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Where did the Shortcuts go from My Network Places?

    Question

  • In my Domain running Windows XP we RELY heaving on My Network Places Network Shortcuts. That is how users access all their shared folders without having to map drives. I use it about 100x a day as a Network Administrator.

    We have just been looking and Vista and it seems to have removed yet another piece of functionality that was great with XP. I thought Windows 7 would be better but no such luck.

    In the users profile for Vista there IS a folder called Network Shortcuts and is located in C:\Users\%username%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Network Shortcuts

    However these shortcuts no longer appear in Network and I can't seem to find out how to use them?

    Please help me with this. This is a huge problem with my users along with all the other huge profile issues that Vista has created. I have no idea why Microsoft would take something great (Profile structure in XP) and make it so convuluted as to be ridiculously unfriendly in a domain environment (Vista and Windows 7)
    lforbes
    Thursday, May 14, 2009 11:05 PM

Answers

  • You can also create shortcuts to Internet locations, such as websites or FTP sites. Here’s how to do that:

    1.

    Open Computer by clicking the Start button, and then clicking Computer.

    2.

    Right-click anywhere in the folder, and then click Add a Network Location.

    3.

    Follow the steps in the wizard to add a shortcut to a location on your network, a website, or an FTP site.


    * Note
    Network locations replaces Network Places in this version of Windows.
    • Marked as answer by lforbes Thursday, November 08, 2012 7:28 PM
    Tuesday, June 30, 2009 6:44 PM
  • I have 3000 computers on my Domain network so browsing the network is not feasible. In fact I DON'T want my users to see the Network Computers and I could hide that with XP too.

    I want them only to see the folders they have access too.

    I am a Domain Admin looking for answers as to why the Network Shortcuts was removed.

    Network Shortcuts was a really cool feature available with Windows XP and Windows 2000 that they have removed with Vista and Windows 7.

    Again an instance of "dumbed down" functionality with the switch to Vista/7.

    I don't use Mapped network Drives in my network. I have 3000 users and mapping drives is really archaic and difficult to manage.  You are also limited by the 26 drive letters as well as thumb drives, memory card slots etc.

    My solution to this is

    1> Create the shortcuts on Windows XP.
    2> Copy the network shortcuts to a folder on the desktop (inside mandatory profile) called "My Network Places"
    3> Change the icon on the folder to match the Windows XP icon for My Network Places.

    Unfortunately the "dynamic" feature of this is gone with XP so shortcuts will have to be added manually again.
    lforbes
    • Marked as answer by lforbes Tuesday, May 26, 2009 5:01 AM
    Tuesday, May 26, 2009 5:01 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

     

    Thank you for posting.

     

    Based on my research, I would like to suggest the following:

     

    1.    View the computers and devices on the network

     

    1)    Click Start and then click Network to view the computers and devices on the network.

    Note: If the Network link don’t exist. You can right-click on Start button, select Properties, go to Start Menu tab, click Customize and check the item “Network”.

     

    2)    You can also go to “Control Panel\Network and Sharing Center” and click “View computers and devices” in the left Pane to access them.

     

    2.    If you want to access some share folders directly, you may need to map a network drive referring to the following document:

     

    Create a shortcut to (map) a network drive

    http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/Windows/en-US/help/909d569b-ed98-4176-9f7c-6eed5201ba441033.mspx

     

    Hope this helps. Thanks.


    Nicholas Li - MSFT
    Tuesday, May 19, 2009 10:33 AM
    Moderator
  • I have 3000 computers on my Domain network so browsing the network is not feasible. In fact I DON'T want my users to see the Network Computers and I could hide that with XP too.

    I want them only to see the folders they have access too.

    I am a Domain Admin looking for answers as to why the Network Shortcuts was removed.

    Network Shortcuts was a really cool feature available with Windows XP and Windows 2000 that they have removed with Vista and Windows 7.

    Again an instance of "dumbed down" functionality with the switch to Vista/7.

    I don't use Mapped network Drives in my network. I have 3000 users and mapping drives is really archaic and difficult to manage.  You are also limited by the 26 drive letters as well as thumb drives, memory card slots etc.

    My solution to this is

    1> Create the shortcuts on Windows XP.
    2> Copy the network shortcuts to a folder on the desktop (inside mandatory profile) called "My Network Places"
    3> Change the icon on the folder to match the Windows XP icon for My Network Places.

    Unfortunately the "dynamic" feature of this is gone with XP so shortcuts will have to be added manually again.
    lforbes
    • Marked as answer by lforbes Tuesday, May 26, 2009 5:01 AM
    Tuesday, May 26, 2009 5:01 AM
  • You can also create shortcuts to Internet locations, such as websites or FTP sites. Here’s how to do that:

    1.

    Open Computer by clicking the Start button, and then clicking Computer.

    2.

    Right-click anywhere in the folder, and then click Add a Network Location.

    3.

    Follow the steps in the wizard to add a shortcut to a location on your network, a website, or an FTP site.


    * Note
    Network locations replaces Network Places in this version of Windows.
    • Marked as answer by lforbes Thursday, November 08, 2012 7:28 PM
    Tuesday, June 30, 2009 6:44 PM
  • I just did that for some network folders and I'm quite pleased with the results.

    Can we look forward to Microsoft putting "Add Network Location" on the pop-up menu for network folders etc?  Maybe they could use it to replace "Map Network Drive" which is archaic.
    Thursday, November 19, 2009 2:04 PM