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Windows 8 Setup is "messed up"

    Question

  • Hi,

    I really wanted to install Windows 8 (64-bit) after having it tested in a virtual environment.
    But something weird is going on.
    During the intial installation process, the screen is "messed up". Whenever I move the mouse, it leaves "traces" and makes the display all weird.

    It was really hard going through the installation process but once completed, Windows 8 refused to boot. Anyone knows why?

    My computer is not that old and I've looked into the minimum requirements. I don't see anything that might cause trouble. Any ideas?

    Specs:
    Processor AMD Athlon(tm) 64 X2 Dual Core Processor 5200+, 2600 Mhz, 2 Core(s), 2 Logical Processor(s)
    BIOS Version/Date Phoenix Technologies, LTD M2N-TVM 0203, 21/09/2006
    Display NVIDIA GeForce 7300 SE/7200 GS
    4GB of RAM
    1TB HDD

    I've also used coreinfo to see if my processor supports PAE, NX and SSE2. And it does.

    Thanks!



    • Edited by DanielA173 Friday, October 26, 2012 5:10 AM
    Friday, October 26, 2012 5:07 AM

Answers

  • Good on you for deciding to upgrade your Graphics card and thanks for the recommendation.
    I, however, cannot afford to upgrade. As I've said, my current graphics card has a legacy S-video output which connects to my standard TV.
    If I were to purchase a new graphics card, it will most likely to have an HDMI output. Which means I'll have to get an adapter and it's just not worth it.

    But... I've decided to "cave in" a little and installed the x86 edition of Windows 8 Pro. Everything is working quite well.
    I realize I won't be able to utilize all of my RAM (which is a total of 4GB), but I'll manage. Same goes for the other benefits that x64 provides.
    And anyway, I don't think I'll ever reach that level of usage as a basic user.

    So if you don't feel like upgrading, and you're okay with the fact of not utilizing all of your RAM (Unless you're with PAE), simply install the x86 version.

    Enjoy and thanks.



    • Marked as answer by DanielA173 Saturday, October 27, 2012 10:52 PM
    • Edited by DanielA173 Saturday, October 27, 2012 11:06 PM
    Saturday, October 27, 2012 10:52 PM

All replies

  • Hi, you are not alone.  I am using an AMD Quad Core, however, GeForce 440 PCI Express card with Gigabyte motherboard and I get the corrpution you mention above.

    IF I switch to the native on board graphics it's fine, and I think that's a 7300 onboard card.

    Using the PCI Express card it eventually just gives up and stops broadcasting to the graphics card (well, monitor goes dead with loss of signal).

    (Side note, reinstalled, or started to, Windows 7 from scratch, no issues at all with that thinking it was a hardware failure)

    Thanks.



    • Edited by Innovatao Friday, October 26, 2012 7:53 AM Reformatting of response.
    Friday, October 26, 2012 7:36 AM
  • Thank you for taking the time to reply.

    I wish I could say I'm "glad" I'm not the only one who's experiencing these issues, but is there any way to fix this?

    I had to re-install Windows 7.

     I ran Windows 8 installation disc into another computer (Intel-based one) and it runs perfectly.
    Friday, October 26, 2012 10:53 AM
  • Damn, looks like it's a NVidia graphics card incompatibility issue.

    The card I have, a 4xx series apparantely wasn't supported in the beta of Win 8, and even though the documentation says it is, looks like it isn't.   

    Found a similar thread where people have put together the info.  Answer: Upgrade :( On the plus side, graphics card upgrade time :)

    Can't put a link in as haven't verified my mail address yet,

    But put the below into google and found something on a site called Toms Hardware.

    windows 8 install issue corrupt graphics

    • Proposed as answer by Innovatao Friday, October 26, 2012 3:42 PM
    Friday, October 26, 2012 11:35 AM
  • Oh, that's too bad! :\

    I've checked Nvidia's list as well and it's said to be supported. Yours too, by the way.

    http://www.nvidia.com/object/windows-8-solutions.html

    Unfortunately, I can't really upgrade my graphics card because I still use a legacy S-Video connector to my TV. I rarely use it, but still.

    Thank you for providing this information, though!

    (By the way, you can put a link, but hit "Remove hyperlink" before posting.)

    Here's another related-tpoic:
    http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_cp-hardware/windows-8-release-preview-wont-install-with-an/78798f8e-5cfd-48d6-bdd1-879248451d56

    • Edited by DanielA173 Friday, October 26, 2012 3:17 PM
    Friday, October 26, 2012 12:36 PM
  • Count me as another with this problem, and after seeing this thread I think it must just be time for a Graphics card upgrade. The this problem occurred both with the Download and Disc while BOTH worked fine on my personal High end desktop (disc) and laptop (download). 

    My relative wasnt too happy about ending up having to spend more money for Windows 8 but I just told them their card was too old and needs to get updated. I suspected it was the card, though I dont understand why, as other people noticed, it works great on Windows 7 but whatever, the 7300 is ancient, i guess it was time.

    If anyone is on the fence about a card to buy I'd recommend this one, its cheap and manages to have 1 gig of video memory and a HDMI port, which is nice for Windows 8 Media Center. I dedicated my HDTV to be a Media Center monitor only and it works great.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0049MPQA4/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_2?ie=UTF8&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER


    • Edited by LordRikerQ Saturday, October 27, 2012 4:13 PM
    Saturday, October 27, 2012 4:11 PM
  • Good on you for deciding to upgrade your Graphics card and thanks for the recommendation.
    I, however, cannot afford to upgrade. As I've said, my current graphics card has a legacy S-video output which connects to my standard TV.
    If I were to purchase a new graphics card, it will most likely to have an HDMI output. Which means I'll have to get an adapter and it's just not worth it.

    But... I've decided to "cave in" a little and installed the x86 edition of Windows 8 Pro. Everything is working quite well.
    I realize I won't be able to utilize all of my RAM (which is a total of 4GB), but I'll manage. Same goes for the other benefits that x64 provides.
    And anyway, I don't think I'll ever reach that level of usage as a basic user.

    So if you don't feel like upgrading, and you're okay with the fact of not utilizing all of your RAM (Unless you're with PAE), simply install the x86 version.

    Enjoy and thanks.



    • Marked as answer by DanielA173 Saturday, October 27, 2012 10:52 PM
    • Edited by DanielA173 Saturday, October 27, 2012 11:06 PM
    Saturday, October 27, 2012 10:52 PM
  • If you have 4 GB of RAM, the 32-bit version is perfectly fine. The 32-bit addressing provides a 32-bit number for each byte of data. In other words, the address space allows to uniquely address 2^32 bytes, which is 4,294,967,296 bytes, or 4GB. It is when you have more than 4GB, you need a 64-bit addressing or an address translation technology, such as PAE.

    I've heard of the misconception that 32-bit Windows can only address 3.75 GB of RAM, but I don't know where this comes from.


    Andy

    Saturday, October 27, 2012 11:23 PM
  • Thanks Andy! Apparently the owner of the PC decided they'd rather have a 32 bit version and loose files rather then upgrade. Oh well, its not my PC, but thanks for giving us the option. 

    I popped in the 32 bit disc and no distortions or glitching out at all, everything is going smoothly with the install.

    Sunday, October 28, 2012 2:30 AM
  • Thanks Andy.

    I always thought 32-bit systems could only max around 3.75GB of RAM. It usually says so in the computer's properties but this could also mean it's shared memory, if I'm not mistaken.

    Thanks again.


    • Edited by DanielA173 Sunday, October 28, 2012 7:44 AM
    Sunday, October 28, 2012 7:44 AM
  • It's likely that the remaining 0.25 GB (256 MB) is reserved by the integrated video controller. Many integrated video controllers don't have their own memory, so they have to use system RAM. In this case, the OS cannot address this memory, and marks is as not available.

    There is a sysinternals tool called RAMMap, that can show you how exactly the system memory is used: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/ff700229.aspx


    Andy

    Tuesday, October 30, 2012 1:52 AM