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Windows 8 Partitions

    Question

  • 1. Why I cannot choose partition to install Windows 8 when running install from onother system (e.g. Win7) ? On earlier systems this option preserves disk drive letter assignements. I want to have Win8 installed on drive P:, but when running setup from bootable CD, system partition changes to C:

    2. I succesfully installed Win8 32 on partition 11 on my disk, but Win8 64 doesn't want to install on partition 12. Why ?

    Monday, March 12, 2012 7:43 AM

All replies

  • Partition 11? You may want to checkout virtualization.  With that many partition, you are tying to install Win8 on an extended partition--bad idea.  The boot files (the system partition) must be a primary partition--it cannot be an extended partition.

    Really, with that many partitions you may want to rethink your layout.

    • Marked as answer by Niki HanModerator Wednesday, March 28, 2012 6:19 AM
    • Unmarked as answer by Kaaz Wednesday, March 28, 2012 8:26 AM
    Wednesday, March 14, 2012 4:13 AM
  • Why bad idea ? I planned partition layout with care, and want to have Windows 8 32 on partiton 11 and Windows 8 64 on partition 12. Is it forbidden ? Microsoft wants to plan my partition layout ?

    The previous versions of Windows: XP, Vista, 7, Windows Server 2003 and 2008 peacefully coexist on partitions 1-10. Don't worry, there are legal. I'm a developer and have computer for testing programs on different systems. And I clearly see that every new version of Windows is worse than the predecestor. And slower. They are running on identical hardware so I can compare them.

    Linux systems succesfully install until partition 15. Maybe someone tell me why Windows 8 cannot ?


    Kaaz

    Wednesday, March 28, 2012 8:00 AM
  • For testing and coding, install Win8 into a VHD and add it to to the bootmanager. So you no longer have to deal with partitions:

    How To Guide to Installing and Booting Windows 8 Consumer Preview off a VHD (Virtual Hard Disk)


    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code"

    Wednesday, March 28, 2012 12:18 PM
  • I want to have real system on real harddisk. Tests on virtual environment are not reliable. I want to test the programs on real system, not to test the VHD. What about RAID ? I also have some virtual PC Windows installs, and I see that they sometimes behave different than the real systems.

    Another question arise: If Win8 32 was able to install on partition 11, then Win8 64 would install on partition 11 or only on partition 1 ?

    What is the problem with partitions in Win8 ? Every older version of Windows does not care on whitch partition they run, and what disk letter do they have. I have Windows installed on C:, D: ..., and even on U: and V:

    I suppose current Microsoft programmers can get the code from their older collegues and implement this simple thing.


    Kaaz

    Wednesday, March 28, 2012 1:04 PM
  • I want to have real system on real harddisk. I want to test the programs on real system, not to test the VHD.

    read the link before posting such things ;) Booting from VHD has NOTHING to to with a VM :P

    It's a normal native booted Windows but data are not stored on a new partition, they are stored in the VHD. So you can have a folder on your Host-PC with several VHDs with different Windows versions (Win7, Server 2008 R2, Windows 8 (server))


    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code"

    Wednesday, March 28, 2012 6:06 PM
  • I read the link. It's written "What this means is that ONLY the Hard Drive will be virtualized".

    It just mean that some of the system is virtualized. It is not the same as real system. It is slower.

    You try to explain how to drive the Microsoft new car that has three wheels.

    I am asking why Microsoft new car have only three wheels, while all previous models had four wheels. Moreover all other manufactures cars have also four wheels.


    Kaaz

    Wednesday, March 28, 2012 8:53 PM
  • It is not the same as real system. It is slower.

    *facepalm*

    Native VHD Support in Windows 7


    Native VHD Boot

    Native VHD boot means that the Windows image in a VHD file can boot on a physical machine without starting a Hyper-V virtual machine. VHD image files make it easy for a single physical machine to have multiple instances of the operating system available to boot at any time.   Multiple boot support has been available in Windows for many releases, but required a separate disk partition for each installed operating system. 

    Developers and testers can use native VHD boot to run test versions of new device drivers or other software for Windows with full access to the hardware devices connected to the system.

    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code"

    Wednesday, March 28, 2012 9:18 PM
  • Interesting article.

    "Lower write throughput to dynamic VHDs is due to multiple I/Os required to expand the file as new blocks are written to the virtual disk."

    I remind my questions from the first post:

    1. Why I cannot choose partition to install Windows 8 when running install from onother system (e.g. Win7) ?

    2. I succesfully installed Win8 32 on partition 11 on my disk, but Win8 64 doesn't want to install on partition 12. Why ?

    Can you answer these questions or not ? If not, maybe someone else knows the aswer.


    Kaaz

    Wednesday, March 28, 2012 9:53 PM
  • which error message do you get? Again, install win8 to a VHD and don't waste hours with partition hassle.

    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code"

    Thursday, March 29, 2012 1:44 PM
  • Andre,

    You wrote that installing Windows on a partition is a hours hassle for you and still you want to help. Very brave of you. Maybe you should first do at least one Windows install by yourself, to be familiar with the topic. Start with installing Vista on partition 1, and next install Win7 on partition 2. If you won't find the instructions in the web, I can help.

    I assure you that installing Windows on partition 1 or 2 or 11 is a peace of cake for millions of users. The only difference with larger partition numbers is that you must scroll down to see the place you have to click. I advise using the weel on your mouse.

    And please do not start another debate about what is better - the mouse or the touchpad. I know that you are big VHD fan, and I respect that. But that is no reason for us to waste hours disputing the prons and cons of VHD's and partitions. There are some "Advocacy" groups where you can express yourself. Good bye for now.

    This is Microsoft forum and I expect some competent people from Microsoft tell me why very helpful functionality of Windows, used by millions of customers for 17 years, has gone in the newest version of Windows.

    Any volunteers ?


    Kaaz

    Thursday, March 29, 2012 9:38 PM
  • Kaaz -

    No disrespect intended - but I'm kinda curious as to why you don't simply get a number of cheap 80 - 100 GB HDDs and swap them via the BIOS (or by way of an external bay - whichever is easier). Just install one OS per hard drive  Most modern motherboard BIOS support changing the default boot device in one way shape or form. Some rotate the drive list and the top one boots while others allow you to pick and choose boot order. Been using this technique since the Vista Beta and it's worked spectacularly well. It adds maybe 20 seconds to a boot cycle when switching drives/OSs. I currently have 5 drives mounted, 1 has Vista, 1 has 7, 1 has 8 and two others are for general storage and are shared between the 3 OS's.. I generally keep the two data only drives as the same drive letters regardless of the OS. The 20 GB storage drive is always drive E: and the bigger one is always drive L:

    For your situation where you've got at least a dozen OS's - why not get an external bay - eSATA style - the variety where you simply plug the drive into the bay and boot. Newegg sells these drive units for about $30 USD. Just tell the BIOS to boot to the appropriate drive. At this point, all you need are perhaps 2 drives (or partitions) - one for whatever your favorite OS of choice happens to be at the moment and one for the data you want to test.

    Friday, March 30, 2012 3:55 AM
  • Interesting point. I could buy 12 disks for 12 systems. Or I could buy 12 test computers. Or I could buy Microsoft and order the employes to repair Windows 8.

    But I prefere to have 12 partitions on 1 disk in 1 computer. Looks strange ?


    Kaaz

    Friday, March 30, 2012 8:17 AM