none
defragmentation

    Question

  • I have instaled Win7RC (32bit) on my laptop (hp EliteBook6930p). Everything seems to run properly, except I am not able to lounch Analysis or Defragmentation of any drive, whatever its format (NTFS or FAT)
    Monday, July 27, 2009 10:21 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    Solution 1:

    DCom Server Process Launcher (DComLaunch) service was introduced in Windows Operating System. One of the major side-effects user face after disabling the DComLaunch service is that the Disk Defragmenter console fails to operate. The Analyze and Defragment buttons do not work. Also, launching the console Defrag (defrag.exe) utility causes the following error:

    Windows cannot connect to the Disk Defragmenter engine

    Enable the DCOM Process Launcher Service

    1. Click Start, Run and type Services.msc

    2. Double-click DCOM Server Process Launcher

    3. Set its startup type to Automatic

    4. Restart Windows.

    Additional Information

    Windows Firewall service may fail to start after disabling DComLaunch. See KB892504 titled The Windows Firewall service cannot start if the DCOM Process Launcher Service is disabled.
    ========

    Solution 2:

    Disk Defragmentation in Vista
    Windows Vista now comes with an automatic disk defrag tool that is enabled by default. Specifically, it is set to run at 1am every Wednesday. You can disable or modify this by performing the following steps:

    1) Click the “Start Orb”
    2) Click the Control Panel
    3) Click “System and Maintenance”
    4) Finally, choose “Defragment your hard drive” from under “Administrative Tools” (at the bottom of the menu/list).

    Or, my favorite/quick way:

    1) Press the “Windows Button” on your keyboard, type “Disk Defrag” and press enter.

    Again, the power of typing what you want to run in the search field at the bottom of the start menu is a huge time saver. I’ve read a few books now that talk about “Run” missing from the start menu as though it is a horrible thing, with instructions on how to get it back. There really is no need—the search field does the job better than Run ever did. And if you really want run for any reason, pressing “Windows” and “R” together still does the trick.

    But I digress…

    The defrag menu is as shown in the image below. You can simply uncheck the “Run on a schedule” box to disable it, or pres the “Modify schedule” button to pick a new time.

     

    But that’s for users. What you need is a nice command line interface and you’ve got it here...
    defrag -a [-v]
    defrag [{-r | -w}] [-f] [-v]
    defrag -c [{-r | -w}] [-f] [-v]

    Specifies the drive letter or mount point path of the volume to be defragmented or analyzed
    -c = Defragments all volumes on this computer
    -a = Performs fragmentation analysis only
    -r = Performs partial defragmentation (default). Attempts to consolidate only fragments smaller than 64 megabytes (MB)
    -w = Performs full defragmentation. Attempts to consolidate all file fragments, regardless of their size
    -f = Forces defragmentation of the volume when free space is low
    -v = Verbose mode; the defragmentation and analysis output is more detailed

    For example, to check how things are doing on one of my test systems, I ran “defrag c: -a” and got the following back at the command line (note that you must run the command prompt as Admin).

    Windows Disk Defragmenter
    Copyright (c) 2006 Microsoft Corp.

    Analysis report for volume C:

    Volume size = 16.00 GB
    Free space = 7.92 GB
    Largest free space extent = 4.78 GB
    Percent file fragmentation = 0 %

    Note: On NTFS volumes, file fragments larger than 64MB are not included in the fragmentation statistics

    You do not need to defragment this volume.

    and you can see more related information on defragmentation in win 7.


    http://blogs.msdn.com/e7/archive/2009/01/25/disk-defragmentation-background-and-engineering-the-windows-7-improvements.aspx

    Monday, August 03, 2009 6:24 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • I wish I could help you, your problem sounds very interesting.

    Although, I did want to know, when you open Disk De-fragmentation, does the program run, or does it just fizzle?

    And if it does run but does not work properly, are there any windows that tell you about an error?
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 12:13 AM
  • Hi,

    Solution 1:

    DCom Server Process Launcher (DComLaunch) service was introduced in Windows Operating System. One of the major side-effects user face after disabling the DComLaunch service is that the Disk Defragmenter console fails to operate. The Analyze and Defragment buttons do not work. Also, launching the console Defrag (defrag.exe) utility causes the following error:

    Windows cannot connect to the Disk Defragmenter engine

    Enable the DCOM Process Launcher Service

    1. Click Start, Run and type Services.msc

    2. Double-click DCOM Server Process Launcher

    3. Set its startup type to Automatic

    4. Restart Windows.

    Additional Information

    Windows Firewall service may fail to start after disabling DComLaunch. See KB892504 titled The Windows Firewall service cannot start if the DCOM Process Launcher Service is disabled.
    ========

    Solution 2:

    Disk Defragmentation in Vista
    Windows Vista now comes with an automatic disk defrag tool that is enabled by default. Specifically, it is set to run at 1am every Wednesday. You can disable or modify this by performing the following steps:

    1) Click the “Start Orb”
    2) Click the Control Panel
    3) Click “System and Maintenance”
    4) Finally, choose “Defragment your hard drive” from under “Administrative Tools” (at the bottom of the menu/list).

    Or, my favorite/quick way:

    1) Press the “Windows Button” on your keyboard, type “Disk Defrag” and press enter.

    Again, the power of typing what you want to run in the search field at the bottom of the start menu is a huge time saver. I’ve read a few books now that talk about “Run” missing from the start menu as though it is a horrible thing, with instructions on how to get it back. There really is no need—the search field does the job better than Run ever did. And if you really want run for any reason, pressing “Windows” and “R” together still does the trick.

    But I digress…

    The defrag menu is as shown in the image below. You can simply uncheck the “Run on a schedule” box to disable it, or pres the “Modify schedule” button to pick a new time.

     

    But that’s for users. What you need is a nice command line interface and you’ve got it here...
    defrag -a [-v]
    defrag [{-r | -w}] [-f] [-v]
    defrag -c [{-r | -w}] [-f] [-v]

    Specifies the drive letter or mount point path of the volume to be defragmented or analyzed
    -c = Defragments all volumes on this computer
    -a = Performs fragmentation analysis only
    -r = Performs partial defragmentation (default). Attempts to consolidate only fragments smaller than 64 megabytes (MB)
    -w = Performs full defragmentation. Attempts to consolidate all file fragments, regardless of their size
    -f = Forces defragmentation of the volume when free space is low
    -v = Verbose mode; the defragmentation and analysis output is more detailed

    For example, to check how things are doing on one of my test systems, I ran “defrag c: -a” and got the following back at the command line (note that you must run the command prompt as Admin).

    Windows Disk Defragmenter
    Copyright (c) 2006 Microsoft Corp.

    Analysis report for volume C:

    Volume size = 16.00 GB
    Free space = 7.92 GB
    Largest free space extent = 4.78 GB
    Percent file fragmentation = 0 %

    Note: On NTFS volumes, file fragments larger than 64MB are not included in the fragmentation statistics

    You do not need to defragment this volume.

    and you can see more related information on defragmentation in win 7.


    http://blogs.msdn.com/e7/archive/2009/01/25/disk-defragmentation-background-and-engineering-the-windows-7-improvements.aspx

    Monday, August 03, 2009 6:24 PM
    Moderator
  • Try using Defraggler (defraggler.com ) to defragment the drive. To me, it's a lot better than Windows's built in defragmenting, as I can see exactly what parts of the drive are fragmented, not just a percentage disk defragmenter would tell me.

    Hello! Please try every solution given to your problem...and reply back, promptly if possible with its results...

    Click here for my thread on Win7 min. system requirements
    - JoelbX
    Monday, August 03, 2009 9:47 PM