 23, 2009 1:36 AM
  • ...why should the Remote Desktop be only on the 'higher' end machines - it's the beginners who NEED that if they are to be helped
    This is an incredibly valid point. 
    Sunday, April 26, 2009 2:25 AM
  • ...why should the Remote Desktop be only on the 'higher' end machines - it's the beginners who NEED that if they are to be helped
    This is an incredibly valid point. 

    It sounds like you are referring to Remote Assistance, not Remote Desktop. Remote Assistance is the feature that beginners use when they need help. Remote Desktop is a management feature for remotely logging into other computers.
    Windows Client IT Pro Audience Manager for Web Forums
    Sunday, April 26, 2009 4:43 PM
  • You should just leave it as simple and clear it can be.
    Having 345435435435 versions that get little differences with each other will only lead to many problems for IT professionals and consumers.
    And why not even scrap the whole versioning plan and release only one solid version, making it's price moderate compared with whatsoever plan you got in your heads.

    There is enough messing with the pros/cons of each version, but I believe having one solid solution in a more affordable price is better. Don't fall to the same trap...
    Sunday, May 03, 2009 11:52 AM
  • NasosD -

    I don't know where you're coming up with "345435435435" versions. Most consumers when they walk into Best Buy will only see one - Home Premium. Most business' will either see Professional or Enterprise/Ultimate. I'm not so sure anyone will be seeing Starter or Home Basic in Europe or North America - not even on netbooks. Ultimate will only be for those truly diehard guys who just have to have everything.

    Most home users aren't likely to have a burning need for advanced networking - i.e. logging into their personal home Active Directory box. Some, like myself, do. Of course, I do have a home business - so I'm likely to get a copy of Professional when the time is right.

    Microsoft got smart with the way they're lining up the various versions - each higher version includes EVERYTHING the next lower version has. It's sort of like a set of those Russian Nesting Dolls - each smaller doll fits neatly into the next bigger one.

    I say why pay for features I don't need. I get the version that does everything I need and I'm off and running. Yes, it takes a bit of effort to research your personal needs. And sales people need to be trained to help people out. It's not THAT big a deal.

    Sunday, May 03, 2009 12:18 PM
  • NasosD -

    I don't know where you're coming up with "345435435435" versions. Most consumers when they walk into Best Buy will only see one - Home Premium. Most business' will either see Professional or Enterprise/Ultimate. I'm not so sure anyone will be seeing Starter or Home Basic in Europe or North America - not even on netbooks. Ultimate will only be for those truly diehard guys who just have to have everything.

    Most home users aren't likely to have a burning need for advanced networking - i.e. logging into their personal home Active Directory box. Some, like myself, do. Of course, I do have a home business - so I'm likely to get a copy of Professional when the time is right.

    Microsoft got smart with the way they're lining up the various versions - each higher version includes EVERYTHING the next lower version has. It's sort of like a set of those Russian Nesting Dolls - each smaller doll fits neatly into the next bigger one.

    I say why pay for features I don't need. I get the version that does everything I need and I'm off and running. Yes, it takes a bit of effort to research your personal needs. And sales people need to be trained to help people out. It's not THAT big a deal.

    Funny(?) story, years ago I called microsoft to ask about some cute feature in win 95, and was told it was only available in the upgrade version.
       fast forward a few years to people telling me that certain versions of Microsoft software become completely unuseable after a certain number of (serial) installations eg, 10 installations and you're SOL.
       The self-perpetuated myth that you might have to call Microsoft a little less if you buy the full pig-with-ribbon is so far just that, a myth, and yes, you're looking  a total tool who bought vista-ultimate for just that reason.
       Please forgive us that do not know the EULA secrets prior to purchasing. One day in a better universe someone will pay gobs to have a version with "everything" including a key that never expires. Like Win 98.
    Sunday, May 03, 2009 1:06 PM
  • ...why should the Remote Desktop be only on the 'higher' end machines - it's the beginners who NEED that if they are to be helped
    This is an incredibly valid point. 

    It sounds like you are referring to Remote Assistance, not Remote Desktop. Remote Assistance is the feature that beginners use when they need help. Remote Desktop is a management feature for remotely logging into other computers.
    Windows Client IT Pro Audience Manager for Web Forums

    Maybe there is confusion between the two, but I would like to see Remote Desktop in the Home Premium edition. I use Logmein to log into other computers on my home network for troubleshooting because I do not have the Vista Ultimate edition. I find this to be a valuable tool and it should be included in the Home Premium, as should backup imaging...etc.

    Windows 7 beta dual booting with VISTA Home Premium 2 GB memory 160 HD Gateway Laptop HP Officejet 6310 All-in One inkjet printer Verizon FIOS Internet Connection
    Sunday, May 03, 2009 3:41 PM
  • Yeah, there should be only one menu item at McDonalds too.    After all, one size DOES fit all, right?  

    Everyone conveniently forgets that there are FOUR versions of XP also.   So much hand wringing over a non issue.  

    95% of you will get Home Premium, the rest will spring for Ultimate.   So you have 2 choices.   Businesses have 2 choices - Pro or Enterprise.   What is "so confusing" about that?

    I have Vista Ultimate and now 7 Ultimate, both 64.    Easy choice there, as I have an MSDN subscription.
    Tuesday, May 05, 2009 10:40 AM
  • Stop with the hundred different versions! I hope all versions have remote desktop unlike xp home - all versions should be able to network to a server. I suggest a Home, Business and Enterprise options. Are all versions going to be 64bit?
    Sunday, May 10, 2009 5:16 AM
  • Most home users are not savvy enough to setup and maintain one OS, let alone create XP VMs and run software inside of THAT.   It just isn't going to happen.

    Home Premium is for HOME use.   People who want to manage their pictures and MP3s and videos and maybe run Office and play some games.   That covers a LOT of people.   Maybe not 95% but surely 75%.   These folks have no idea what a GP is, nor do they need to connect to a Domain. 

    If you need this stuff, then you know you need it and can get Professional or Ultimate.    Lumping everything into one version means the 75%  are paying for features they will never use.   Is that fair?

    Again, everyone forgets that there are FOUR vesions of XP.   No one seemed confused at that.

    Get Home Premium for the normal family PC.   If you are a geek and you are running a Domain at home and you need to run VMs for work or whatever, then get Professional.    If you want everything then just get Ultimate.

    Seriously, there are more options to choose from at McDonalds.   Everyone seems to manage that OK.   Why all the hand wringing over 2 or 3 choices for software?    Handle it like you are buying a new flat screen TV.   Do your research first, then go buy.

    This is not difficult, folks.
    Sunday, May 10, 2009 3:31 PM
  • Then what are you complaining about?   Once you know the facts, you buy the one that meets your needs, right?

    Do you hang out on Samsung web sites, complaining about why are there so many TV choices?    So many sizes, LCD or Plasma?   5.1 Stereo?   7.1 Stereo?   5000 to 1 contrast?   20000 to 1?   120 Hz refresh?    What resolution?   HD?   Blu ray capable?   

    Choosing a Microsoft OS is positively easy compared to all of that.
    • Edited by Naddy69 Sunday, May 10, 2009 4:34 PM
    Sunday, May 10, 2009 4:29 PM
  • Things are different now than 10 years ago.    There are more versions of Windows because there are more users, and more levels of user sophistication.    Does my 10 year old daughter's laptop need to run VMs, connect to a Domain and configure Group Policies?   No, she just wants to do her homework, chat with her friends and play games.   Home Premium is plenty for her, Home Basic would probably be OK.  

    OTOH, I want everything on MY machines, so it's Ultimate for me.   I need VMs because I work from home, I need to connect to the work Domain network, etc.   I need all the tools I can get.

    One size NEVER fits all.    Different size TVs, different size burgers at McDonalds, different size software.

    It's funny how the Linux crowd continues to crow about how all the (dozens?  hundreds?) of different Linux versions is a Good Thing.   But 3 versions of Windows Vista/7 is too much?   Remember, there were 4 versions of XP!
    Sunday, May 10, 2009 6:49 PM
  • The one and only feature I have found useful in Ultimate.. that really should be available in Home Premium.. is Windows Fax and Scan.  A simple tool that shouldn't cost a typical consumer the extra $100 - $200 to use just to upgrade from Home to say Pro or Ultimate.

    Sunday, May 10, 2009 11:50 PM
  • YA SO NOW WE HAVE RC1 AND THOUGHTS ON OFFICIAL RTM DATE AND DIFERANT VERSIONS. BUT NO ONE HAS (1)TALKED PRICE
    (2) TALKED ABOUT PEOPLE THAT BOUGH NEW SYSTEMS AND GOT STUCK WITH VISTA FOR 2+ YEARS WITH CONSTANT PROBLEMS, AND CONSTANT UPDATING. PEOPLE THAT STUCK IT OUT WITH VISTA SHOULD GET SOME SORT OF DISCOUNT OR SOMETHING.
    SO HURRY UP AND GET IT OUT THERE SO I CAN BUY IT AND ____ SOME MORE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Monday, May 11, 2009 7:19 PM
  • The fact is there are 3 versions of Windows 7 for consumers.  Why this seems so confusing to you is beyond comprehension.   There are way more than 3 cars you can buy.  There are way more than 3 TVs you can buy.  There are way more than 3 computers you can buy.   But 3 choices of software is too much for you to process.  You appear to be just trolling.
    Wednesday, May 13, 2009 8:55 PM
  • I hope they stick with the versions "Windows 7 Home Premium" && "Windows 7 Professional"  makes it easier to understand that having versions like Vista!
    Thursday, May 14, 2009 9:52 AM
  • I hope they stick with the versions "Windows 7 Home Premium" && "Windows 7 Professional"  makes it easier to understand that having versions like Vista!

    Andrew -

    For the most part - that IS the general plan - Home Premium and Professional. Ultimate, from what I've read won't even show up at your local retailers as an option. You'd have to buy Premium or Pro and do an Anytime Upgrade and buy the license key on line.

    Only OEMs will get access to Starter and Home Basic - and those won't be sold anywhere except in developing areas.
    Thursday, May 14, 2009 10:15 AM
  • I hope they stick with the versions "Windows 7 Home Premium" && "Windows 7 Professional"  makes it easier to understand that having versions like Vista!

    Andrew -

    For the most part - that IS the general plan - Home Premium and Professional. Ultimate, from what I've read won't even show up at your local retailers as an option. You'd have to buy Premium or Pro and do an Anytime Upgrade and buy the license key on line.

    Only OEMs will get access to Starter and Home Basic - and those won't be sold anywhere except in developing areas.

    Brilliant, I think they still should have stuck with the two editions though.  Maximizing profit I guess.
    Thursday, May 14, 2009 10:24 AM
  • The fact is there are 3 versions of Windows 7 for consumers.  Why this seems so confusing to you is beyond comprehension.   There are way more than 3 cars you can buy.  There are way more than 3 TVs you can buy.  There are way more than 3 computers you can buy.   But 3 choices of software is too much for you to process.  You appear to be just trolling.

    This just doesn't make any sense to me.

    There have always been lots of cars to choose from, and always been lots of TVs to buy.

    They were around a long time before the first Windows software appeared, in one version only...

    These new multi-versions just don't make any sense at all...

    There are 10 kinds of people in this world - those who know binary and those who don't...
    Friday, May 15, 2009 4:44 AM
  • So many versions will make the normal user go confused on which Edition to buy .As far as i feel there should have been only 4 Version max one Home , Professional, Ultimate and one Business Edition for Offices and stuff.The price reduction would boost the sales or once the Windows 7 launch a discounted price would make more people buy thus stopping Piracy...Just my views..
    Friday, May 15, 2009 9:47 AM
  • Just make it simple
    Advance  : For Business .+ Add microsoft  office license(Seems like monopoly if so.but for business.I just want to run and used this pc/laptop without thinking licensing issue)+ IIS 8(if appicable).
    Medium   : For normal people
    Basic       : Starter Pack(No office)(no iis server)(no media player[Europe anti trust])(no internet explorer)

     
    php programmer
    Monday, May 18, 2009 4:15 AM
  • I have mixed feelings about the multiple editions. On the one hand, it's a drag that I have to pay extra for Bitlocker when it is already written. There is zero cost to Microsoft for me to be able to use it.

    On the other hand, one of the common complaints about operating systems is that they are often bloated with functionality that most people never use. While it does not cost Microsoft (or any other OS supplier) anything to include these extra capabilities once they have written them in the first place, they can make the system difficult to use for regular users.

    Also, by charging different amounts, it is possible that I am being charged less for Home Edition than I would be charged for Only Edition since some people are willing to buy the more expensive Professional Edition.

    However, what I would like is a single version based upon your PCs capabilities (thus they could sell a cut down version in India without Americans flooding NewEgg.IN with orders) but with all the functionality that will reasonably run on your PC. There would be some sort of Wizard that could be run whenever wished that would guide the user through setting up the features so that things like Bitlocker would not be shown regularly if it were not implemented on this PC. Thus, you have the ability to use the full functionality without having 300 options that are never used obscuring the 10 options that are.


    Built my own i7-920, Asus P6T, 6GB, 1TB Caviar Black, 4870 with 1GB.
    Monday, May 18, 2009 7:10 PM
  • KISS - Keep it simple stupid. Why go for so many versions? It will just confuse people and its stupid. One version is all you need really, give people the choice of what to install when they install it.
    This is possibly a good idea and then when they get the choice of installing the different edition i only think they should get the choice of 4, Home basic, Home Premium, Business, and Ultimate. Home Basic will be for Netbooks, and Started edition will be dropped. Home Premium and Business editions should have the language packs like Enterprise and Ultimate editions have, but with limitations. Home Premium users should be ale to download two language packs and Businuess users should be able to download up to 5 Language packs.
    Monday, May 18, 2009 9:15 PM
  • KISS - Keep it simple stupid. Why go for so many versions? It will just confuse people and its stupid. One version is all you need really, give people the choice of what to install when they install it.
    This is possibly a good idea and then when they get the choice of installing the different edition i only think they should get the choice of 4, Home basic, Home Premium, Business, and Ultimate. Home Basic will be for Netbooks, and Started edition will be dropped. Home Premium and Business editions should have the language packs like Enterprise and Ultimate editions have, but with limitations. Home Premium users should be ale to download two language packs and Businuess users should be able to download up to 5 Language packs.
    i disagree a bit.  Home basic is a joke. In vista it is totally watered down, it is similar in xp but xp only offered xp home or xp pro.  I think there should only be Home premium, Pro and Ultimate.  In netbooks it should be home premium since they are now making netbooks with 2-3gigs and larger hd then 16gig.  I have seen them with 160gigs.

    the only thing I would like to see is virtulazation in home premium.  I understand that pro and ultimate will have it but there are home users that would like to use older programs that they cannot use now in vista, and if virtualization was added in home premium, microsoft would find more people will be attracted to buy it.

    robin
    Monday, May 18, 2009 11:00 PM
  • KISS - Keep it simple stupid. Why go for so many versions? It will just confuse people and its stupid. One version is all you need really, give people the choice of what to install when they install it.
    This is possibly a good idea and then when they get the choice of installing the different edition i only think they should get the choice of 4, Home basic, Home Premium, Business, and Ultimate. Home Basic will be for Netbooks, and Started edition will be dropped. Home Premium and Business editions should have the language packs like Enterprise and Ultimate editions have, but with limitations. Home Premium users should be ale to download two language packs and Businuess users should be able to download up to 5 Language packs.
    i disagree a bit.  Home basic is a joke. In vista it is totally watered down, it is similar in xp but xp only offered xp home or xp pro.  I think there should only be Home premium, Pro and Ultimate.  In netbooks it should be home premium since they are now making netbooks with 2-3gigs and larger hd then 16gig.  I have seen them with 160gigs.

    the only thing I would like to see is virtulazation in home premium.  I understand that pro and ultimate will have it but there are home users that would like to use older programs that they cannot use now in vista, and if virtualization was added in home premium, microsoft would find more people will be attracted to buy it.

    robin
    yea, maybe they should just take out Home basic.but in a way i do agree with microsoft on how XP only being in business, Unlimate, and Enterprise editions, but not the Home editions... i think its not included in the Home editions of Windows 7 because XP mode is not really a consumer feature of the operating system and is more so aimed towards business users.... Most consumers woudn't know what do to with it and the feature may get removed because of them if it gets added to all the Windows 7 versions.
    Monday, May 18, 2009 11:15 PM
  • The Home Premium version should have that.  The Vista home premium version has it.  I don't think they will be taking features away from the new OS.
    Tuesday, May 19, 2009 2:07 AM
  • They figure it's understood.  There are too many processors that are not compatible with a 64 bit OS.  Both versions will be available.  Probably on the same Disk as Vista has done.
    • Proposed as answer by Pjunkm Tuesday, May 19, 2009 2:10 AM
    Tuesday, May 19, 2009 2:09 AM
  • just a word about pricing: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13924_3-10242555-64.html. that doesn't sound good.
    Mob. AMD64 3000+, 1 G RAM, Mob. ATIRadeon9700, 20x DVDRW, C:XPSP3 (55G),D:WIN7 (25G),F:DATA (250G)
    Tuesday, May 19, 2009 10:27 AM
  • Sanmartin -

    Yeah... I read the gist of that on ZDNet the other day. Smells like FUD to me. We don't know pricing - yet. All kinds of speculation with nothing concrete to go on will get us exactly - NOWHERE...
    Tuesday, May 19, 2009 11:34 AM
  • Sanmartin -

    Yeah... I read the gist of that on ZDNet the other day. Smells like FUD to me. We don't know pricing - yet. All kinds of speculation with nothing concrete to go on will get us exactly - NOWHERE...
    The source on cnet was said to be from Dell and you can be your bottom dollar OEMs have already been given an interim pricing already, especially as W7 is now on RC
    Tuesday, May 19, 2009 2:39 PM
  • GI7OMY -

    They may have floated a "trial balloon" pricing by the OEMs - but as it is now, it hasn't been written in stone..
    Tuesday, May 19, 2009 7:25 PM
  • I don't know.

    What about offering keys for the current Windows 7 RC 7100 build for people testing it out?

    What will the RTM versions be like in comparison to the RC 7100 feature-wise is what I would like to know.


    GA P35 DQ6 Mb, Intel Wolfdale 8600 3.33Ghz C2D CPU., 4x2Gb Mushkin DDR2 1066 PC2 8500 Ascents Memory Mods., PNY-nVidia GE Force 8800 GTS (640MB), 4-Western Digital Caviar SATA(2) HDD's (internal), 1 EIDE-USB External; Hauppauge PVR 1600 TV tuner, Dual Monitor: (1) Standard up top, (1) WideScreen below; Altec Lansign Speakers...
    Friday, May 22, 2009 4:33 PM
  • David -

    1.) Er.. You're kiddin.. Right? Let's say there's 10 million people testing the RC... 10 million x say $100. That's like a BILLION dollars given away as a freebie.

    2.) If the release notes on the RC are to be believed, the RTM will be pretty much identical to the RC - only with fewer bugs and maybe a few performance tweaks. The RC is supposed to be feature complete.
    Friday, May 22, 2009 6:32 PM
  • egads -

    That number's quite deceptive... How many duplicate Nvidia 9800 GT cards are there out there? How many duplicate AMD CPUs? Intel CPUs? Printers? etc... et al...ad nauseum...

    Besides.. My box barely has 60 devices listed in the Device Manager. Some others may be more tricked out, others not so much.

    That won't tell you much of anything. The number of downloads won't be all that accurate either. How many people actually were impatient enough to risk a download by way of a torrent site? How many people burned multiple copies for their friends/colleagues?

    And WHERE did you come up with that $30 figure? If a typical Home Premium of Vista goes for $99 (ok.. I rounded it off, sue me), then how do you figure $30?

    Now then, if you really thought this through all the way - let's say Microsoft announced that - as a good will gesture, and thanks for all our hard work testing and beating the Beta and RC half to death - they were going to give all participants a copy of Home Premium (subject to all the usual legal restrictions, of course). Don't you think that would do any of the following:

    A.) Jam up the download servers for those late comers who want a piece of free OS pie..
    B.) Make the torrents for Win 7 EXTRA popular given those too frustrated to download a legit copy to do whatever they could to qualify..
    C.) Raise the number of people testing the RC to at least 10 million - if not more... (if it isn't already there...)
    D.) Any and all of the above.

    Even if they waited until the RC was no longer available through them, that would make B.) above even more popular.

    I don't know about you, but I would guess most everyone who's participating in the Beta and RC program are upgraders. I sure didn't build a new box just to test 7 out. I merely recycled a hard drive I had Vista RC1 loaded on.

    As far as advertisement goes... That's a hit or miss. There are plenty of people who like the OS, and then there are those who are anything but thrilled with it. And the fact that those knowledgable enthusiasts already HAVE the OS and have been playing around with it for the past few months or so, they should be able to give out a positive or negative point of view without the benefit of apparent bribery...

    And you just KNOW the ABM (Anything BUT Microsoft) crowd would likely accuse anyone getting a freebie of being bribed or on the take...

    Saturday, May 23, 2009 10:05 AM


  • (1)  That number's quite deceptive...My box barely has 60 devices listed in the Device Manager.


    (2)  if you really thought this through all the way...I merely recycled a hard drive I had Vista RC1 loaded on.


    (3)  As far as advertisement goes...enthusiasts already HAVE the OS...apparent bribery...





    (1)  Check Device Manager for PnP 0c0B, your computer's fan.  Don't see it listed, eh?  Did you know there's like 96-bits ID (huge number) in PCI headers ?

    (2)  I think you over-estimate the public's interest.  They'll take whatever comes in the box.  Like your example, gleeful it's not Vista.

    (3)



    egads -

    And you underestimate the power of FREE. Especially when it comes to something that is percieved as being desirable - as you yourself pointed out - "gleeful it's not Vista.." With the very positive spin on Windows 7, it's bound to attract a LOT of buyers - and upgraders. Should Microsoft decide to give it away to those who are public BETA testers, that would most certainly attract a LOT of attention.
    Saturday, May 23, 2009 8:50 PM
  • egads -

    For what it's worth - we're both guessing since neither of us know how many actual beta testers there actually are.

    Either way - I doubt Microsoft is going to give anything away if they don't have to especiallly if it's something that can be SOLD.

    You also underestimate basic greed. Ok. So let's say the guy doing the beta test doesn't like it. He still gets his freebie. So he turns around and sells it on eBay, or a swap meet, or whatever - and pockets $50.

    Sunday, May 24, 2009 7:11 AM
  • Hello? Mac users only have one OS and they get by fine. There is no need to make different versions. Leopard runs equally well on hacked netbooks and the nicest Mac Pros. Clearly, Apple knows that users don't want to have to choose between different OS's. Also, why does Microsoft still offer 32-bit? It is just a way for them to make more money off the 64 bit versions of their OS's.
    Sunday, May 24, 2009 6:07 PM
  • Davisbnjm -

    Last I heard, the latest "service pack" for Leopard (10.5.7) apparently BROKE all those hackintoshed netbooks. Whoops.

    As far as making up your mind goes - it's really NOT that confusing. There are two editions the general public will likely ever see. Home Premium and Professional are the only ones you're likely to see on store shelves. Ultimate will be available by Anytime Upgrade only - and that's something only the most diehard users are likely to ever get. Starter and Home Basic are meant for developing countries.

    Given Professional will now have all of the features of Home Premium, it makes choosing your version very simple - do you need to connect to a domain server? Yes or no?  If yes, then Professional, if not - Home premium will likely be more than adequate. And if the guy buys Home Premium and it ISN'T enough, he too can get an Anytime Upgrade to Professional or Ultimate.

    As far as why Microsoft offers a 32 bit version - that much is rather obvious. There are over 1 billion computers in the world. Not every one of them is capable of running 64 bit OS's. There's no reason why those computers can't have access to the latest OS provided they've got a fast enough chip and enough RAM to make it work reasonably well. It's the same reason why Leopard can run on a G4 or G5 Mac made before the company switched to Intel chips. Of course, with the next release - Snow Leopard - things will change as Apple drops all support for non-Intel hardware.
    Sunday, May 24, 2009 8:25 PM
  • Have a look at this nice presentation preview, if you haven't yet: http://uxevangelist.blogspot.com/2009/05/windows-7-more-of-new-7.html. On the "retail kiosk" two black packages are shown that seem to be Ultimate versions.
    Mob. AMD64 3000+, 1 G RAM, Mob. ATIRadeon9700, 20x DVDRW, C:XPSP3 (55G),D:WIN7 (25G),F:DATA (250G)
    Monday, May 25, 2009 12:11 PM
  • Just use ONE edition...... Like Steve Jobs from Apple said once, with Mac OS X everybody get's the ultimate!

    Having different priced versions will have many users pulled to the cheapest, and apply malicious software from the internet to patch/break system files to unlock extra funcionality.
    That is an attracktion for many!
    And they are right in some way: the Ultimate is some $150 more then the cheapest.

    Just one edition, no jealosy among people......
    Tuesday, May 26, 2009 10:40 AM
  • dont feel bad id do the same thing if my pc could handle it (hd was TOOO small 80gb)
    but hey win7 works perfect after i took out my 360 hd hahaha:





    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01069708&cc=us&dlc=en&lc=en&jumpid=reg_R1002_USEN
    Wednesday, May 27, 2009 4:42 AM
  • This doesn't follow the above discussion but might be of interest, too:

    "Purchasers of Acer PCs in Australia have already found a slip in their freshly unboxed system which states “Beginning June 26, 2009, customers who purchase a qualifying ACER Vista-based PC will receive a comparable version of Windows 7 when available”."
    (www.apcmag.com, yesterday)

    Mob. AMD64 3000+, 1 G RAM, Mob. ATIRadeon9700, 20x DVDRW, C:XPSP3 (55G),D:WIN7 (25G),F:DATA (250G)
    Wednesday, May 27, 2009 10:20 AM
  • Thats what I think. People seem to assume one verison will cost a lot, it wont. Keep the price low and it will be fine. Did Windows 98 have 50 or so verisons? No.
    Saturday, May 30, 2009 5:03 PM
  • Erm there is such thing as customazing it at install. Plus, I'm sure you don't use every single feature on the Os of your choice anyway
    Saturday, May 30, 2009 5:04 PM
  • Thats what I think. People seem to assume one verison will cost a lot, it wont. Keep the price low and it will be fine. Did Windows 98 have 50 or so verisons? No.

    Chris -

    No... Windows 98 didn't. But then again, there was such a thing as NT 4 for those who needed a more stable platform. So even back then, there were two flavors of Windows - the consumer 9x line and the business NT line. It wasn't until XP that both lines were finally merged into one codebase.
    Saturday, May 30, 2009 7:19 PM
  • Thats what I think. People seem to assume one verison will cost a lot, it wont. Keep the price low and it will be fine. Did Windows 98 have 50 or so verisons? No.

    Chris -

    No... Windows 98 didn't. But then again, there was such a thing as NT 4 for those who needed a more stable platform. So even back then, there were two flavors of Windows - the consumer 9x line and the business NT line. It wasn't until XP that both lines were finally merged into one codebase.

    A software developer once told me that Microsoft should never have merged the Win9x line with the NT line. Everything I've been reading here seems to prove that point. Looking back, I'm inclined to agree that there should still be a separate consumer line and a corporate line of Windows. That system worked well in the past and left no questions as to which version of windows a person needed. That being said, I'll admit Windows XP Was a successful merger of two technologies that didn't need an equivalent super computer processor to make it run. Under Windows XP, most of your applications still worked well without having to go out to upgrade everthing. With Windows Vista, Server 2008, and now Windows 7, well my reactions are quite mixed. It does have too many flavours to choose from, older applications may or may not run, and most certainly it still needs the latest microprocessors to make it all work. So where is the value in all of this?
    Sunday, May 31, 2009 4:14 PM
  • I don't know. Things have changed since the Win9x line, and looking back, the networking and security advances that were brought from NT to the "consumer line" in XP (with all their faults) are a must-have for today's consumers that are used and forced to have reliable internet (and home network) connections all the time, if only to get the needed updates to their drivers etc. If one thing - in the past - spoke against XP, it was that it required better hardware than before, and with your old hardware you noticed an important slowdown compared to Win98 SE. Even Windows ME, with a few implements from the upcoming XP, was slower than this "lean" version. On the other side, Win7 is - well, it's my personal experience, opinion and not carved in stone - the very first new OS from Microsoft that is remarkably faster than its precedessor. I find no proof anywhere in my daily work and testing that this "it still needs the latest microprocessors to make it all work" is even near the truth.
    The other thing with the "flavors" is something I don't understand at all. How much will be there? Three: Home (with reduced versions for smaller purses and/or weaker equipment), Professional (with extended features for the "Enterprise" sector with more licenses, more administration needs and what) and an "Ultimate" (for the 8-core-, 156 G-RAM and RAID128 freak with 4 video cards and need for 75 languages, as I understand it). And that's incredibly worse than two: Consumer and Non-consumer line? I don't get the point.
    Mob. AMD64 3000+, 1 G RAM, Mob. ATIRadeon9700, 20x DVDRW, C:XPSP3 (55G),D:WIN7 (25G),F:DATA (250G)
    Sunday, May 31, 2009 7:15 PM
  • A software developer once told me that Microsoft should never have merged the Win9x line with the NT line. Everything I've been reading here seems to prove that point. Looking back, I'm inclined to agree that there should still be a separate consumer line and a corporate line of Windows. That system worked well in the past and left no questions as to which version of windows a person needed. That being said, I'll admit Windows XP Was a successful merger of two technologies that didn't need an equivalent super computer processor to make it run. Under Windows XP, most of your applications still worked well without having to go out to upgrade everthing. With Windows Vista, Server 2008, and now Windows 7, well my reactions are quite mixed. It does have too many flavours to choose from, older applications may or may not run, and most certainly it still needs the latest microprocessors to make it all work. So where is the value in all of this?

    Rick -

    The value in Vista and 7 - is in security. As long as you have drivers that work properly for the hardware, it's a LOT more secure than XP. The fact that the drivers were pulled out of the Kernal mode and put into the user mode made it even more stable. If driver X blows up, it doesn't take the whole machine down with it.

    The only apps that are seriously broken under Vista/7 are those apps that weren't coded using Microsoft's guidelines for how to program for XP in the first place. Back in 2001 when XP was released, Microsoft published a list of best practices. These included silly little things like "Don't use the registry as a means to pass communications between modules." So, for 6 years after the fact, many programmers ignored these bits of wisdom - and when Vista came out, their apps were broken suddenly. And I'm not talking about some obscure programmers writting obscure apps - I mean major players like INTUIT. It wasn't until their 2006 version that they finally stopped writing to the registry to pass stuff between Quickbooks (and likely Quicken, Turbo Tax and all of their other apps) modules.

    How soon people forget two very simple facts about XP.

    1.) When XP came out, it was slow and unresponsive - kinda like the way people percieved Vista.
    2.) The hardware caught up and surpassed XP's requirements by leaps and bounds in the 6 years between XP's release and Vista's release.

    Back when XP was first released, there was a chorus of how bad XP sucked. It was slow. It was bloated. It was good ol' Windows 2000 in a clown suit. It required GOBS of RAM (512 MB) to make it work good.

    And yet, within a few years, it's gotten to the point where people are clinging to it with a death grip. Hardware got faster. RAM got cheaper. Disk space became less of an issue as drives went from 4 GB to over 1 TB. XP became the defacto standard.

    If anything, the same sort of things will happen with Vista and 7. Though - with Win 7 - that's not as likley to happen as long as the drivers are available.
    Sunday, May 31, 2009 9:27 PM
  • I agree with many other posters, Home basic or starter is a waste and in my oppinion and a rip off. I am aware you want a marketing that makes money but why not make just the Home Premium as the starter to make people think they get something special as a base edition. I mean it really is a lot better than starter and basic but just simply a waste.  Isn't this the age of media PC's? so how come starter and home basic don't even have Windows Media Center or even worse in the starter can't even change walpapers or access to multi screens? Are you trying to take over 3rd world country computing or something? Why don't you get o' Billy who is very generous on blowing his wealth to all kinds of charities to get rid of starter and use basic to whoever wants a OS that is less capable than an OS from 6 years ago as an OEM version and throw Premium, Pro, and Ultimate on the shelves. I am aware that Enterprise and Ultimate is just a different name and the difference is licensing which makes much more sense but as a Microsoft fanatic I am even furious of the low level OS introductions since I'll have to end up explaining service customers I fought over not to buy a Mac why their new Windows 7 computer has a garbage OS on it. This is as others stated Windows getting very thick walls and Mac seems more and more attractive to them.
    Monday, June 01, 2009 8:10 AM
  • Rick I have to absolutely agree with you. I have to say XP became a superior operating system and until app vendors worked out all their bugs had the same reputation as Vista and 7 but should stay in corporate/business environment to avoid help desk disasters for at least 1 more year. But as you said by the current hardware available we should move on from XP and go with something newer as it is more secure and better. If people want to stick with NT kinda technology they can bang their head on the wall with LINUX for all I care and whover says we should have stuck with Win 9x I don't know what to tell them. Merging consumer line and corporate line not a good idea? Hello! This is 2009 where you don't use a 28k modem; people work from home, connect to VPN networks, share media, now even run Home Server available for 600 bucks to share their photos which is based on Server 2003 Small Business with a Vista makeover. Not a good idea? It brought things in gear and took us to todays technology in my oppinion
    Monday, June 01, 2009 8:22 AM
  • Jay -

    Home Basic and Starter editions won't even be marketed anywhere in the "developed world" - meaning North America, Europe, Japan and China.

    It's not a means to "take over 3rd world computing" - as Microsoft already OWNS that segment (sort of). In case you haven't noticed, many places where Home Basic and Starter WILL be offered will be in areas of the world where piracy is rampant. You can walk down the street in many places and buy a pirated copy of XP, Vista, Office, etc... for chump change - $2.00 USD per disk. By offering a low cost, low end version, it gives the masses over there a means to get legit. By being legit, these people can get updates for Windows, Office, etc... If nothing else, this could potentially reduce the spread of things like Conficker and the like. There was a patch out for the exploit Conficker used to gain access available on October 26th, 2008. And yet, it spread like wildfire - coincidentally in areas where piracy reigns supreme. And Windows Updates just aren't the norm.

    I'm going to go out on a limb and guess you're from somewhere in the U.S. - just by the language used in your post. As such, your average client isn't going to likely EVER see Starter or Home Basic on any of their computers. Not even if they were sold a netbook. In fact, the only two editions ANYONE would ever see if they were shopping for a computer will be Home PREMIUM and Professional. Ultimate won't even be on the shelves. It's my understanding that Ultimate will only be available as an "Anytime Upgrade" - meaning you go to the web, buy yourself a copy of Ultimate, get the product key for it, insert your original DVD into the drive, and run the installer. Plug in the product key given to you on the web and it does an upgrade install, unlocking the features found in Ultimate that aren't available in the lower SKUs.

    And no, I doubt too many Netbooks will be shipping with Starter - even after Microsoft removed the 3 running app limit. You're right - people are spoiled and they want features. I figure most vendors of netbooks will likely go for at least Home Premium. Though - one limitation of a netbook kinda makes me wonder what the point would be. Most of them don't come with internal optical drives - no DVDs... No way to play back what isn't there.

    Monday, June 01, 2009 8:37 AM
  • To put it short: You're suggesting to MS they should start a new, 21st century charity campaign, buy everone here and there a new equipment based on the latest standard, bring their internet connections to the levels of Japan and Europe (US standards are not so good in nationwide availability and speed), change most businesses' (worldwide! including the richest parts!) hard and software etc.etc. - only to permit Redmond to sell the one-for-all edition that has to respect no requirements at all and works for everyone from the first moment with all his beautiful "home server" needs...
    "Hello! This is 2009 where you don't use a 28k modem; people work from home, connect to VPN networks, share media, now even run Home Server available for 600 bucks to share their photos which is based on Server 2003 Small Business with a Vista makeover." Hello! You're living in a dream world.
    Mob. AMD64 3000+, 1 G RAM, Mob. ATIRadeon9700, 20x DVDRW, C:XPSP3 (55G),D:WIN7 (25G),F:DATA (250G)
    Monday, June 01, 2009 8:46 AM
  • My understanding of Romote Desktop (although I have never used it) is that the only computer that needs Remote Desktop built into Windows is the "Server," that is, the one you will be controlling. For the controller computer, you need to simply download a client that will run on any edition of windows. I know there is one available for the XP Remote Desktop at download.microsoft.com, but I'm not sure about Windows Home Server, but you should be able to find documentation for that. (I should probably try WHS myself sometime.)
    • Proposed as answer by jeh_it Sunday, June 21, 2009 1:52 AM
    Sunday, June 21, 2009 1:52 AM
  • I didn't see any 32 bit/64 bit options.... what's up with that ??

    What are you talking about?
    Sunday, June 21, 2009 1:54 AM
  • The real PR problem with Vista was the totally unrealistic 'minimum' specs that were issued.

    I had to work one time on a brand new computer with Home Basic - it had 512 MB of RAM (the 'minimum') - it ran like molasses on a winter's day and took almost 10 full MINUTES before I could even do anything.

    PLEASE - when specs are being issued for W7 - make them realistic

    However, I do agree that there are far too many variants - and why should the Remote Desktop be only on the 'higher' end machines - it's the beginners who NEED that if they are to be helped

    According to my testing of Windows 7 in low memory virtual machines, at least the minumum memory statement for Windows 7 is more than adequate. Ever seen an old Windows 2000 computer? The virtual machine with 512 MB ran just about as fast or maybe faster. (The stated minumum for Windows 7 x86 is 1 GB of Memory. It is designed to use less memory than Vista, which is supposed to have a 512 MB minimum.)

    And as to the Remote Desktop being necessary for beginners, there is another tool in Windows specifically for them "Windows Remote Assistance" (Start > All Programs > Maintenance) which has been part of Windows since XP. Remote desktop is for business users who need to access their work computer from home (or for the geeks who when they are asked to play a song on their computer have it come out of another computer at the other corner of the room).
    Sunday, June 21, 2009 2:59 AM
  • Yeah, there should be only one menu item at McDonalds too.    After all, one size DOES fit all, right?  

    Everyone conveniently forgets that there are FOUR versions of XP also.   So much hand wringing over a non issue.  

    95% of you will get Home Premium, the rest will spring for Ultimate.   So you have 2 choices.   Businesses have 2 choices - Pro or Enterprise.   What is "so confusing" about that?

    I have Vista Ultimate and now 7 Ultimate, both 64.    Easy choice there, as I have an MSDN subscription.


    I don't know if 95% is the number, but Home Premium Edition will undoubtedly account for a very large percentage.  Millions of computers with Home Premium will ship each month.  But when considering which edition, Home Premium or Ultimate, I am somewhat confused by the information I read.  (Maybe even fretting a bit, since I'd likely be among the Home Premium crowd).

    This article  Windows 7 Lineup Offers Clear Choice for Consumers and Businesses  speaks of two primary editions.  "With Windows 7 there will be two primary editions: Windows 7 Home Premium, and Windows 7 Professional. We think those two SKUs will meet most customers’ needs."
     
    However, this site  Windows Virtual PC  mentions an Ultimate edition too.  "Windows Virtual PC Beta, a feature of Windows 7 Professional, Windows 7 Ultimate, and Windows 7 Enterprise, provides you the capability to run multiple Windows environments such as Windows XP Mode from your Windows 7 desktop."


    There are two reasons I might fret about this.  First, aside from my confusion about the higher-level editions, it seems clear that Home Premium will be one.  As best as I can determine, it will not have Group Policy editing provisions.  (gpedit/RSAT).  Somebody please correct me if I am wrong.  I have noticed in this forum that much of the more knowledgeable advice assumes I will have access to GP.  Yet, if Naddy's comment is close to correct (95%), and my understanding is also correct, then a huge audience of Windows 7 users will be without this ability to manage and tweak (GP).  Namely, Home Premium users.

    Second, as an adjusted Vista user, I am not trying to retro-support XP or run a virtual environment.  But again, I'd like to give it a go.  It seems very clear that MS Virtual-PC will not be available in Windows 7 Home Premium Edition.  Again, correct me if I am wrong.  This is a confusing strategy to me.  I mean, us Vista users, we're already more than half-way there in terms of making the transition to Windows 7.  But XP users that resisted Vista?  It would seem Microsoft would be especially interested in migrating XP users to Windows 7.  Many would be in the Home Premium category, right?  Maybe even 95% ?  Yet Windows XP Mode is omitted.  I don't get it.


    egads -

    It's simple. Why would a home user need/want XP Mode? Is it a mission critical business application that was custom written to the tune of a a million dollars or so, won't run on anything beyond XP and the guy who wrote it retired and is no longer around? Or is it a game of some sort?

    XP Mode isn't for games - especially games that are graphically intensive (which would be most of them). The experience would be slow and sucky at best even with the latest quad core speed demon on the market.

    The purpose of XP Mode is to give business' who have a real need the opportunity to get on the latest OS and not have to worry about their custom apps not working.
    Sunday, June 21, 2009 3:12 AM
  • Jeh_it -

    Actually XP Pro already has remote desktop built in - both as remote (the box controlling) and host (the box being controlled). There IS an updated version that allows Win XP boxes to talk properly with Server 2003 and later boxes, but the one that shipped with XP Pro SP2 will get you connected to pretty much any other XP Pro box or laptop.

    Sunday, June 21, 2009 3:17 AM
  • XP mode is widely publicized and highly touted.  Unlike experienced authorities like yourself, Wolfie, us simple-minded users trust and expect to find that usable XP mode in Win7.  That might even be the magic ingredient that motivates us to upgrade, whether we need it or not.  We will feel cheated if XP mode is not there, or is not really what we were led to believe.

    People respond badly to feeling abused, disappointed, deceived or flat-out cheated.  You have spoken so often about ABM-ers (Anything But Microsoft-ers).  I am not so aware of them or their reasons, as you apparently are.  You seem to think they want to persecute Microsoft.  Frankly, I can understand how this XP-mode thing would contribute to their sentiments.  But it's not persecution.  It's just hard feelings.



    egads -

    Widely publicized? Highly touted? By who? Most of the reviews I've read of it seem to make it out to be not such a hot, nor such a big deal. If anything, they've gone out of their way to seriously DOWNPLAY it's overall value. And under NO circumstances do they say it's a kewl thing to use to play old games with. ALL of them explain what it's for, ALL of them explain it's a part of Professional, Enterprise/Ultimate.

    Examples of such can be found here:

    ZDNet: Ed Bott - Why all the fuss about XP Mode?
    ZDNet: Jason Perlow: Windows 7's XP Virtualization: I TOLD YOU SO!
    WinSuperSite.com: Paul Thurrot: Secret No More: Revealing Windows XP Mode For Windows 7
    ZDNet: Adrian Kingsley Hughes: Verdict: XP Mode Gets an F
    Sunday, June 21, 2009 7:58 AM
  • egads -

    OK.. You lost me. You're making it sound first off that Microsoft is making XP Mode out to be something like Vista Ultimate Extras were - overpromising and underdelivering. I don't see that.

    Most common, everyday ordinary software - at least the stuff I use, the stuff I see on my client's machines, etc.. - all have Vista compatible versions. Heck, even Intuit's gotten their act together and made QuickBooks and their other wares work properly on Vista.

    Name something - ANYTHING - that your typical HOME user would need that doesn't have a newer, Vista compatible version.

    The page you linked to doesn't explicitly say Win 7 Pro or greater. All it mentions for system requirements is that your CPU must support it and it's got to be supported by the motherboard as well. OK. Thus far what version of Win 7 is available? With the exception of those specifically testing the lesser versions, I'd guess at least 99% of everyone else is using ULTIMATE at the moment... The point is - the page in question isn't written in stone - and can be updated to clarify things when the time is right.

     Btw, the page DOES mention Win 7 Professional in the right sidebar... The "Getting Started" tab only mentions Small Business, IT professionals and Developers. I don't see "Home Users" nor "Home Premium" mentioned anywhere on the page. In fact, pretty much everything on the page seems to be directed at business'. So how exactly, again, are home users going to be misled into thinking this is going to be something aimed at them? How exactly are they going to be disappointed?
    Sunday, June 21, 2009 10:59 AM
  • egads -

    No.. I didn't say want... I said "NEED". The "classic start menu" and XP's Explorer aren't dire needs. Running your OS from inside of a virtual OS just doesn't sound very smart. Especially given the host OS (Win 7) has more robust tools to handle things. That'd be kind of like trying to fly the space shuttle with the computer from an Apollo space craft or maybe driving a Forumla 1 race car with the steering from a Model T. It's the wrong approach.

    Ok.. So let's say you're John Public. You hear about Windows 7. You hear about XP Mode. What do you think they're going to do?

    I don't know about anyone else - but the first thing I would do is a bit of research. Maybe a Wikipedia search for "XP Mode" Google IS your friend... So is Bing. And you'll get a plethora of articles that outline what it's about.

    Fine, I'll admit there are likely to be some people out there who are crazy enough to try running some old game that won't work any other way under XP Mode and they'll likely fail and maybe they might have hard feelings. But if they're going to go through all those hoops to get that stuff up and running, they probably have clue. And if they're NOT, they'll likely get someone who is to help them who does and will set them straight.

    I don't see the big whoop over it.

    Sunday, June 21, 2009 12:55 PM
  • egads -

    Actually, I do need Win 7. More than the average Joe Sixpack. Mainly because there are folks out there who will be getting computers preloaded with it and I'd wind up looking pretty silly with that "deer in the headlights" look if I had to support them without having a clue as to what I'm doing. It pays to be ahead of the curve.

    But you're right. The avergage guy on the street probably could do without.

    I find it hard to believe that there are hundreds of millions of people who are going to be tricked into thinking anything. People aren't nearly as daft as you make them out to be. Ok... SOME of them might be. But 100's of millions?
    Sunday, June 21, 2009 7:23 PM
  • Average Joe Public.

    In my experience, I think PC's have been around long enough that these kind of people can know enough to be dangerous. These are the kind of people who know how to turn on their PC's to launch the one or two applications they really need, they will sit there and admire someone that can show them what else a PC can do, and in the end, they can get very upset because an icon has been moved or some feature in a progam has been inadvertently turned off. With Virtual XP mode, you can be assured there will be those that would try to run their computer from within it. This kind of reminds me of back when IBM's OS/2 was out and people would try to do things from within it's Windows 3.1 emulation just to find it did not work the way they expected it to or worse yet, their system would lock up. I know, I used to be one of those kind of people back then.

    On a positive note, I would really like to see the Windows Virtual PC product to be made available to ALL versions of Windows 7, be it optionally or as a add-on. I would also like to see the product extended into Windows Vista and Server 2008. For an advanced user, it certainly offers a way to run programs that can't be upgraded to run under Windows 7 directly. However, it must be stressed and re-stressed again that XP Mode is just an emulation and may not be the perfect solution to make an older program run.
    Sunday, June 21, 2009 8:39 PM
  • Will Microsoft continue to rip the Australian public off by doubling the prices of their software paid by consumers in USA? We all know the exchange rate is approximately 70 Australian cents to one American dollar but yet we continue to pay more than double the price of Microsoft software in Australia. If Microsoft is seriously about limiting piracy of their software in Australia they should treat the Australian public with more respect and not contempt and charge us prices that are on par with prices charged in USA.

    What do others think about this issue?

    Monday, June 22, 2009 10:36 AM
  • When Windows Vista Ultimate - the full version was first released in Canada, it sold for about $500.00 CDN.
    The price is about 2/3rd's of that now. It was one of the contributing factors why I did not accept Vista so soon. All previous versions of Windows originally sold in the range of $200.00 to $250.00 CDN for the full version. I understand Microsoft has to try and recover some of the man-hours they have invested in developing it's software, but you would think that with the shear number of computers out there that the cost to the consumer could be made considerably less. It certainly would cut down on the software being pirated.
    Monday, June 22, 2009 9:46 PM
  • Has anyone seen this yet: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-en/upgrade-windows-E? According to tgdaily (http://www.tgdaily.com/content/view/42974/140), this "under construction" page will explain European users what a "clean update" is and what steps Mom and Dad are required to do if they want to save their settings, personal files and - well, "save" isn't the right word here - programs when "migrating" from Vista to Windows 7. When the report is true - it announces a MS statement for tomorrow -, there will be no (in-place-) upgrade option for us happy Europeans. A somewhat humorous advice from the quoted site: "Perhaps the simplest option for European users wanting to upgrade to Win7 would be to ask a friend in the US to buy a proper copy of the OS and mail it to them."


    Mobile AMD64 3000+, VIA Apollo K8T800 chipset, 1 G RAM, ATIRadeonMobility 9700, 20x DVDRW, C:XPSP3 (55G),D:WIN7 (25G),F:DATA (250G)
    Wednesday, June 24, 2009 2:21 PM
  • i agree- xp mode should be offered in home premium too.  Some users who have a small business but at home have vista home premium and would like to put their application that they are running in their office on their home premium computer so they have the usage of it when they are at leisure if they are traveling or even if their small business is not home based and they want to use this application. 

    I use home premium actually for my business.  I find that for me advertising in newspapers cost a fortune and doesn't work.  I give seminars to non profit organziations on "how to keep your computer safe" and I have been giving it on "tips and tricks for using Vista".  I plan to upgrade this computer to windows 7 once it comes out to the public.  Right now I have going on ms virtual pc 2007.  Yes it says it doesn't support home premium but after going on the ms forums everyone there said it would work.  I would like to show users virtual pc with xp pro sp3.  I believe more home users would make the switch to windows 7 if this was offered and home users who have small businesses but can't afford to buy several computers at this time for their home based businesses.

    robin
    Wednesday, June 24, 2009 4:29 PM
  • XP Mode:

    . . . "Is it a mission critical business application that was custom written to the tune of a a million dollars or so, won't run on anything beyond XP and the guy who wrote it retired and is no longer around" . . .

    The quote is from an earlier post and I would like to say I'm one of those people who fit into that catagory. Someone else I know works in the oil patch and is faced with the same problem. It would be interesting to find out how many other people out there won't upgrage to the Windows 6x code base (Win7, 2008, Vista) because of compatibility issues with legacy apps which in itself would have a slim chance of ever being updated. I'm sure Microsoft realizes this too, which is the reason why they went out and acquired a virtualization product in the first place. The part I hate is how they can dictate who or who is not eligible to obtain this product because of the operating system version you may have. I had first hand experience at this when Microsoft first introduce Virtual PC 2004. Back then, Microsoft was offering the product as an upgrade to existing Connectix customers who had the product before Microsoft aquired it. The catch was you had to have Windows XP Pro installed on your computer before they would send out the updated product. They originally rejected me because I had Windows XP Home running on my computer. The reason they cited was Vitual PC 2004 needed to have the active directory component of Windows XP Professional to run, ...so they said. It was only after I sent in a proof of purchace and scanned in images of the UPC code and box lables that I was finally able to get the updated product sent to me. Hopefully, Microsoft won't make a person jump through hoops like this in order get the XP Mode product for windows 7. This is why I maintain it should be made available to ALL versions of Windows 7.
    Wednesday, June 24, 2009 11:30 PM
  • "Perhaps the simplest option for European users wanting to upgrade to Win7 would be to ask a friend in the US to buy a proper copy of the OS and mail it to them."

    And then perhaps the simplest option for those of us wanting to get rid of that stupid entrenched IE would be to ask a friend in EU to buy the E copy of the OS and mail it to us. No in-place upgrade. Oh the horror.
    Thursday, June 25, 2009 10:48 PM
  • Hello
    As this thread was about the editions are there any comments on Microsoft charging UK consumers more like they did on Vista and also not allowing EU consumers to upgrade hence having to spend hours reloading programs and data.

    I have psoted about the prices elsewhere on this forum but see below for EU

    Microsoft points out at http://windows.microsoft.com/upgrade-windows-E :

    A custom installation does not preserve your files, settings, and programs. So, before installing E editions of Windows 7, make sure to back up your files and settings to an external hard disk, USB Flash Drive, or other media. After the installation, move your files and settings back to your PC and reinstall the programs you want to keep using.

    NOT very nice of them is it.

    Malc
    • Proposed as answer by zapbuzz Sunday, June 28, 2009 1:05 PM
    Friday, June 26, 2009 7:54 PM
  • Ok, so I just built a PC. Running W7 RC. I don't have another copy of Windows......

    Can I upgrade from the RC to W7 pro without buying the full version?
    Friday, June 26, 2009 8:29 PM
  • stuckmoto -

    Not likely. There's a few good reasons:

    1.) You'd be violating the upgrade portion of the EULA 8 ways till next Tuesday.
    2.) You really do NOT want to be upgrading Beta or RC code with the final version. There are likely to be unexepcted issues that pop up if you mix beta code with final code.
    3.) Right now, you've got Windows 7 Ultimate on your drive. Should you try installing Windows 7 Professional - that's considered a downgrade. And you really can't downgrade Windows 7 to a lesser version. Upgrade from Pro to Ultimate, yes, From Ultimate to Pro or Home Premium - no. 
    Friday, June 26, 2009 9:21 PM
  • With all the talk about the different editions of Windows 7, I'm curious if the upgrade editions will require you to have a previous version of windows actually installed onto your hard drive? It was a bit of a surprise when I tried to do a clean install by booting into the Windows Vista Upgrade DVD and it told me that I needed to start the install from within my previous version of windows. What I was trying to do at the time was to repartition my hard drive so I can put everything back in fresh. In the past, all you had to do was provide proof of an of a previous version of windows by inserting it's setup disc when the upgrade setup program asked you for it. That was not the case with Vista Upgrade which leaves me wondering if Windows 7 Upgrade will be the same?

    Friday, June 26, 2009 11:18 PM
  • The FAQ says:
    "Microsoft designed Windows 7 Upgrade media for Windows Vista. A customer with Windows XP can purchase Windows 7 Upgrade media but must back up their files, clean install, and then reinstall their applications."

      http://www.microsoft.com/windows/buy/offers/pre-order-faq.aspx
    Friday, June 26, 2009 11:57 PM
  • Rick -

    The Windows 6.x (read Vista and Windows 7) installer does not have the option of checking previous media as proof of ownership. To get around this, it expects you to run the Setup program from within a previous version of Windows.

    That said... There IS a method for installing Vista and 7 without having a previous version installed. Google is your friend.

    The method in question on one hand IS a legit method - otherwise Microsoft would NOT have written it. But as it may also be used to circumvent the EULA, I think I'd rather not mention the details here. Needless to say, it's not a secret and there are many people out there who have written about it and you can easily find reference to how it's done.
    Saturday, June 27, 2009 12:56 AM
  • Hi
    But there will still be no way to upgrade in europe.
    I have vista ultimate. I was thinking of upgrading to 7 ultimate but you cannot purchase the upgrade version in europe you can only purchase the E version which requires a clean install and hours of reloading your programs.
    Microsoft has stuffed us.

    To answer one of the above questions if you down grade from say ultimate to pro then you will have to do a clean install.
    Also the answer above is correct about upgrading rc. Its not worth doing get tthe final version.

    Of course in Europe Microsoft as given us no choice.

    so my next computer looks like being linux

    malc
    Saturday, June 27, 2009 9:55 AM
  • Upgrading / customizing is one of the worlds biggest tech support headaches. If I wanted to stop it and earn money and less stress instead of wasting it on support yeah i'd force everyone into this upgrade / customized cycle because it's not a task for newbies or lazy people in general and with other disto's too.
    Besides the performance output is noticeably better than a old ms upgrade.
    • Edited by zapbuzz Sunday, June 28, 2009 1:15 PM
    Sunday, June 28, 2009 1:09 PM
  • I totally agree with this.  When I got my laptop, which came with Vista Home Premium, it was useless to me....I had used Quicken on my previous laptop, and with XP remoted to it from my desktop in my attic office (where I keep my bills and files).  With Vista Home Premium, you can use Remote Desktop to connect from it to another PC, but you cannot connect to it from another PC.  I ended up getting Vista Ultimate to replace the install on the laptop.

    I see that the Win7 RC is 'Ultimate', and have used Remote Desktop successfully.  I'd like to see RDC fully functional in Win7 Home Premium, so I don't have to spend the extra money for Pro or Ultimate.
    Monday, June 29, 2009 1:45 AM
  • Ed -

    According to the chart on Paul Thurrott's Supersite, all versions of Windows 7 will have Remote Desktop - but only Pro and Enterprise/Ultimate will have the ability to HOST a session of Remote Desktop.
    Monday, June 29, 2009 2:05 AM
  • well, for me i'm either going to get pro or ultimate edition. i'm olny considering the pro edition right now because of the discount from the pre-order upgrade offer and plus the good features in it. i could get home edition, but i am not a consumer type user. the sad thing is that there is no discount on the ultimate edition upgrade, but thats what we get for microsoft promoting the other two editions. at least microsoft is trying to do something right for a change and trying to fix their mistake with Vista...

    At least the RC of Windows 7 is working out good for me and so good in fact that i can keep using it untill the retail copy is released... :) thats my opion.
    Monday, June 29, 2009 2:10 AM
  • i am sure MS will at some point realise, that no matter what lower version people buy within a month or two there will be free apps galore to have even the lowest version working just like ultimate, silly thing is people will still pay extra for the bells and whistles that can be added free of charge.

    I like win 7, but i can get home premium and add on thousands of free apps to make it look and feel better than ultimate...

    so i agree 1 version and let users choose what they want to install, or use.
    Wednesday, July 01, 2009 6:46 AM
  • Does anyone know if windows 7 pro will support 32 and 64 bit systems?
    Sunday, July 05, 2009 8:58 PM
  • samcat -

    Yes, Virginia... There is a 32 bit and a 64 bit version of Win 7 Professional.

    Sunday, July 05, 2009 11:05 PM
  • Exactly, Well Said.
    Apple has ONE version of its client OS X. One Single version. One Price.
    Make the Ultimate as ONE version and price it median of all prices.

    Live free or die - Motto of NH state, USA
    Monday, July 06, 2009 3:03 PM
  • A single SKU fits a billion Apple users. Why Not Windows Users?
    Price the Ultimate version as a single median and simply call it Windows7.
    That's it.
    Iam sure customers will appreciate it a lot more than zillions of versions and combinations.
    Live free or die - Motto of NH state, USA
    Monday, July 06, 2009 3:11 PM
  • A single SKU fits a billion Apple users. Why Not Windows Users?
    Price the Ultimate version as a single median and simply call it Windows7.
    That's it.
    Iam sure customers will appreciate it a lot more than zillions of versions and combinations.
    Live free or die - Motto of NH state, USA

    Anand -

    A BILLION Mac users? There are only a billion odd computers in the world - and last I checked, Apple's market share wasn't anywhere near 100%. More like 5%.

    Surely you exaggerate...

    But seriously... If you compare OSX to Windows 7, you'll note that OSX is lacking a lot of the more advanced networking features found in Windows 7 Ultimate/Enterprise and Professional. In fact, it's closer to Home Premium than anything. You'll note that the price for Home Premium is close to the price for OSX.

    For Microsoft to cut the price of Ultimate down to the price of Home Premium and eliminate the other SKUs would incur the wrath of the DOJ. Why? Because it would be seen as a "predatory move" to gain market share and eliminate the competition.
    Monday, July 06, 2009 7:51 PM
  • I guess i'm missing something. When i preorder windows 7 pro it didn't ask me if I wanted the 32 or 64 bit system. Are they both going to be on the same disk?
    Tuesday, July 07, 2009 3:20 PM
  • I guess i'm missing something. When i preorder windows 7 pro it didn't ask me if I wanted the 32 or 64 bit system. Are they both going to be on the same disk?

    Yes.  The package will include both versions.
    Tuesday, July 07, 2009 9:52 PM
  • Thank you.
    Tuesday, July 07, 2009 10:02 PM

  •    Hello Anthony.

               One question I have never seen mentioned here.   Using Beta or RC of Win-7 is quite nice but what if I need to return to Vista ?  How do I resume that OS ? What use can I make of this saved folder on installing W-7, called Windows-old ?  It has all my data from Vista but what if I desire to activate Vista again ?

              Have a great day.    handcuff
    Thursday, July 09, 2009 1:28 PM
  • Windows 7 Ultimate it is specialized i agree with

     

     

    davehc1

     

    Hi

    i have just upgrade from x p  ultimate to windows  7 ultimate 64 bit  and i agree with Mr. davehc1 it is specialized had no problem Windows 7 Ultimate on updating & all working  fine in fact i need some time to go through the  vestibule  of this intelligent  one (Windows 7 Ultimate)

    So fare I had one small problem is with my HP printer in install it say (The system does not meet one or more of the minimum requirements needed to install this product

    The installation cannot continue)

    But i think i fix it up some other time.

    I must say i miss the tack of com run and some other key point  that i use to do it manually but having me saying that there is lots of new  thing that I rely like it’s so much  

    The screen finger touch

    media player

    I also notes the speed of the explorer and no crash at all   just so smooth and on the top of that it work excellent whit Microsoft Office Word 2007 the pages so white & glossy smooth

    What a nice project wit and intelligent.  

    Regard & respect to all member in the forum

      

     

     


    When something ends‚ something else begins...
    Saturday, July 11, 2009 8:58 AM

  •    Hello Anthony.

               One question I have never seen mentioned here.   Using Beta or RC of Win-7 is quite nice but what if I need to return to Vista ?  How do I resume that OS ? What use can I make of this saved folder on installing W-7, called Windows-old ?  It has all my data from Vista but what if I desire to activate Vista again ?

              Have a great day.    handcuff

    handcuff -

    The simple answer - you need to make a copy of all of your files, favorites, etc... on another drive, a DVD or even a USB thumb drive. Then you'll need to reinstall Vista. The Windows.old directory actually does contain all of your old Vista stuff (or whatever the last OS on your hard drive was). But those files can't be restored to make Vista work. If you look in your Windows.old folder, you'll see other things - like Program Files, as well as the Users directory in there.
    Saturday, July 11, 2009 9:06 AM
  •   3.) Africa, other third-world countries. Home Basic won't be coming to first-world countries.



    Think again.

    As manufactures trying to press prices to the lowest, the will put computers in shops with Home basic on it, or a lower version if it exists.

    Personally i think Vista was a big mistake all together, but a good learning tool for Microsoft to produce Windows 7.

    I am happy that it is on its way out.
    Thursday, July 16, 2009 10:48 AM
  • yeh but all the other versions are available with a pre order discount but not ultimate and thats the version I want as a user of vista ultimate want to use 7 ultimate, so I thought that we ultimate users deserve a pre order discount like everyone else
    P de Santos
    Thursday, July 16, 2009 12:49 PM
  • An pre-order-offer like it was send into the world by Microsoft (Windows 7 Home Premium for still expansive 49.99 hard Euros not weak Dollars), sold out within a day, is not an offer. That is just a show. A calculated propaganda gag, nothing else.
    Friday, July 17, 2009 9:16 PM
  • Does this mean getting a 49.99 pre-order can not be had anywhere now?  I tried to order two days later and nothing, even the first day on Office Depot site would not go thru.  I think for all the testing and feed back we've done, a little more than a half day notice would be nice!
    Monday, July 20, 2009 8:15 PM
  • MrGiggle -

    So it would seem.
    Tuesday, July 21, 2009 1:10 AM
  • they want to make as many editions as possible as a ladder type cost basis.  Like im using Windows 7.1 ultimate, and when i get my retail copy of windows home premium, i wont notice a differnce.
    Tuesday, July 21, 2009 5:27 PM
  • miller -

    Windows 7.1...? It's Windows 7 or Version 6.1...

    But you're right - unless you have a NEED for certain features - like connecting to a domain network, Bitlocker, or stuff available in Pro or Ultimate, you'll likely not notice much of any difference.
    Tuesday, July 21, 2009 7:53 PM
  • Hi all,
    I just have a question guys, sorry if i sound stupid but heres what i ask:
    Will windows 7 ultimate have all the current features to be more specific i wonder if it will have the GPO acceleratior included just like beta and RC1?
    thx in Advance
    best regards,
    RR
    Thursday, July 23, 2009 6:29 PM
  • kat -

    The RC is said to be feature complete. It was presented to us with the idea that the final product (the RTM build) would be pretty much identical to what we see in the RC. If the GPO accellerator was included in the RC, it should be in the RTM build.
    Thursday, July 23, 2009 11:35 PM
  • Hi Wolfie,
    yeah i expected that was a stupid question but just to make sure hehehe, thx man and cant wait till 22nd....and btw will the official version be released in all countries South America etc?
    thks again dude
    regards,
    RR
    Friday, July 24, 2009 1:02 AM
  • All these different versions are ridiculous.  You would think they would have learned from Vista that consumers don't need (and dare I say feel overwhelmed) when presented with half a dozen different flavors of Windows 7.  How about two?  Home and Business.  Get it right MS!  No one is going to waste their money on Ultimate.  Everyone who did that last time around with Vista has learned their lesson.  It was a complete joke with no features or extras that made the extra expense worth it.

    And the very least MS could do is offer the special upgrade price to users beta testing the RC.  Sure people could have got it a few weeks ago, but several missed the window of opportunity.
    • Proposed as answer by Target362 Monday, July 27, 2009 2:58 PM
    Monday, July 27, 2009 2:50 PM
  • All these different versions are ridiculous.  You would think they would have learned from Vista that consumers don't need (and dare I say feel overwhelmed) when presented with half a dozen different flavors of Windows 7.  How about two?  Home and Business.  Get it right MS!  No one is going to waste their money on Ultimate.  Everyone who did that last time around with Vista has learned their lesson.  It was a complete joke with no features or extras that made the extra expense worth it.

    And the very least MS could do is offer the special upgrade price to users beta testing the RC.  Sure people could have got it a few weeks ago, but several missed the window of opportunity.

    ____, didn't mean to make this an answer

    Guess what? I pre ordered ultimate, because I want everything.

    You are not the only one that uses windows kid, get over it. there are some who actully want to have everything.

    What we really need is one version with everything, and keep the price low and have a simple way disabling features we want and dont want

    be more open minded
    Monday, July 27, 2009 3:00 PM
  • Livefree -

    Who's being hammered with ALL these different editions?

    Those in the "developed world" - namely North America, parts of Asia and Europe are only going to ever see 3 of them on the shelf at the local computer superstore. Home Premium, Professional and Ultimate.

    Those in the developing world are only likely to see Starter and Home Basic.

    Enterprise and Ultimate are pretty much the same except for how they're licenced - Enteprise for volume licenses and Ultimate for single licenses. A guy wandering into a Best Buy or Fry's Electronics is NEVER going to see a retail package for Enterprise Edition.

    This is not that confusing. Try sorting out which one out of a few dozen Linux builds is best suited for you and then tell me about the confusion factor.

    All anyone would have to know is if they're going to use it in a home environment or if they need the advanced networking stuff to connect to a domain.

    As far as beta testers getting a special deal... I got an email with the offer on June 26th - the day the pre-order deal started. It was well publicized that the deal was from the 26th of June to July 11th or whlie supplies last.

    There's a saying - it's fairly harsh, but it's basically true - "You snooze, you lose..." We all got two whole weeks to make up our minds and buy a copy. Or not. There were still copies available on July 10th - I know - that's when I ordered mine.

    Monday, July 27, 2009 7:59 PM

  • As far as beta testers getting a special deal... I got an email with the offer on June 26th - the day the pre-order deal started.

    You snooze, you lose...




    That wasn't exactly an exclusive reward for beta-testers, was it.

    btw - this article about Vista beta-testers getting free copies isn't really true, is it?

    I wonder how these guys on the web can say that.  Free speech, I guess.


    Monday, July 27, 2009 11:06 PM
  • Today Microsoft PressPass spoke with Windows General Manager Mike Ybarra who revealed our SKU strategy for Windows 7. Click here to read the details.
    Windows Client IT Pro Audience Manager for Web Forums
    BIG mistake:

    removing virtual PC from Home versions.

    Home users have lots of software like games, or utilities that simply does not run on Windows 7. specially games, and those programs whose setup installers are coded in 16 bit (with 32 bit installed code), who can't run on 64 bit.

    lots of code do not run on windows 7 because of permissions restrictions.

    The only way to allow win 7 to run is with virtual windows XP. It is a wonderful idea, and removing it, is a really bad idea.

    Why remove it when there are free open source competition?
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 12:53 AM
  • Today Microsoft PressPass spoke with Windows General Manager Mike Ybarra who revealed our SKU strategy for Windows 7. Click here to read the details.
    Windows Client IT Pro Audience Manager for Web Forums
    Do Microsoft understand that people will be accostumed to a windows version on home/work, and then after switching, they will found that the other windows 7 does NOT works as the first windows 7?

    Apple propaganda will make a fest of it.
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 12:56 AM
  • Guillermo -

    Virtual PC was never available for home users. I believe you had to have XP Pro or Vista Business (or greater) to run it on previous versions.
    Running games on Virtual PC would suck hard boiled rotten eggs mainly because the hardware is all virtualized. Trying to install old games with XP Mode will not work very well either if the installer adds stuff to the registry. The installer WILL add stuff to the Windows registry - but it won't be the right one. It'll be the registry for Windows XP, not Win 7.

    Most any utility I've ever come across will either work with Win 7 or it won't. And if it won't directly work - there's a newer version of it out there that WILL work.

    So if old games are the only reason to have XP Mode or Virtual PC for a home user - and the experience isn't going to be worth the bother, then there isn't much point - is there?
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 6:02 AM
  • Do Microsoft understand that people will be accostumed to a windows version on home/work, and then after switching, they will found that the other windows 7 does NOT works as the first windows 7?

    Apple propaganda will make a fest of it.

    Guillermo -

    Exactly what do you mean Windows 7 won't work the same at home as it would at work?

    Outside of a few networking tweaks, XP Mode, Bitlocker and the edition name, Windows 7 Home Premium will work the same as Windows 7 Ultimate.
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 6:05 AM
  • That wasn't exactly an exclusive reward for beta-testers, was it.

    btw - this article about Vista beta-testers getting free copies isn't really true, is it?

    I wonder how these guys on the web can say that.  Free speech, I guess.



    egads -

    No.. It wasn't. Exactly how would you classify someone as being a beta tester anyhow? Someone who signed up to download (but never quite could finish downloading) the ISO? Someone who downloaded it, installed it, and immediately removed it because they didn't like it or there was some issue that popped up that they couldn't overcome? How would you classify the guy who got a copy from his buddy but never bothered signing up for the beta but has been testing it religously for the last 7 months? How about only those who posted something here in the last 7 months - even those who HATED it?

    The truth is - it's not exactly easy to say who qualifies and who doesn't... So I guess the only way to make it fair is to throw the thing open to EVERYONE...

    As far as those in the article... I have no clue nor inside information on what, if anything they're getting or not. But given they've been testing build 7600, already, they were likley the first to get their hands on it. I'll wager since the RC product keys stopped working, the expiration thing was also removed as well. In other words - they already HAVE the final build.

    And yes, it's a free speech thing. Just like Apple is free to say that the most fun you can have with Windows is playing with spreadsheets... Never mind the 900 pound gorilla sitting in the middle of the room known as PC gaming which rakes in BILLIONS of dollars each year. Doesn't make it true even if the repeat it thousands of times. But they are free to say it.
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 6:44 AM
  • Guillermo -

    Virtual PC was never available for home users. I believe you had to have XP Pro or Vista Business (or greater) to run it on previous versions.
    Running games on Virtual PC would suck hard boiled rotten eggs mainly because the hardware is all virtualized. Trying to install old games with XP Mode will not work very well either if the installer adds stuff to the registry. The installer WILL add stuff to the Windows registry - but it won't be the right one. It'll be the registry for Windows XP, not Win 7.

    Most any utility I've ever come across will either work with Win 7 or it won't. And if it won't directly work - there's a newer version of it out there that WILL work.

    So if old games are the only reason to have XP Mode or Virtual PC for a home user - and the experience isn't going to be worth the bother, then there isn't much point - is there?

    [Virtual PC was never available for home users. I believe you had to have XP Pro or Vista Business (or greater) to run it on previous versions.]
    GNU virtual machines are freely available. What is the point to make Virtual PC free to ones, and blocked to others? free food for apple marketing?

    [Running games on Virtual PC would suck hard boiled rotten eggs mainly because the hardware is all virtualized]
    Games like Monkey Island don't need hardware acceleration. And I know fathers who want to share the experience they enjoyed with his children.
    I have a niece who I want to give an old platform game "titus the fox", that I played 15 years ago. ¿she need windows enterprise ultimate?
    Families still have lot of software wich they buyed, not only games, and don't work with Vista/win 7. Not even in compatibility mode.

    [Most any utility I've ever come across will either work with Win 7 or it won't. And if it won't directly work - there's a newer version of it out there that WILL work.]
    Bad reasoning. If you have 10 programs wich don't work on windows 7, you do NOT want to buy all of them again. You are adding 1000$ to the cost of Windows 7, just for it to do the same XP does today.
    See, at my work, I convinced 3 buddies to test windows 7. They removed it, and returned back to XP. And gess what? they had an awful experience with notebooks bundled with vista (also downgraded to XP), and just see win 7 as another vista. Any software wich does not work just confirm his misstrust.

    two of them removed it because it failed to run the software. the only way to go was Virtual XP (wich I failed to install on any win7 32 bit RC, for some strange reason).
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 2:48 PM
  • Do Microsoft understand that people will be accostumed to a windows version on home/work, and then after switching, they will found that the other windows 7 does NOT works as the first windows 7?

    Apple propaganda will make a fest of it.

    Guillermo -

    Exactly what do you mean Windows 7 won't work the same at home as it would at work?

    Outside of a few networking tweaks, XP Mode, Bitlocker and the edition name, Windows 7 Home Premium will work the same as Windows 7 Ultimate.
    That is absolutely false.
    There are lots of downloadable software from Microsoft, that only works if you payed the more expensive version on windows 7.
    The point is that is misleading to tell to the consumer that the things you mention are the only differences between those windows versions, because after the fact, they get a lot of nasties surprises, as was in vista:

    -No, you cannot downgrade to Xp unless you upgrade to ultimate.
    -No you cannot see multimedia at work, as in your home, because you have "Business" at work and Home at home.
    -No you cannot install virtual XP in your home, to run the same software than at work.
    -No you cannot use the same network solution you learned at work in your home because...
    -Há, you encrypted your portable disk at work? Next time buy Apple, as the propaganda tells you meanwhile you are angry at Microsoft.
    -Your crappy development country version of windows 6.1 does not do the same things that the pirated Windows 7 Ultimate? Feel like a stupid for saving 6 months of food to pay for a legal copy of windows ____ edition.

    List is laaarge

    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 3:02 PM
  • That wasn't exactly an exclusive reward for beta-testers, was it.

    btw - this article about Vista beta-testers getting free copies isn't really true, is it?

    I wonder how these guys on the web can say that.  Free speech, I guess.



    egads -

    No.. It wasn't. Exactly how would you classify someone as being a beta tester anyhow? Someone who signed up to download (but never quite could finish downloading) the ISO? Someone who downloaded it, installed it, and immediately removed it because they didn't like it or there was some issue that popped up that they couldn't overcome? How would you classify the guy who got a copy from his buddy but never bothered signing up for the beta but has been testing it religously for the last 7 months? How about only those who posted something here in the last 7 months - even those who HATED it?

    The truth is - it's not exactly easy to say who qualifies and who doesn't... So I guess the only way to make it fair is to throw the thing open to EVERYONE...

    As far as those in the article... I have no clue nor inside information on what, if anything they're getting or not. But given they've been testing build 7600, already, they were likley the first to get their hands on it. I'll wager since the RC product keys stopped working, the expiration thing was also removed as well. In other words - they already HAVE the final build.

    And yes, it's a free speech thing. Just like Apple is free to say that the most fun you can have with Windows is playing with spreadsheets... Never mind the 900 pound gorilla sitting in the middle of the room known as PC gaming which rakes in BILLIONS of dollars each year. Doesn't make it true even if the repeat it thousands of times. But they are free to say it.

    At least can release Windows 7 RC build 7600 to be activated with the same key that build 7100.

    What is the point to report a bug wich was fixed in the 7600 build?
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 3:05 PM

  • [Virtual PC was never available for home users. I believe you had to have XP Pro or Vista Business (or greater) to run it on previous versions.]
    GNU virtual machines are freely available. What is the point to make Virtual PC free to ones, and blocked to others? free food for apple marketing?

    [Running games on Virtual PC would suck hard boiled rotten eggs mainly because the hardware is all virtualized]
    Games like Monkey Island don't need hardware acceleration. And I know fathers who want to share the experience they enjoyed with his children.
    I have a niece who I want to give an old platform game "titus the fox", that I played 15 years ago. ¿she need windows enterprise ultimate?
    Families still have lot of software wich they buyed, not only games, and don't work with Vista/win 7. Not even in compatibility mode.

    [Most any utility I've ever come across will either work with Win 7 or it won't. And if it won't directly work - there's a newer version of it out there that WILL work.]
    Bad reasoning. If you have 10 programs wich don't work on windows 7, you do NOT want to buy all of them again. You are adding 1000$ to the cost of Windows 7, just for it to do the same XP does today.
    See, at my work, I convinced 3 buddies to test windows 7. They removed it, and returned back to XP. And gess what? they had an awful experience with notebooks bundled with vista (also downgraded to XP), and just see win 7 as another vista. Any software wich does not work just confirm his misstrust.

    two of them removed it because it failed to run the software. the only way to go was Virtual XP (wich I failed to install on any win7 32 bit RC, for some strange reason).

    So far my windows 7 RC runs just fine. I never installed any driver on my vista bundled laptop, and guess what? All i trew at it worked, so far.
    Old games, new ones, old and new software, there all running. Though just a few had some strange behavior, but the still worked.
    Having vista installed a few thousand times, i was never a fan of vista, ever. It was the first thing i did when i received my laptop, remove it.
    Now i am working with windows 7 from the day it was there, you can not compaire it with vista at all.
    Its stable, the number of times i had to force it down i can count on one hand.
    One thing i can asure you, its stil very much prone to viruses. :(

    Do your buddies know what the are doing?
    Do the know you have to run older software as an administrator? If not, then yes you have problems.

    Perhaps its hardware related? I mean anything is possible and i have seen crazy things. My laptop was made for vista, but it runs about a 1000% better on win7, way much faster as well.
    I did not try win7 on my other computers.
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 7:57 PM