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Apps not allowed when UAC is disabled

    Question

  • First a brief background on why I disable UAC. I'm a Windows Power User. I use the command-line extensively to automate application installs, script system configuration, develop software, and much more. I run using a domain account which is a member of the Administrators. About 80% of what I do on my system is through the shell (PowerShell in particular). As a result, UAC is a nuisance. If UAC is enabled, the shell opens up without sufficient privilege to do much at all. It's not possible to modify environment variables nor install system programs. Basically, it's impossible to perform much of the automation I achieve through the shell. I can run an elevated command shell, but that shell doesn't run as the user with which I'm logged-in, so doesn't have the correct settings or environment to operate effectively (can't connect to proper network shares, can't honor or edit local user's settings, etc), so it's not a viable alternative.

    With Windows 7, I simply disabled UAC and that worked great for me. As an advanced power user, software engineer, and network security professional, I'm able to avoid the common pitfalls that UAC was designed to protect.

    Unfortunately, it seems that with Windows 8, disabling UAC also disables essential apps, such as the built-in PDF reader and launching Internet Explorer from Metro. If I try to open a PDF, I get an error, "This app can't be activate when UAC is disabled." Obviously, this is inconvenient. I would like to be able to use all of the features of Windows 8 as an administrator. Enabling UAC renders my system unusable from the shell, so is not an option.

    I did a search on this error message, but there's not much out there about this message currently (Google returned one relevant result in English).

    So I have two questions.

    First, what apps are affected? So far I've only encountered it with the PDF viewer and when launching IE from the Start Menu (or Metro... not sure what to call it yet), though I can launch IE from its shortcut. If this issue is isolated to just the PDF viewer and metro-launched apps, I should be able to work around it.

    Second, is there any way to enable these apps to activate when UAC is disabled (bypass the check that causes the error), or is there any alternative to avoid this error?

    Thursday, September 27, 2012 10:40 AM

Answers

  • Registry 'Power User' tips. 

    http://developex.com/custom-software/devxexec.html

    devxexec.exe /user:TrustedInstaller regedit.exe

    This looks like a good read, with a lot of technical detail. I'm not sure it's the tool for me, because it's not obvious to me which user I should exec as (Administrator, TrustedInstaller, etc). In particular, I want the symbolic links to be owned by me and not have any strange permissions due to being created by another user. It doesn't appear as if devxexec nor 'runas' allow running as the same user but with the Administrator token. If I'm wrong, please correct me.

    I have found that running with UAC disabled but always running my Console2/PowerShell application with "run as Administrator" enabled works very well. The console then runs in my user context, but with the Administrator token, so I'm able to create symbolic links and do all of the other work I'm used to doing, but then most apps (including Metro) launch as the limited User account.

    I did lower the UAC warnings to the lowest level, essentially None, because I want to be able to rapidly spin up the command prompt without any interference, but that's my preference and I'm willing to accept the security risks that go with that.

    Monday, October 01, 2012 3:12 PM

All replies

  • There is no way to run the new "Windows Store Apps" (metro) when UAC is disabled. Sorry.

    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code"

    Thursday, September 27, 2012 1:50 PM
  • Okay, so I'm going to attempt to enable UAC, and struggle through each of the problems that arises. I will create new questions for each issues that I encounter and link to them here. Let's see if I can make Windows work for a power user.
    Thursday, September 27, 2012 3:54 PM
  • Try enabling this setting so that your token is not filtered and runs properly elevated under your own Creds.  (keeping mapped drives, etc) -  update - I am not sure this is working in Windows 8, can anyone else confirm ?

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/937624

    Important This workaround may make your system unsafe. Microsoft does not support this workaround. Use this workaround at your own risk.
    To work around this problem, configure the EnableLinkedConnections registry value. This value enables Windows Vista or Windows 7 to share network connections between the filtered access token and the full administrator access token for a member of the Administrators group. After you configure this registry value, LSA checks whether there is another access token that is associated with the current user session if a network resource is mapped to an access token. If LSA determines that there is a linked access token, it adds the network share to the linked location.
    To configure the EnableLinkedConnections registry value, follow these steps:
       1. Click Start, type regedit in the Start Search box, and then press Enter.
       2. Locate and then right-click the following registry subkey:
          HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System
       3. Point to New, and then click DWORD Value.
       4. Type EnableLinkedConnections, and then press Enter.
       5. Right-click EnableLinkedConnections, and then click Modify.
       6. In the Value data box, type 1, and then click OK.
       7. Exit Registry Editor, and then restart the computer.

    Here is an inline elevation script.  If you rewrite it as a wrapper script, (or drop into your profile as a callable function) all your scripts will self elevate.  Combined with the above registry key, things will go more smoothly. 

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/virtual_pc_guy/archive/2010/09/23/a-self-elevating-powershell-script.aspx


    Don't forget to mark your posts as answered so they drop off the unanswered post filter. If I've helped you and you want to show your gratitude, just click that green thingy.


    Thursday, September 27, 2012 4:05 PM
  • I've re-enabled UAC so I can run Windows Store Apps (including Internet Explorer, apparently), but one of the first problems I encounter is the creation of symbolic links. According to this thread, the privilege to create symbolic links can't be assigned to users if UAC is enabled. This requires the scripts and programs to run as Administrator.

    Next I'll try Knuckle-Dragger's suggestion to see if this helps the situation.

    I was pleased to find that I can set my command-prompt (Console2-hosted PowerShell) to run as Administrator, and it still shows me as the user and has my environment variables, so that may be a solution.

    Friday, September 28, 2012 1:18 AM
  • Knuckle-Dragger,

    This is some helpful information. The elevation technique looks helpful. I'll see if I can re-write the elevation script as a function to act like 'sudo' does on Unix.

    Friday, September 28, 2012 1:51 AM
  • This is curious. When I install, I turn off the UAC, as my default. I have no problems opening the Store or anything in the Metro screen. What I have found, is that disabling the Windows Firewall, or using certain antivirus programs (Avast in particular), disables the store and Metro apps.

    (Windows 8 RTM - 64 Bit)


    David Clarke

    • Proposed as answer by dexkib Saturday, September 29, 2012 1:38 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by dexkib Saturday, September 29, 2012 1:38 AM
    Friday, September 28, 2012 5:05 AM
  • Registry 'Power User' tips. 

    http://developex.com/custom-software/devxexec.html

    devxexec.exe /user:TrustedInstaller regedit.exe

    http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/155910-taking-back-the-registry-from-trustedinstaller/


    Don't forget to mark your posts as answered so they drop off the unanswered post filter. If I've helped you and you want to show your gratitude, just click that green thingy.

    (they shouldn't put the edit button so close to the propose buttun)




    Friday, September 28, 2012 12:24 PM
  • This is curious. When I install, I turn off the UAC, as my default. I have no problems opening the Store or anything in the Metro screen. What I have found, is that disabling the Windows Firewall, or using certain antivirus programs (Avast in particular), disables the store and Metro apps.

    (Windows 8 RTM - 64 Bit)


    David Clarke


    Davehc1: That is *not* the real disabling of UAC. For example, start a command prompt with: WINDOWS + R, then cmd, and you'll see it's not running in admin mode :( You have to somehow restart the command prompt in admin mode to do things like: administrative tasks or create symbolic links (mklink)
    Sunday, September 30, 2012 6:43 AM
  • First, what apps are affected? So far I've only encountered it with the PDF viewer and when launching IE from the Start Menu (or Metro... not sure what to call it yet), though I can launch IE from its shortcut. If this issue is isolated to just the PDF viewer and metro-launched apps, I should be able to work around it.
    Good choice.  Win8 is better without "metro" apps anyways.  You can change your IE settings to open in the desktop from the start screen for added convenience.  Also, since MS word now included a PDF reader, the deployment of a standalone program is less useful for office enabled installs.
    Sunday, September 30, 2012 4:33 PM
  • This is curious. When I install, I turn off the UAC, as my default. I have no problems opening the Store or anything in the Metro screen. What I have found, is that disabling the Windows Firewall, or using certain antivirus programs (Avast in particular), disables the store and Metro apps.

    (Windows 8 RTM - 64 Bit)


    David Clarke

    Davehc1: That is *not* the real disabling of UAC. For example, start a command prompt with: WINDOWS + R, then cmd, and you'll see it's not running in admin mode :( You have to somehow restart the command prompt in admin mode to do things like: administrative tasks or create symbolic links (mklink)

    I may disagree. Admin responsibilities are another concern. But, my post was remarking on the thread and it's posts. The discussion is only concerned with the matter of the UAC being wound down or up - no other issue.


    David Clarke

    Monday, October 01, 2012 4:55 AM
  • This is curious. When I install, I turn off the UAC, as my default. I have no problems opening the Store or anything in the Metro screen. What I have found, is that disabling the Windows Firewall, or using certain antivirus programs (Avast in particular), disables the store and Metro apps.

    (Windows 8 RTM - 64 Bit)


    David Clarke


    I've installed Windows Professional, joined it to a domain, and disabled UAC. I have not disabled Windows Firewall (or configured it in any way) nor have I installed any AntiVirus programs. I'm running as a domain admin, yet when I try to launch a PDF or start IE from the start menu, it fails with the reported error.

    Dave, can you clarify how you turn off the UAC? Have you confirmed that you are able to open PDFs (and that they are opening with the Windows PDF viewer via Metro)? Are you able to open IE from the start menu? Have you confirmed that you have in fact disabled UAC (when you click Windows + R and type cmd as timootei suggested, are you running as admin and can you create symlinks)?

    Please try to answer each of my questions, as if you in fact have a configuration that allows running Metro apps with UAC disabled, I would like to learn how to do that.

    Monday, October 01, 2012 2:58 PM
  • You can change your IE settings to open in the desktop from the start screen for added convenience.
    Good tip. For completeness, this setting is in the Internet Properties under the Programs Tab, "Opening Internet Explorer."  I haven't yet tried it with UAC disabled, however.
    Monday, October 01, 2012 3:04 PM
  • Registry 'Power User' tips. 

    http://developex.com/custom-software/devxexec.html

    devxexec.exe /user:TrustedInstaller regedit.exe

    This looks like a good read, with a lot of technical detail. I'm not sure it's the tool for me, because it's not obvious to me which user I should exec as (Administrator, TrustedInstaller, etc). In particular, I want the symbolic links to be owned by me and not have any strange permissions due to being created by another user. It doesn't appear as if devxexec nor 'runas' allow running as the same user but with the Administrator token. If I'm wrong, please correct me.

    I have found that running with UAC disabled but always running my Console2/PowerShell application with "run as Administrator" enabled works very well. The console then runs in my user context, but with the Administrator token, so I'm able to create symbolic links and do all of the other work I'm used to doing, but then most apps (including Metro) launch as the limited User account.

    I did lower the UAC warnings to the lowest level, essentially None, because I want to be able to rapidly spin up the command prompt without any interference, but that's my preference and I'm willing to accept the security risks that go with that.

    Monday, October 01, 2012 3:12 PM
  • Sounds good.  Here is another, apparently DCOM is messing about with our Explorer.exe token, this is a cure for that.

    http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/144776-unable-to-open-an-elevated-windows-explorer-window/

    I'm going to use dvexexec for regedit without having to take-ownership, I can drop my reg add commands in a batch file, and call the batch file from dvexexec.   Takes one line via batch vs 3 lines for set-acl method (take-ownership, set full permission, then edit registry).   Easier for me to upkeep.


    Don't forget to mark your posts as answered so they drop off the unanswered post filter. If I've helped you and you want to show your gratitude, just click that green thingy.




    Monday, October 01, 2012 3:21 PM
  • .

    Dave, can you clarify how you turn off the UAC? Have you confirmed that you are able to open PDFs (and that they are opening with the Windows PDF viewer via Metro)? Are you able to open IE from the start menu? Have you confirmed that you have in fact disabled UAC (when you click Windows + R and type cmd as timootei suggested, are you running as admin and can you create symlinks)?

    Please try to answer each of my questions, as if you in fact have a configuration that allows running Metro apps with UAC disabled, I would like to learn how to do that.

     I run Nitro as default, but, for the exercise, I re enabled the Reader as my PDF default - It ran perfectly.. But I have turned the UAC to the bottom, through Msconfig. I open the Desktop IE (My preference) from the Metro start. I "Pinned to start" from the .exe in program files (x86). Otherwise all of my Metro icons are opening without problem. I cannot confirm I can that I can create symbolic links, as I have no reason to use them.

    As I intimated to Timootei, As far as I am concerned, I have the UAC off, to my satisfaction. I do not receive popup requests. It would serve no real purpose to me to lower the UAC security further.


    David Clarke

    Monday, October 01, 2012 4:44 PM
  • Thanks for clarifying. Having UAC turned all the way to the bottom (warnings dialed down) is different that having UAC disabled, and I think that's what Tim was trying to say, and that's the reason why you don't encounter the issues I did.

    And indeed, that's what I've ended up doing - keeping UAC enabled, but dialed down. Now my apps start nicely, but I can only create symbolic links (and perform other administrative tasks from the command line) if I launch the command line with "run as Administrator" checked.

    Monday, October 01, 2012 4:50 PM
  • I am in the same boat, aswell though I ain't such a power powershell user as the OP.

    Though, having bought Windows 8 *PROFESSIONAL* (i.e. not "beginner", "noob", or "don't touch this or it might explode" version). I get ANNOYED everytime I want to change hostfile for example, or copy something into program files (yes, I do NOT like to install software which can be obtained as a .zip - VLC or MPC-HC for example)

    Having to run everything through a dumb right click - "Run as Administrator" doesnt make the system make feel convenient to use, though. But rather annoying. Yes, sure - I can understand 90% of the users do a "next next next" type of installations and one extra window with popup "are you sure" is going to definitely stop them (oh right ... )

    So once again - question:

    Is it possible to COMPLETELY disable UAC and have the damn Metro Apps running??? (yes, well I find PDF reader handy for example) Not to say I paid for the damn thing.

    Not to mention I get extensively frustrated when I search for topics like this and am unable to find ANYTHING RELEVANT on the net (not to mention answers for the Windows Server family).


    Sunday, December 02, 2012 8:40 AM
  • My issue is no where near as technical as the rest of you guys. I just hate UAC. I dont need my computer to hold my hand. If i wanted that i would have bought a Mac.

    So to Microsoft everyone from the the power users to the daily gamer requests a solution to this issue. 

    Monday, December 03, 2012 2:22 PM
  • I whole-heartedly agree. Traditionally, Microsoft has been about providing the only robust, commercially-developed operating system while maintaining broad user preference support. This reason has kept me from migrating to Mac, which has a nice interface if you want to take it as-is. I don't. I want an operating system in which I'm free to choose which features I want and which supplies hooks for third-party vendors to supply features in the long tail. At the point that I'm no longer able to customize the Windows environment as much as I could a Mac environment, I will certainly jump ship (as Apple has the better hardware). I'm not there yet, but this new constraint adds one more nail.
    Monday, December 03, 2012 2:31 PM
  • Need some help here, re-enabled UAC but still can't use the metro apps!!

    Nothing About Me!

    Monday, December 03, 2012 10:28 PM
  • Need some help here, re-enabled UAC but still can't use the metro apps!!


    Nothing About Me!

    Backup any user files and install 8 fresh


    Windows MVP, XP, Vista, 7 and 8. More people have climbed Everest than having 3 MVP's on the wall.

    Hardcore Games, Legendary is the only Way to Play

    Developer | Windows IT | Chess | Economics | Vegan Advocate | PC Reviews

    What a... no thank you! Moved the slider to always notify and restarted. After restart I moved the slider to middle, the default level, restarted again and is fixed.

    Nothing About Me!


    • Edited by N3CR0PHAG1A Monday, December 03, 2012 11:34 PM
    Monday, December 03, 2012 11:19 PM
  • I couldn't agree more.

    This is getting ridiculous---no metro apps work for me at all once I joined the domain.  Microsoft needs to figure a way how to resolve this issues.

    Friday, June 28, 2013 11:59 PM
  • I suggest getting used to the UAC as its now more important in the security of the platform.

    I also design programs to check for security routinely.


    Windows MVP, XP, Vista, 7 and 8. More people have climbed Everest than having 3 MVP's on the wall.

    Hardcore Games, Legendary is the only Way to Play

    Developer | Windows IT | Chess | Economics | Vegan Advocate | PC Reviews

    sorry... i wish people would quit spouting this untruth.  UAC does absolutely nothing for protecting your system.  Go look at the forums that talk about uac vs non uac.  I alway disable it.  UAC DOES NOT IMPROVE SECURITY!!!!!!! A simple script can bypass uac completely.  If uac was a security end all?  why have windows defender? AV? etc?  I have personally disinfected many systems with uac enabled.  UAC is not su or sudo and will never be.
    Saturday, June 29, 2013 12:56 AM
  • Agreed.  UAC is just a poor implementation of a questionable idea.  There are altogether too many of these in Windows.

    It doesn't appear that with Windows 8.1 the rules are any different.  It's stupid, really.  Microsoft at one time saw the light and made it possible for people to disable UAC, but apparently the management in charge of Metro/Modern thinks they know better than all the power users.

    I've run Windows systems without UAC for years - machines with gigabit connections on which engineers browse the web freely.  No infections.

    Configuring Internet Explorer to be less permissive by default, taking measures to block parasite web servers, backing up the strategy with an anti-malware package as nothing more than a safety net, and perhaps most importantly educating users on good computing practices - THESE are the bona fide ways to avoid malware.  UAC is just a stupid hack that makes a serious computer user's life more difficult.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Saturday, June 29, 2013 1:37 PM
  • Hiho,

    Same issue on Windows 8.1 Enterprise Enterprise Edition.

    Try this baby here:

    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System]
    "EnableLUA"=dword:00000001

    Cheers,

    Helmut

    Just a little help from your friends (tm) :-)

    Friday, November 22, 2013 10:07 AM
  • How does enabling the bogus "feature" being discussed here help, Helmut?

    In answer to Jason's original question, as far as I can see everything you can do with a Microsoft "App" you can do with a desktop solution, including things like reading PDFs (the Adobe Reader software is still out there and works just fine with Windows 8), playing media (Media Player on the desktop, anyone?).  You can even still configure everything as far as I can see.

    It turns out disabling UAC by setting EnableLUA to 0 not only gets you your full-time Administrator status, but it also just shuts off all the useless Metro/Modern fluff and allows you to concentrate on computing and real work.  Seems like a Good Thing all around to me.

      

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options


    • Edited by Noel Carboni Friday, November 22, 2013 1:41 PM wording
    • Proposed as answer by Noel Carboni Friday, November 22, 2013 1:47 PM
    Friday, November 22, 2013 1:39 PM
  • Well, that's a load of malarkey, VF.  If you think you need UAC then I suggest you're not Administrator-level material.

    I haven't "endured" UAC for years, since Vista first came out.  Consequences?

    • I've been a full-time administrator, in CHARGE of my workstation.  Everything just works; I don't have to convince the system to execute my commands.
       
    • I have had zero (0) BUPKIS, NADA malware infections.  It hasn't even gotten close.
       
    • On my main workstation I have used the same OS install since the first time it went in.  One install each of Vista x64, Windows 7 x64, and Windows 8.1 x64, then a highly productive, useful system that has just stayed fast and usable throughout its life.  I even used Windows Backup/Restore a few times to migrate the same OS install across hardware replacements after failures.

     

    It just takes knowing what you're doing.  There are far, FAR better methods to keep malware away than inviting it into your system then at the last possible minute trying to keep it from getting at the family jewels.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options



    Friday, November 22, 2013 1:57 PM
  • You're advocating the end users of the world use UAC.  I'm saying UAC is for end users, not administrators.

    The issue is that too many people don't understand that there's a difference between these user populations. 

    Ignoring the difference is just silly.  Computers are powerful enough and operating systems can be complex enough to support both.  Implying that everyone you run across (especially here) is a noob and incapable of working with the training wheels off is just wrong.

      

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options


    Friday, November 22, 2013 2:55 PM
  • >You're advocating the end users of the world use UAC.  I'm saying UAC is for end users, not administrators.
     
    It works just fine for me as an administrator.  I actually like seeing
    how normal users have to do things as it makes me a more effective
    administrator and there's really no harm done in using UAC, and possible
    help.
     
    >Implying that everyone you run across (especially here) is a noob and incapable of working with the training wheels off is just wrong.
     
    Perhaps *everyone* should remember that.
     
     

    Bob Comer - Microsoft MVP Virtual Machine
    Friday, November 22, 2013 3:45 PM
  • Bob, really.

    • I advocate the ability to disable UAC and continue to use all the software.
       
    • You chime in and say you don't mind it and what a good thing it is to have it on.

     

    You always try to make it sound like you're being the reasonable one, but...

    I'm saying a setting that would allow us both to have it our way would be nice.  You're saying what?  That it's right that I shouldn't be able to run Metro/Modern apps but have the rest of the system work the way I want?!?

    You are arguing for restriction, while I am arguing for choice.  Who's being more reasonable?

    Perhaps I should jump to your level:  I think you and everyone else should be forced to use a system with no protections at all, because everyone should need be educated and capable to use a computer.

    See how silly it sounds to generalize everyone together?

    I'm sorry, but if you find it pleasant to use a computer that's set to second guess everything you do, then you're either doing irresponsible things or happen to be doing things where it doesn't often interfere.  You're reasonable and smart enough to know that everyone doesn't do or need the same things from their computers

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options


    Friday, November 22, 2013 7:02 PM
  • >I'm saying a setting that would allow us both to have it our way would be nice.  You're saying what?  That it's right that I shouldn't be able to run Metro/Modern apps but have the rest of the system work the way I want?!?
     
    I'm saying that it's good for an administrator too and doesn't get in the
    way as you suggest.
     
    It's the usual pattern of you defining what a power user is and how he
    works, when in fact I know that's not the case for me.
     
    >You are arguing for restriction, while I am arguing for choice.  Who's being more reasonable?
     
    I am not advocating you run any way, but you and others are belittling
    how other people do things -- and who's more reasonable??  Not you.
     
    >See how silly it sounds to generalize everyone together?
     
    EXACTLY!!!!
     
    >I'm sorry, but if you find it pleasant to use a computer that's set to second guess everything you do, then you're either doing irresponsible things or happen to be doing things where it doesn't often interfere.  You're reasonable and smart enough to know that everyone doesn't do or need the same things from their computers
     
    I rest my case.
     
     

    Bob Comer - Microsoft MVP Virtual Machine
    Friday, November 22, 2013 8:02 PM
  • I'm sorry, but if you find it pleasant to use a computer that's set to second guess everything you do, then you're either doing irresponsible things or happen to be doing things where it doesn't often interfere.  You're reasonable and smart enough to know that everyone doesn't do or need the same things from their computers

    I rest my case.

    Really?  I have no plans to rest mine.  

    You refuted an absolutely reasonable and correct statement with that response.  I'm sorry if you felt insulted, but I suggest you get over it; I have no intention of candy-coating reality just for you.

    UAC is a stupid "feature" designed to protect the system from people who don't know what they're doing.  I'm not even going to qualify that with an IMO.  It's a simple truth.

    Nothing you or anyone says is going to change that UAC needs to be disabled for some kinds of computer usage. 

    That you might not partake in that kind of usage doesn't change that fact.

    If you want to discuss specifics...  As each new OS has come out, I have used UAC for months, gave it a proper try.  It turned out unworkable every time.  I keep UAC enabled in my VMs for testing - to understand what users are going to see.  That's the extent of its usefulness.

    What I NEVER saw was a case where UAC HELPED me one bit

    But there ARE things that are clunky and stay clunky despite your best efforts to set [ ] Run As Administrator flags, turn prompting down, change permissions, etc.

    There are ongoing permissions issues you can't just get around easily; applications you just can't drag and drop to/from; things you find out you had to start As Administrator so you have to start over, files that don't actually write into the folder you specify but are redirected somewhere else... The list goes on and on, it's a MESS - and working around ALL these things takes your mind off what you're trying to accomplish.

    Some folks expect to take computing to a higher level than others, and I imagine that's the root of most disagreements on this subject.

    If you like UAC or need it and have a high tolerance for pain, use it.  I have no problem with that.  More power to you.

    I DO have a problem with a feature that can't be turned off without causing an arbitrary loss of functionality.  I'm in complete agreement with the first post in this thread.  Bravo to Jason for having the balls to bring it up.

    It'll only be a matter of time before someone discovers the right incantations to be able to allow Metro/Modern apps to be run on a UAC-disabled system - if Microsoft doesn't drop that arbitrary limitation themselves.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options


    • Edited by Noel Carboni Saturday, November 23, 2013 2:15 AM
    Saturday, November 23, 2013 2:13 AM
  • Well said. UAC is garbage that gets in the way especially for development systems.

    Development systems NOT production systems. This is precisely where the App store would be used most.

    Well MS, forget your app store because permanent "runas admin" is far more important to me.

    No wonder its (app store) having trouble getting off the ground with decent apps, you keep getting in your own way.

    Friday, January 03, 2014 5:22 PM
  • So here's a thing.   I work for an entity with its own IT department, which is notoriously stubborn (as many are.)  In order for our computers to join the internal wireless, UAC has to be disabled.    Having the Apps not work because of a required setting from on-high is super-duper annoying.  
    Monday, June 23, 2014 8:55 PM
  • Out of curiosity, why?  What useful things are there in the App Store that you need?

    It's possible to run Windows 8.1 as an exclusively desktop system.  It works well this way, actually.

    Don't get me wrong, I think it's utterly ridiculous of Microsoft to have arbitrarily decided that UAC must be enabled to run any Metro/Modern toy. 

    They've dug their own grave with this one.  They couldn't force it on people in Vista and they're not going to get away with it this time either.

      

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Monday, June 23, 2014 10:43 PM
  • There is a metro in 8.1. Humm. I must have missed that part of OS
    Tuesday, June 24, 2014 12:24 AM