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Windows 7 downgrade ultimate to Home Premium

    Question

  • I recently had a harddisk failure on my main computer and purchased a new harddrive and installed a legal copy of Windows 7 Ultimate that was on a second computer that I rarely used.  I have a copy of Windows7 Home Premium that I want to install on the second computer, my question is can I put in the product key for the Home Premium or do I have to do a complete re-install?
    Saturday, December 11, 2010 3:45 AM

Answers

  • I recently had a harddisk failure on my main computer and purchased a new harddrive and installed a legal copy of Windows 7 Ultimate that was on a second computer that I rarely used.  I have a copy of Windows7 Home Premium that I want to install on the second computer, my question is can I put in the product key for the Home Premium or do I have to do a complete re-install?

          You would have to perform a "clean install" of Windows 7 Home Premium using a genuine Windows 7 Home Premium installation DVD.
    Carey Frisch
    Saturday, December 11, 2010 9:42 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • You have to do a re-install, by a simple reason: By entering a key from another Windows edition, you may be able* to upgrade the current installation (the key unlocks features already present on your harddrive). But a key can't lock or delete already enabled features, so a downgrade can only be done by a (clean) installation of the lower edition.

    * (assumed, some other conditions are met, too, esp. when the "channels" are different, OEM versions vs. Retail keys, Retail versions vs. OEM keys - that's an own science)


    "192 GB ought to be enough for anybody." (from the miniseries "Next Generation's Jokes")
    Saturday, December 11, 2010 2:03 PM
  • I have not seen a UNinstall option, this is what I want to do without losing any pictures videos etc currently on that drive, I can do a backup then format and re-install porgrams etc. but I was looking for a simpiler solution.


    A. John Plaisier
    Saturday, December 11, 2010 7:44 PM
  • use this tool:

    http://mp7000.deviantart.com/art/Windows-7-Enterprise-Downgrade-159805048

    Start the Program and select the Version you wand to Downgrade. Then insert you Install Disk you buy and click Install. Then select Upgrade and Windows will downgrade your Windows Enterprise Edition.


    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code" CLIP- Stellvertreter http://www.winvistaside.de/
    Saturday, December 11, 2010 7:53 PM
  • use this tool:

    http://mp7000.deviantart.com/art/Windows-7-Enterprise-Downgrade-159805048

    Start the Program and select the Version you wand to Downgrade. Then insert you Install Disk you buy and click Install. Then select Upgrade and Windows will downgrade your Windows Enterprise Edition.


    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code" CLIP- Stellvertreter http://www.winvistaside.de/


    I assume all that tool does is the same as manually editing the following? (used {} tags to specify the value's of the keys)

    [HKLM\Software\Microsot\Windows NT\CurrentVersion]
    EditionID {Ultimate} > {HOMEPREMIUM}
    ProductName {Windows 7 Ultimate} > {Windows 7 HOMEPREMIUM}

    I don't know the tool you linked too, never had to use this technique to be honest, just know you can fool the Windows 7 Setup check for what version of windows is installed in that way.

    Either way, there is no supported method for this from Microsoft. However by using the software Andre posted you can probably do it eventhough it's listed to work for Enterprise, I'm pretty sure it does exactly the same as changing the registry key I just listed. The windows 7 setup will think you have a specific version of windows installed then that allows you to perform an in-place repair install which will "downgrade" your windows version then.


    If you one of these posts answered your question or issue, please click on "Mark as answer". If a post contained helpfull information, please be so kind to click on the "Vote as helpful" button :)

    Saturday, December 11, 2010 8:08 PM
  • yes the tool does this and so it allows you to "downgrade".

    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code" CLIP- Stellvertreter http://www.winvistaside.de/
    Saturday, December 11, 2010 8:36 PM
  • An in-place repair upgrade can re-install missing or corrupted files, it does not delete or uninstall files from a higher version. There are many ways to trick Windows into believing your version is another one than the actually installed. One problem remains - you may end in a non-genuine Windows. For example, the hashes of Ultimate and HP are different, and I don't think the only thing that is checked when you enter a key, is some easily changeable registry entry. So, this "easy way" is not adviceable. Despite of the pros and cons of a clean re-install "from scratch" (pictures, videos, etc. aren't a problem with a timely backup; only programs with registry settings must be reinstalled), that's the only reliable way.
    "192 GB ought to be enough for anybody." (from the miniseries "Next Generation's Jokes")
    Saturday, December 11, 2010 8:44 PM
  • I recently had a harddisk failure on my main computer and purchased a new harddrive and installed a legal copy of Windows 7 Ultimate that was on a second computer that I rarely used.  I have a copy of Windows7 Home Premium that I want to install on the second computer, my question is can I put in the product key for the Home Premium or do I have to do a complete re-install?

          You would have to perform a "clean install" of Windows 7 Home Premium using a genuine Windows 7 Home Premium installation DVD.
    Carey Frisch
    Saturday, December 11, 2010 9:42 PM
    Moderator
  • An in-place repair upgrade can re-install missing or corrupted files, it does not delete or uninstall files from a higher version. There are many ways to trick Windows into believing your version is another one than the actually installed. One problem remains - you may end in a non-genuine Windows. For example, the hashes of Ultimate and HP are different, and I don't think the only thing that is checked when you enter a key, is some easily changeable registry entry. So, this "easy way" is not adviceable. Despite of the pros and cons of a clean re-install "from scratch" (pictures, videos, etc. aren't a problem with a timely backup; only programs with registry settings must be reinstalled), that's the only reliable way.
    "192 GB ought to be enough for anybody." (from the miniseries "Next Generation's Jokes")


    People have used this method since the days of RC1. It does work, you could even install a RC1 Ultimate on your pc, and then later upgrade/downgrade it (depends how you look at it) to a Windows 7 Home Premium RTM.

    Just because something is not supported doesn't mean it should not be given as a solution. Since the OP already knows that in the worst case he needs to re-install, which he can still do if the result is not as desired.

    The product key check is not based on that registy key, but the Windows 7 setup is. An inplace repair upgrade, is the same thing as installing windows 7 home premium, and then install windows 7 home premium as an upgrade on top of it again, the duration of it will take about the same time. If it were to only fix corrupted or missing files the installation of the in-place upgrade would only take 5 minutes. Sure your end product might be an installation of the size of Ultimate, while you only have the functionality of HP, but it will activate as an HP without issues.

     

    Kind regards,

    Stephan Schwarz.


    If you one of these posts answered your question or issue, please click on "Mark as answer". If a post contained helpfull information, please be so kind to click on the "Vote as helpful" button :)
    Saturday, December 11, 2010 11:56 PM
  • Thanks to all that replied, I decided to backup the important files onto a sepreate harddrive reformated and preformed a clean install.
    A. John Plaisier
    Wednesday, December 22, 2010 5:45 AM
  • Hello Everyone

    I was in a similar situation. I had "Windows 7 Home Prem OA HP" on a HP desktop I bought new and then upgraded the system to Ultimate with an Upgrade key. But now that I bought a refurb desktop with no OS (with a COA for "Windows Vista Business OEMAc") I needed to use that Ultimate license on the "new" refurb desktop. So my "downgrade ultimate to home premium" search brought me here, amongst other places.

    I used the registry solution explained here, except I changed the keys manually and did not use the deviantart tool. I figured I was better off hacking the puter manually myself. Thanks for the clarification Stephan Schwarz and Andre Ziegler. I did however used it this way (notice upper & lower case matching the "Ultimate" entry format):

    HKLM\Software\Microsot\Windows NT\CurrentVersion
         EditionID {Ultimate} > {HomePremium}
         ProductName {Windows 7 Ultimate} > {Windows 7 HomePremium}

    For reference, I also used the following posting on tomshardware (http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/13130-63-downgrading-win7-home-premium), specially the response by aquasystems.

    Then, I needed to do the "in-place repair upgrade." I tried using the windows 7 repair disk I had originally made with the HP desktop only to realize that it was not what I needed. What I needed was a Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit installation disk. Since I was afraid to use the system recovery disks for this hp desktop (who knows, it might have worked but I did not want to risk a complete recovery), I downloaded an iso image from digitalriver. For that I followed the advice and links I found on a microsoft community post (http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-windows_install/can-i-downgrade-from-windows-7-ultimate-to-home/ca6cda9a-3c44-40aa-880f-45b12947a880). I burned the iso image to a dvd using imgburn.

    To do the "in-place repair upgrade" I used the DVD I had made, pop it into the dvd drive and allowed autorun to start the process (you can navigate to the dvd and double click setup.exe if necessary). I then followed the process as presented by unawave (http://www.unawave.de/installation/downgrade-en.html?lang=EN), although the german screen shot in there is just superfluous. This was also a very good step by step site that helped me. I did not get a compatability report about the languages pack; only a small warning that the system needed rebooting before runing setup.exe (which I did before running setup.exe a second time). Then the rest of the process went as planned. When I was done, I was able to confirm that the windows version had been downgraded to Home Premium.

    But, a brief warning about activation of the product key. Once I "downgraded" I needed to re-activate my Home Premium key (stuck on the side of the tower of the HP desktop). When I treid activating it, the system responded that it was invalid and that I could not activate it online and needed to do a phone activation process. I figured, I was already done with the deed and since I legally owned the license (aka product key) I had nothing to loose. The pop-up warning window asked me to call a toll free number and follow instructions. The call was answered by an automated system which asked me to enter on the phone a total of seven (I think it was seven but don't quote me on that) six-digit numbers which were displayed on the pop-up instructions. After this, the automated response indicated that my activation was valid and that I needed to enter several six-digit numbers in the corresponding spaces on the pop-up instructions window, which I did. The automated system did allow for all six-digit numbers to be repeated so that I could verify I had entered them correctly. Then I completed this phone verification process and there it was ... the install was activated and fully functioning as it used to be. So, this was a successful "in-place repair upgrade" downgrade from Windows 7 Ultimate to Windows 7 Home Premium (HP original install).

    My thanks go to everyone who contributed in this thread on this page. Also, my thanks go to the following websites and postings which also helped me to do this. Mind you, I used the advice in all of them as advice only and did not follow anyone's instructions blindly or uniquely. Always do your homework before undertaking tinkering such as this ... and of course, always backup backup backup

    http://superuser.com/questions/339177/downgrade-from-windows-7-ultimate-to-professional-without-reinstall?rq=1

    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/13130-63-downgrading-win7-home-premium

    http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-windows_install/can-i-downgrade-from-windows-7-ultimate-to-home/ca6cda9a-3c44-40aa-880f-45b12947a880

    http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-windows_install/downgrading-from-windows-7-ultimate-to-windows-7/d0572e74-9eac-48f0-a5db-ba1c7031fb41

    http://www.unawave.de/installation/downgrade-en.html?lang=EN

    Thanks

    Gabe



    • Edited by TRS-Gabe Sunday, December 29, 2013 12:18 AM
    Sunday, December 29, 2013 12:16 AM