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34-bit to 64-bit?

    Question

  • So, i had 34-bit Vista home premium, and i couldn't upgrade to 64-bit 7 home premium, but i could upgrade to 34-bit, so i did. Now i want to install 64-bit, but it still gives me the same error message, "this installation disc isn't compatible with you version of windows. To upgrade, you need the correct installation disc. For more information, check your computer's system information. To install a new copy of Windows, restart (boot) your computer using the installation disc, and then select Custom (advanced)."

    I've tried booting with disc, and it just gave me the background of the installation, and it didn't start the installation.

    Now i was thinking if i were to format my hard drive, I could do a clean install, instead of an upgrade, but I'm afraid i might get stuck without an operating system.


    to sum it up i want to know two things:
    1. can i do a clean install?
    2. Will my installation code still work?

    here is a picture of the box i have (includes both 64-bit and 34-bit)

    http://i922.photobucket.com/albums/ad62/aaaaaaa987/Windows-7-Family-Pack-300x296.jpg
    Sunday, February 14, 2010 9:29 PM

Answers

  • You must do a clean install when moving between 32 bit and 64 bit.
    You MUST boot to the DVD you can not run it from within windows.
    You did check that everything you will be using has 64 bit drivers right??
    Printer, scanner, so on.
    • Marked as answer by Linda Yan Friday, February 19, 2010 5:47 AM
    Sunday, February 14, 2010 9:39 PM
  • 32 bit and 64 bit are different architectures and you cannot upgrade from one to the other - they are too different under the hood. You will have to do a clean install, but 64 bit machines need 64 bit drivers, so you will want to check to make sure your machine can handle it and that your peripherals have 64 bit drivers as well.

    Also, since you are doing a clean install, back up your data first to an external source.
    • Marked as answer by Linda Yan Friday, February 19, 2010 5:47 AM
    Sunday, February 14, 2010 11:15 PM

All replies

  • You must do a clean install when moving between 32 bit and 64 bit.
    You MUST boot to the DVD you can not run it from within windows.
    You did check that everything you will be using has 64 bit drivers right??
    Printer, scanner, so on.
    • Marked as answer by Linda Yan Friday, February 19, 2010 5:47 AM
    Sunday, February 14, 2010 9:39 PM
  • 32 bit and 64 bit are different architectures and you cannot upgrade from one to the other - they are too different under the hood. You will have to do a clean install, but 64 bit machines need 64 bit drivers, so you will want to check to make sure your machine can handle it and that your peripherals have 64 bit drivers as well.

    Also, since you are doing a clean install, back up your data first to an external source.
    • Marked as answer by Linda Yan Friday, February 19, 2010 5:47 AM
    Sunday, February 14, 2010 11:15 PM
  • 32 bit and 64 bit are different architectures and you cannot upgrade from one to the other - they are too different under the hood. You will have to do a clean install, but 64 bit machines need 64 bit drivers, so you will want to check to make sure your machine can handle it and that your peripherals have 64 bit drivers as well.

    Also, since you are doing a clean install, back up your data first to an external source.
    ah, but will my code work with the 64-bit disc even if i used it with the 32-bit already, also the box says upgrade, so i would guess i need to have a OS already.
    Monday, February 15, 2010 3:08 AM
  • important guys, please reply.
    Tuesday, February 16, 2010 2:20 AM
  • 32-bit programs work fine in 64-bit Windows.  I have yet to run into any real issues. 

    It's my opinion that all software should move to 64-bit and leave 32-bit permanently behind.  A lot of tasks have grown to the point that people hit the RAM limitations of 32-bit.  All hardware has been 64-capable for so long that it's unreasonable to argue that a newly developed application should expect to be installed on 32-bit hardware.  (Except in rare cases like the touch-screen software that waiters use in restaurants, all that niche stuff - those computers don't get updated until they stop working.)

    There are occasional minor inconveniences on 64-bit, usually seen by users doing uncommon tasks.  For example if you like using the text editor Vim, you have to search around to find an alternate 64-bit version or else the right-click menu doesn't have the "Edit with Vim" entry in it.  Enough of the world is on 64-bit by now that almost all tasks have been updated to work properly.


    Answering the questions:

    You CAN upgrade from 32-bit to 64-bit, as long as your computer has a 64-bit processor.  These combinations work:
    -  32-bit computer with 32-bit OS  (you only have this if the computer is five or more years old.)
    -  64-bit computer with 32-bit OS
    -  64-bit computer with 64-bit OS


    You are only having trouble upgrading to 64-bit because you are trying to run the upgrade from within Windows.  32-bit Windows cannot run 64-bit programs, and the 64-bit Windows installer is a 64-bit program.  (To prevent someone on a 32-bit computer installing 64-bit windows and not being able to boot.)  64-bit windows can run 32-bit programs just fine.

    Put the CD in your CD drive and restart your computer.  Watch for it to say "Press any key to boot to CD . . . . . . " or something similar, and hit keyboard keys when it comes up.  You may have to press F12 or some similar key to access a boot options menu.  The BIOS Setup controls whether or not the computer will try to boot from CD.

    When you boot to the CD, you will be able to do the clean install.  The upgrade disk will detect your previously installed Windows and allow the upgrade when it sees it on the hard drive.

    YOUR DATA WILL BE ERASED.  NOTHING WILL BE LEFT ON YOUR HARD DRIVE AFTER DOING THIS UPGRADE.   You need to copy all your stuff to an external hard drive, or buy a fresh hard drive to install the 64-bit Windows and copy your old data directly.  (That's what I do - keeps the OS hard drive well below its expected failure date.)


    I believe your license key will work fine with the 64-bit even if you've already used it with the 32-bit install.  If it does not, you should be able to call Microsoft and have them do the activation.  I've had to do that before on XP.  They don't bust your balls about it or anything.  If you bought the program, they'll make sure you get it licensed properly.
    Tuesday, February 16, 2010 3:19 AM