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Why Windows 7 64-bit requires twice as much RAM as the 32-bit version?

Answers

All replies

  • Hi,
    Beside the structure and binaries that require a lot of resources,not at last all versions of 64-bit are designed mostly for bussiness BUT afterwards the computer is a mathematic stuff and 32+32=64-bit

    Friday, August 28, 2009 7:38 PM
  • Hi,
    Beside the structure and binaries that require a lot of resources,not at last all versions of 64-bit are designed mostly for bussiness BUT afterwards the computer is a mathematic stuff and 32+32=64-bit


    32-bit-1GB RAM+32-bit-1GB RAM=64-bit-2GB RAM
    Friday, August 28, 2009 7:39 PM
  • Hi,

    64-bit Operating System manipulates memory in QWORDS instead of DWORDS in 32-bit Operating System. For more information on why 64-bit Operating System consumes more memory, I would like to share the following articles on 64-bit with you.

    32bit VS 64bit
    http://blogs.msdn.com/maoni/archive/2007/05/15/64-bit-vs-32-bit.aspx

    64-bit
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/64-bit

    Note: we provide this link for references, Microsoft doesn't control and guarantee the security in this website.

    Best Regards.
    Dale Qiao
    Thursday, September 03, 2009 1:34 AM
  • Some of you are giving people the impression that the 64 bit version of the operating system chews up twice as much memory to do the same things as the 32 bit version simply because everything takes twice as many bits.

    Wow.

    This is simply NOT true!  It's a TREMENDOUSLY oversimplified thing to tell people!

    64 bit windows often uses nearly the same amount of memory as the 32 bit version for many things, though pointers to things must be 8 bytes instead of 4, and in general the operating system is optimized to do bigger things without worrying about memory address limitations.  Given that the x64 instruction set is in some ways more efficient, executable code often takes almost the SAME amount of space.

    Do you know that an int (integer) in the 64 bit environment is still only 32 bits wide?  Pointers and sizes of things in memory (e.g., size_t) have been increased to 64 bits to accomodate a hugely expanded address space.

    I'm building an appilcation right now...  The 32 bit version of the DLL takes 386 KB on disk.  The 64 bit version takes only 14 KB more = 400 KB!  There is no doubling here.

    The short answer to the original poster's question is that the x64 operating system is targeted and optimized to support BIG operations - e.g., on computers with BIG memory in excess of 4 GB, and has thus been given a larger minimum RAM requirement.  This is speculation, but I'm betting the 2 GB minimum was a Marketing decision within Microsoft as much as an Engineering one.

    -Noel
    Thursday, September 03, 2009 6:18 AM
  • Some of you are giving people the impression that the 64 bit version of the operating system chews up twice as much memory to do the same things as the 32 bit version simply because everything takes twice as many bits.

    Wow.

    This is simply NOT true!  It's a TREMENDOUSLY oversimplified thing to tell people!

    64 bit windows often uses nearly the same amount of memory as the 32 bit version for many things, though pointers to things must be 8 bytes instead of 4, and in general the operating system is optimized to do bigger things without worrying about memory address limitations.  Given that the x64 instruction set is in some ways more efficient, executable code often takes almost the SAME amount of space.

    Do you know that an int (integer) in the 64 bit environment is still only 32 bits wide?  Pointers and sizes of things in memory (e.g., size_t) have been increased to 64 bits to accomodate a hugely expanded address space.

    I'm building an appilcation right now...  The 32 bit version of the DLL takes 386 KB on disk.  The 64 bit version takes only 14 KB more = 400 KB!  There is no doubling here.

    The short answer to the original poster's question is that the x64 operating system is targeted and optimized to support BIG operations - e.g., on computers with BIG memory in excess of 4 GB, and has thus been given a larger minimum RAM requirement.  This is speculation, but I'm betting the 2 GB minimum was a Marketing decision within Microsoft as much as an Engineering one.

    -Noel

    Hi,
    Like most comp users probably know Windows Xp Profesional Edition 64bit was the first version of a 64 bit OS and was meant as a replacement for Windows 2000 Professional-mostly used in businesses purposes only. Any other version of 64 bit OS didn't and won't change much "the addressed to...mainly" purposes were or will be designed for.But as there is a free market....
    As I belive even the formatting type during the installation is different than 32bit version and not to be ignored that there are architectures x64 and x86 which obivously increases the RAM requirements if not installed on a platform designed for, randomly if the processor "is not available" RAM sometime can be an alternative for OS requirements of an optimised environment and smoothly run and not at last "to MAKE the DIFFERENCE" even if that means...DOUBLING.
    Thursday, September 03, 2009 7:12 AM
  • Some of you are giving people the impression that the 64 bit version of the operating system chews up twice as much memory to do the same things as the 32 bit version simply because everything takes twice as many bits.

    Wow.

    This is simply NOT true!  It's a TREMENDOUSLY oversimplified thing to tell people!

    64 bit windows often uses nearly the same amount of memory as the 32 bit version for many things, though pointers to things must be 8 bytes instead of 4, and in general the operating system is optimized to do bigger things without worrying about memory address limitations.  Given that the x64 instruction set is in some ways more efficient, executable code often takes almost the SAME amount of space.

    Do you know that an int (integer) in the 64 bit environment is still only 32 bits wide?  Pointers and sizes of things in memory (e.g., size_t) have been increased to 64 bits to accomodate a hugely expanded address space.

    I'm building an appilcation right now...  The 32 bit version of the DLL takes 386 KB on disk.  The 64 bit version takes only 14 KB more = 400 KB!  There is no doubling here.

    The short answer to the original poster's question is that the x64 operating system is targeted and optimized to support BIG operations - e.g., on computers with BIG memory in excess of 4 GB, and has thus been given a larger minimum RAM requirement.  This is speculation, but I'm betting the 2 GB minimum was a Marketing decision within Microsoft as much as an Engineering one.

    -Noel

    Hi,
    Like most comp users probably know Windows Xp Profesional Edition 64bit was the first version of a 64 bit OS and was meant as a replacement for Windows 2000 Professional-mostly used in businesses purposes only. Any other version of 64 bit OS didn't and won't change much "the addressed to...mainly" purposes were or will be designed for.But as there is a free market....
    As I belive even the formatting type during the installation is different than 32bit version and not to be ignored that there are architectures x64 and x86 which obivously increases the RAM requirements if not installed on a platform designed for, randomly if the processor "is not available" RAM sometime can be an alternative for OS requirements of an optimised environment and smoothly run and not at last "to MAKE the DIFFERENCE" even if that means...DOUBLING.

    Or better and simplier said have to make a "noticed" difference between 64bit and 32bit, a "14KB more" is only an add to the services run on 64bit version and not available on 32bit which can also get a start only on x64 environment and not at last the larger information processed on x64 architecture (in miliseconds) is almost double and RAM is required again.  
    • Proposed as answer by cobalt817 Monday, June 07, 2010 7:43 AM
    Thursday, September 03, 2009 8:08 AM
  • 64 bit OS can address more RAM, but does not always use more. Since it is a 64 bit OS, is must be able to run 64 bit apps, and those will use more RAM.

    Most of us don't even have one 64 bit application other than what is in the OS.

    Monday, June 07, 2010 7:49 AM
  • ALL THIS IS RUBBISH! im using windows7 pro x64 now with 1gb of ddr2 no problems.
    Wednesday, July 06, 2011 12:30 AM
  • Not quite all of it.  I said essentially the same thing as you.  :)

    -Noel

    Wednesday, July 06, 2011 5:11 AM
  • Since 32 bit can't use 4 gigs of ram, most new consumer computers come with win 7 64 bit.  It's a consumer os.

     

    Wednesday, July 06, 2011 3:44 PM