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It is possible to disable / delete the Metro UI / Apps / Start Screen?

    Question

  • I have installed Windows 8 on a workstation with a large monitor and no touch capabilities. The new user interface and the associated Apps designed for it are inappropriate for this type of machine. How do I disable or delete the Start Tiles, Apps (Mail, IE, etc.) and have it login directly to the Desktop interface?
    Saturday, August 18, 2012 7:04 PM

Answers

  • I have installed Windows 8 on a workstation with a large monitor and no touch capabilities. The new user interface and the associated Apps designed for it are inappropriate for this type of machine. How do I disable or delete the Start Tiles, Apps (Mail, IE, etc.) and have it login directly to the Desktop interface?

    Hi

    You cannot, currently disable the Windows 8 UI (Metro).

    You can boot directly to the Desktop, if you wish.

    On the Start Screen, place the Desktop Tile in the number 1 postition (Top Row/First Column).

    1. When you start Windows 8, on the login screen, enter your user profile password.

    2. Press the Enter Key. This will take you directly to the Desktop.

    Regards


    Saturday, August 18, 2012 7:53 PM

All replies

  • Hi, you cannot do that, The Start Screen is embedded inside Windows 8, classic start menu has gone.
    Saturday, August 18, 2012 7:27 PM
  • I have installed Windows 8 on a workstation with a large monitor and no touch capabilities. The new user interface and the associated Apps designed for it are inappropriate for this type of machine. How do I disable or delete the Start Tiles, Apps (Mail, IE, etc.) and have it login directly to the Desktop interface?

    Hi

    You cannot, currently disable the Windows 8 UI (Metro).

    You can boot directly to the Desktop, if you wish.

    On the Start Screen, place the Desktop Tile in the number 1 postition (Top Row/First Column).

    1. When you start Windows 8, on the login screen, enter your user profile password.

    2. Press the Enter Key. This will take you directly to the Desktop.

    Regards


    Saturday, August 18, 2012 7:53 PM
  • Thanks for the information.
    Saturday, August 18, 2012 11:11 PM
  • There is 3rd party software that can be employed to restore many of the functions that have been removed - e.g., a Start button.  It's very good, and and it's even free.

      

      

    In my book I describe how to use ClassicShell and many other tweaks to make Windows 8 into a workhorse desktop-centric system, exactly as you describe.

    In practice it's possible to avoid ever visiting the Start Screen of the UI Formerly Known as Metro.

    Only thing it seems no one has figured out yet is how to restore Aero Glass and some halfway decent looking visual effects to the desktop.  It was just spiteful for Microsoft to remove that!

       

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options




    • Edited by Noel Carboni Sunday, August 19, 2012 2:41 AM corrected image to RTM version
    Sunday, August 19, 2012 2:31 AM
  • Thanks for the information Noel. I will have to look for your book. I will look at the add-on software options as well. I would love to see something like Gnome's Deskbar as an efficient Desktop-UI based search bar for the Windows key rather than either the legacy Start menu or the new Metro UI.

    Sunday, August 19, 2012 5:15 PM
  • There is 3rd party software that can be employed to restore many of the functions that have been removed - e.g., a Start button.  It's very good, and and it's even free.

      n practice it's possible to avoid ever visiting the Start Screen of the UI Formerly Known as Metro.

    Only thing it seems no one has figured out yet is how to restore Aero Glass and some halfway decent looking visual effects to the desktop.  It was just spiteful for Microsoft to remove that!

    I do not think that it was "spiteful" to remove Aero.  My guess is that the developers figured that they were losing too many cycles on this and what is really its utility in tablets?  None, as there are no overlapping windows or anything similar.  So, it became useless by the simple fact that Microsoft is moving Win8 in a different direction from the desktop.

    Furthermore, I believe that it is very dangerous to "tweak" Win8 in a corporate environment.  Such attempts can be made by a few enthusiasts knowing full well that the effect may not survive until the next patch Tuesday.  I would not advice anybody here considering Win8 for deployment even in small enterprise to depend on third party utilities. My guess is that further development will bypass those and these may not work with important packages (that do not anticipate the presence of such utilities) and they may cause more havoc than they are worth of.

    Thus caveat emptor.  My personal advice is that for those who want the desktop, there is the fully functional Win7+SP1 and the so-called minor "under the hood" improvements in Win8 are simply not worth the aggravation and the danger.  Since all development going forward would be directed almost exclusively to the "Metro/WinRT" part of the OS, incapacitating it would lead to more problems (as, I believe, Microsoft would be patching much of this component extensively over the next year).

    Sunday, August 19, 2012 11:06 PM
  • Sorry, but the only explanation for complete removal of Aero that makes sense is mine.

    Aero ran just fine on virtually every desktop.  And it could easily be disabled.  They could have just chosen to ship Windows 8 coming up with a Classic Windows 8 theme.  Problem solved.

    No, removing it was just more manipulation by Microsoft.  They used all the beta releases to "wean" people off of visual styles, with each one getting less and less pretty.

    Microsoft doesn't want the desktop to be comfortable at all.

    I see that you basically just don't want people to upgrade to Windows 8 rather than try to find ways to make it work for them, and I respect that, but there's no justifiable reason not to rely on well-written software like ClassicShell, for which even the source code is available.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Sunday, August 19, 2012 11:12 PM
  • I do not think that it was "spiteful" to remove Aero.  My guess is that the developers figured that they were losing too many cycles on this and what is really its utility in tablets?  None, as there are no overlapping windows or anything similar.  So, it became useless by the simple fact that Microsoft is moving Win8 in a different direction from the desktop.

    Furthermore, I believe that it is very dangerous to "tweak" Win8 in a corporate environment.  Such attempts can be made by a few enthusiasts knowing full well that the effect may not survive until the next patch Tuesday.  I would not advice anybody here considering Win8 for deployment even in small enterprise to depend on third party utilities. My guess is that further development will bypass those and these may not work with important packages (that do not anticipate the presence of such utilities) and they may cause more havoc than they are worth of.

    Thus caveat emptor.  My personal advice is that for those who want the desktop, there is the fully functional Win7+SP1 and the so-called minor "under the hood" improvements in Win8 are simply not worth the aggravation and the danger.  Since all development going forward would be directed almost exclusively to the "Metro/WinRT" part of the OS, incapacitating it would lead to more problems (as, I believe, Microsoft would be patching much of this component extensively over the next year).

    You again go around spreading FUD. You have your opinion but stick to the facts. There are no issue with deploying W8 into any corporate environment for there is no need for this or any other 3rd party application. W8 works just as well and in my opinion better than any previous version of Windows. There are no as you put it "dangers" into deploying W8 into any environment whether it be personal or corporate. This is your opinion and is not fact. 
    Sunday, August 19, 2012 11:13 PM

  • He was talking about using 3rd party workarounds in an enterprise environment, Bobby.



    Arf arf arf

    And there are no need for "workarounds". Workarounds for what? There is defiantly not any reason for fear of "danger" as he put it for installing it in any environment. Corporate or not.
    Monday, August 20, 2012 1:08 AM
  • Aero was simply a pretty thing on top of the Desktop Window Manager. The DWM is still used in Windows 8. It's just not all glass anymore. The current theme helps the disconnect between Metro and Desktop a bit more.
    Monday, August 20, 2012 2:13 AM
  • Aero was simply a pretty thing on top of the Desktop Window Manager. The DWM is still used in Windows 8. It's just not all glass anymore. The current theme helps the disconnect between Metro and Desktop a bit more.
    I agree with this.  The Start Screen is amazingly flat, the desktop had lots of eye candy.  It really made sense for Microsoft to get rid of Aero.  Microsoft really wants to "reimagine" Windows, as a portable OS that some users "enamored with change" will run on the desktop.
    Monday, August 20, 2012 3:42 AM
  • I feel you are very incorrect regarding cooperate usere. Here is a copy of my post.

     feel that Microsoft is making a huge mistake by not giving users the option of having a traditional desktop and start button in Windows8 like they are used to. I work IT for a very large British-US oil company and my wife works IT for a large aluminum comnpany and both companies have already decided against ever upgrading to Win8 due to this issue. The reasons are:

    1. We are not going to spend the money to retrain IT and our users how to navigate Win 8. Especially when we shouldn't have to. This would be a huge cost, besides the tousands of Win8 licenses. I have gotten very frustrated myself trying to navigate around Win8, so just think how frustrated the users will be. And this frustration will lead to lost time just doing our jobs.

    Microsoft needs to give the users the traditional desktop and start button ans application list back that they are used to. And give the users and IT the option to have the computer boot up to the traditional desktop rather than the metro desdtop. The metro desktopo may be great for phones, X-boxes, and tablets, but it is not suited for desktops or laptops.

    This also goes for my personal view. I have no desire to move from Windows 7 to 8 on my desktop unless we are given this option.

    just my 2 cents worth

    Tuesday, September 04, 2012 6:35 PM
  • I feel you are very incorrect regarding cooperate usere. Here is a copy of my post.

     feel that Microsoft is making a huge mistake by not giving users the option of having a traditional desktop and start button in Windows8 like they are used to. I work IT for a very large British-US oil company and my wife works IT for a large aluminum comnpany and both companies have already decided against ever upgrading to Win8 due to this issue. The reasons are:

    1. We are not going to spend the money to retrain IT and our users how to navigate Win 8. Especially when we shouldn't have to. This would be a huge cost, besides the tousands of Win8 licenses. I have gotten very frustrated myself trying to navigate around Win8, so just think how frustrated the users will be. And this frustration will lead to lost time just doing our jobs.

    Microsoft needs to give the users the traditional desktop and start button ans application list back that they are used to. And give the users and IT the option to have the computer boot up to the traditional desktop rather than the metro desdtop. The metro desktopo may be great for phones, X-boxes, and tablets, but it is not suited for desktops or laptops.

    This also goes for my personal view. I have no desire to move from Windows 7 to 8 on my desktop unless we are given this option.

    just my 2 cents worth

    From my own review of Windows 8 RTM, I have to wholeheartedly agree with husky 10101.  The average corporate user is just not going to get this, especially if I don't get it after having over 25 years of professional experience with Windows.

    While Windows, certainly, did need a better touchscreen interface, there's a huge, installed base of traditional PC users.   I think forcing Metro down everyone's throats is going to make the Vista performance debacle look like a minor mistake.  MS needs to give users the option of using a "classic" interface, and, fast.    The "Start" button has been part of Windows for, almost 20 years.

    Integrating the Start button with Metro almost seems like a throwback to Windows 3.1 when used with a desktop PC, and, with the worst characteristic of the Windows 3.1 interface, a busy desktop. 

    That said, I think Metro looks like a decent tablet/phone interface.   I owned one of the first Windows Mobile smartphones.  I also have tons of experience with Androids and iPhones.  I can't wait to use this on a tablet.   However, the tablet is not going to replace the traditional PC, anytime soon, for heavy duty commercial computing.

    I just firmly believe that desktop users need to be offered a choice between "Aero/Classic" and "Metro".  The fact that so many highly qualified IT professionals are trying to hack their way around Metro should be telling.


    Sean Toomey

    Wednesday, September 05, 2012 6:49 PM
  • "I just firmly believe that desktop users need to be offered a choice between 'Aero/Classic' and 'Metro'."  The annoying fact is: This would be a very simple task as the "legacy" desktop environment and its foundations still are the core of Windows 8, despite all the hype about the "modern" GUI and its (limited) foundations. But for some or another reason Microsoft is obviously unwilling to allow choices - a really weird decision, as professional desktop users will find their ways around it and the rest of the audience doesn't need to be forced into a GUI that provides everything they want.

    Understanding Windows is like understanding women.

    Wednesday, September 05, 2012 10:04 PM
  • "I just firmly believe that desktop users need to be offered a choice between 'Aero/Classic' and 'Metro'."  The annoying fact is: This would be a very simple task as the "legacy" desktop environment and its foundations still are the core of Windows 8, despite all the hype about the "modern" GUI and its (limited) foundations. But for some or another reason Microsoft is obviously unwilling to allow choices - a really weird decision, as professional desktop users will find their ways around it and the rest of the audience doesn't need to be forced into a GUI that provides everything they want.

    Understanding Windows is like understanding women.

    I think that the demand to have a choice between "Aero/Classic" and "Metro/Modern" is based on a fundamental misunderstanding of what Win8 actually is:  Win8 is a portable OS that runs the desktop (Aero/Classic) as a task! Metro/Modern is the GUI of the actual OS!!!  So, in fact, users here want Microsoft to incapacitate most of the OS!!  As users already have seen, the Start Screen is hardly it.  All the functions of the OS (such as "Control Panel" and others) are now going through the portable OS;there are no desktop equivalents of those utilities/controls anymore.  Microsoft only concession to the dual nature of this OS was to supply a "desktop" version of IE 10. This is all.  So, for Microsoft to offer a "choice", it would have to rework this whole OS. 

    Thus, those "dreaming" of a choice, or a service pack that would reset things simply do not understand the drastic nature of the changeThe "desktop" app is the only connection with past versions of "Windows" and even this is partially hobbled.  For those who think that by Win9 all will be well again: stop dreaming.  Win9 will go much further along the road of "Metrosization" than Win8.  In Win9, the "desktop" would even be more vestigial.

    Microsoft has no longer any use of the desktop; MS would not  be producing and supporting any more dedicated "desktop" OSes.  This is abundantly clear.  Only a commercial disaster (which would not happen) can avert this. 

    Thus, think what you want to do next.  If you feel that you are MS captives, do your peace with Metro, install Win8 and go along with the flow.  If not, stay with Win7 until a clear solution emerges.  If you want to combine things, go to Linux 3.3 (Mint is a good distribution) and run Win7 in VMware Desktop 8.0.  If gaming migrates to Linux and if Adobe releases its creative suite for this OS, one would have a very viable solution going forward.  Considering the fact that Apple is heavily into consumerization of its product line, I would not put any stock on OSX.

    The absurdity of it all is we now have a Windows version that does not do any windows natively, barely multitasks and it is optimized for small, touch-enabled, portable devices.....just when large, XD-resolution monitors are becoming the norm and we have i7s in desktops and laptops!!!!  What a hoot!!!

    Wednesday, September 05, 2012 11:08 PM
  • The annoying fact is: This would be a very simple task as the "legacy" desktop environment and its foundations still are the core of Windows 8, despite all the hype about the "modern" GUI and its (limited) foundations.

    Annoying is putting mildly. 

    It was painful to see good stuff being removed bit by bit in the various preview versions, and the elimination of any sense of desktop visual style whatsoever in the RTM was just evil of them. 

    And seeing the Metro interface being pulled out of someones behind and built up element by element without any obvious coherent design, all the while being told about studies and telemetry and whatever else they felt like making up...  That was sure something shy of fun.

    Maybe they actually think that by releasing Windows 8 previews where gradually things were shifted from reasonable to stupid that they "weaned" everyone off the need for real windows.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Thursday, September 06, 2012 2:50 AM
  • I think that the demand to have a choice between "Aero/Classic" and "Metro/Modern" is based on a fundamental misunderstanding of what Win8 actually is:  Win8 is a portable OS that runs the desktop (Aero/Classic) as a task! Metro/Modern is the GUI of the actual OS!!!  So, in fact, users here want Microsoft to incapacitate most of the OS!!  As users already have seen, the Start Screen is hardly it.  All the functions of the OS (such as "Control Panel" and others) are now going through the portable OS;there are no desktop equivalents of those utilities/controls anymore.  Microsoft only concession to the dual nature of this OS was to supply a "desktop" version of IE 10. This is all.  So, for Microsoft to offer a "choice", it would have to rework this whole OS. 

    Um, it's not clear whether you're talking "technically" or "conceptually" here, ADRz, but some of what you've said doesn't match what I'm seeing.

    Yes, the desktop is started by clicking a tile in the UI Formerly Known as Metro, but it's not running as some kind of special task - stuff still runs on the kernel we knew and loved, which actually seems surprisingly untouched underneath it all.  Who knows, maybe that's because the hard core OS people have left in disgust (which is the really scary part in all this).  And there are still desktop control panels for everything that's controllable, as far as I can see.  That may be Microsoft's concession to having to have their own developers use the OS, and make the next version with it.

    While I agree that you've correctly assessed Microsoft's direction as clearly wanting everyone to move wholesale off desktop use, and I share your disgust with the idea, maybe you might want to stay away from making clearly incorrect technical exclamations.

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Thursday, September 06, 2012 3:02 AM
  • Um, it's not clear whether you're talking "technically" or "conceptually" here, ADRz, but some of what you've said doesn't match what I'm seeing.

    Yes, the desktop is started by clicking a tile in the UI Formerly Known as Metro, but it's not running as some kind of special task - stuff still runs on the kernel we knew and loved, which actually seems surprisingly untouched underneath it all.  Who knows, maybe that's because the hard core OS people have left in disgust (which is the really scary part in all this).  And there are still desktop control panels for everything that's controllable, as far as I can see.  That may be Microsoft's concession to having to have their own developers use the OS, and make the next version with it.



    Noel,

    I do not think that Microsoft has provided detailed information on the architecture of Win8.  There are several models flying about.  Here is one of them:

    I am not sure that it is correct, it is mostly conjecture.  There are others, of course.

    In all cases, it does not really matter if the kernel is preserved or not.  The WinRT/Metro/Modern part of the architecture is significant and Microsoft is not about to obliterate it.  If you actually believe that the 2nd diagram is correct, then my opinion seems well rooted into reality.  Unless there is an official version of architecture (if you have it, please post it), the view that assigns a substantial element to the portable OS (whatever its name is) is rather correct.  As usual, I am more than happy to be corrected if some of my statements are not true.  As you can see, in the 2nd diagram, OS services are provided by the "Metro" component.  Well, if you have the definitive structure, I would be glad to see it.

    Thursday, September 06, 2012 3:35 AM
  • We can only know what's under the covers by observation (assuming one is not an insider).

    I have observed, by the way the desktop apps work, that not much if anything in the run-time environment for desktop apps has changed.  This is also supported by the evolution we saw in the development preview versions.  It's not hard to see - virtually everything that ran under Windows 7 runs under Windows 8 today without trouble.  That says all they've changed on the desktop side is window dressing (and that for the worse).

    It's also pretty clear, poking around Task Manager and seeing what processes are running, that there's not really a fundamental difference in what's running.  There's actually just a lot LESS of it, which is not a bad thing in itself.

    I once thought maybe differences seen from DPC performance measuring tools between Windows 7 and 8 indicated there could be a new layer (virtualization?) in place, but those differences just turned out to be a result of the system taking over the high speed timer.

    I interpret the "Windows Kernel Services" box in the diagram you posted as "that which has always been there".

    Since you don't know how the kernel, et. al. have (or haven't) changed, I suggest that statements like "Win8 is a portable OS that runs the desktop (Aero/Classic) as a task!" are technically unfounded, even if it looks that way on the UI (i.e., the desktop is just another box to start on the Metro start screen). 

    I really hate to argue semantics, but I just think your message will be better heard and received if you don't make statements that could be said to be dead wrong technically.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    • Edited by Noel Carboni Thursday, September 06, 2012 11:01 AM
    Thursday, September 06, 2012 10:43 AM
  • I tried the Stardock 8 utility at the following URL: http://www.stardock.com/products/start8/

    It seems to work well, although I don't think I would be leery about using a third party patch in a production deployment.

    So, if you really want to avoid Metro in the RTM release, move the Desktop Tile to the Number 1 position (Top Row/First Column), install the Stardock utility, then reboot.   It will boot to a normal Windows desktop, complete with a Start button.

    The performance seems much better than my Windows 7 VMs.   I would deploy Windows 8 in a heartbeat if they brought back the Start button, natively.


    Sean Toomey

    Thursday, September 06, 2012 6:12 PM
  • We can only know what's under the covers by observation (assuming one is not an insider).

    I have observed, by the way the desktop apps work, that not much if anything in the run-time environment for desktop apps has changed.  This is also supported by the evolution we saw in the development preview versions.  It's not hard to see - virtually everything that ran under Windows 7 runs under Windows 8 today without trouble.  That says all they've changed on the desktop side is window dressing (and that for the worse).

    It's also pretty clear, poking around Task Manager and seeing what processes are running, that there's not really a fundamental difference in what's running.  There's actually just a lot LESS of it, which is not a bad thing in itself.

    I once thought maybe differences seen from DPC performance measuring tools between Windows 7 and 8 indicated there could be a new layer (virtualization?) in place, but those differences just turned out to be a result of the system taking over the high speed timer.

    I interpret the "Windows Kernel Services" box in the diagram you posted as "that which has always been there".

    Since you don't know how the kernel, et. al. have (or haven't) changed, I suggest that statements like "Win8 is a portable OS that runs the desktop (Aero/Classic) as a task!" are technically unfounded, even if it looks that way on the UI (i.e., the desktop is just another box to start on the Metro start screen). 

    I really hate to argue semantics, but I just think your message will be better heard and received if you don't make statements that could be said to be dead wrong technically.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Noel, we have to agree to disagree on this one.  As I pointed out, Microsoft has not provided a full architecture map of Win8 and most of us are interpreting what we think the behavior of the OS is.  If the schematic that I posted is correct (and it is a big if), then the OS services are provided by the "portable" Application Model (however they appear) and, then, indeed, the desktop is just a task (independently of the fact that you can get to it directly through 3rd party utilities).  I think that the way Microsoft has limited access to the desktop in Windows RT (the ARM-directed version of Win8) points to that (unless, of course, you believe that the code for Windows RT is all brand new...I would bet against that).  Sure, I may be wrong, but time and further investigation would tell.  That huge chunks of earlier code are present that allow certain utilities to access the desktop directly does not argue against this thesis.  It is more than likely that this code would be progressively eliminated and these utilities would stop working.  I 'd bet that progressively Microsoft would be working its way to do just that.  If sales of Win8 are robust, expect Microsoft to progressively limit access to the desktop.  Would it eliminate completely?  Unlikely, until Win10.  My bet aqain is that Win9 will still sport a vestigial desktop.  Now, if Win8 bombs, Microsoft is not going to remove access to the work-arounds but this remains to be seen.  Thank you for your comments.
    Thursday, September 06, 2012 11:32 PM
  • I tried the Stardock 8 utility at the following URL: http://www.stardock.com/products/start8/

    It seems to work well, although I don't think I would be leery about using a third party patch in a production deployment.

    So, if you really want to avoid Metro in the RTM release, move the Desktop Tile to the Number 1 position (Top Row/First Column), install the Stardock utility, then reboot.   It will boot to a normal Windows desktop, complete with a Start button.

    The performance seems much better than my Windows 7 VMs.   I would deploy Windows 8 in a heartbeat if they brought back the Start button, natively.


    Sean Toomey

    Sean,  this is highly unlikely.  Microsoft's whole strategy is based on forcing users to go through the "Metro/Modern" Start Screen.  You may see a change in strategy if Win8 bombs. 

    Today, I watched the Amazon release of the Kindle Fire HD.  It is simply amazing that Amazon can sell a 16 GB 7-inch Kindle Fire HD with all that tech for $199. It has managed to even beat the pricing of Nexus 7!!! It would sell the 9''-inch variant for $299!!! .  Apple is expected to release a 7''-inch iPad Mini priced probably at $299.  Personally, I would not buy a "closed" device (I have the Nexus 7),  but I really wonder how Microsoft intends to make any impact in this market with tablets that have such a poor ecosystem and a very immature OS.  Apparently, the only way MS has devised includes turning all desktops into giant tablets (thus, tens of millions of users!!!).  It is sad, really sad, when a corporation needs to do this.

    Thursday, September 06, 2012 11:41 PM
  • if Win8 bombs

    If?

    Wait until unsuspecting and well meaning users who haven't done much research on what they're buying try to apply it to their computers, blindly following the "I like to keep current" philosophy.  Maybe those who have my book might be able to scrape by, but I feel sorry for the rest.  The plain and simple truth is that the functionality is reduced from the last 3 or 4 Windows versions.  It's not hidden, it's not deconfigured.  It's been deleted.

    There's a reason they're pricing the upgrade at only $39.95 (as if "up" has meaning in this context).

    Well, two reasons really, but the important one is that Microsoft clearly realizes that they have added essentially no value for desktop users.  I wouldn't have even used the word "essentially" except that there may actually be computers on which Windows 8 will run that wouldn't handle Vista or Windows 7.  But who designs software for ancient hardware?  Given Microsoft's past record of actually improving each new version of their software, it will be hard for people to believe what's happening.  Maybe they'll think they just haven't yet figured out how to get to all the good new stuff.

    The second reason is that Microsoft hopes to pay back that "giveaway" price by selling thousands of dollars worth of apps in their app store to those folks who DO buy it.

    Who knows, maybe a substantial portion of the public "buy first and ask questions later".  I'd hate to be manning the high tech store returns desk the day after this turkey hits the shelves.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Friday, September 07, 2012 2:30 PM
  • Hey Metro UI is not that annoying however if you want to delete that then you can use some tweaks but remember there is no roll back once you are done with that, neither Microsoft support that here we have 2 third party software that can help to remove Metro UI for you 

    http://www.technology-howto.com/2012/10/Remove-Metro-UI-From-Windows-8.html

    Please reply if you have any question


    • Edited by amar3383 Monday, November 12, 2012 5:21 AM
    Sunday, October 21, 2012 3:11 PM
  • Hey Ronnie,

    There are some tweaks available on the internet to get your windows 7 look in windows 8 that removes Metro UI

    Please go through this link and suggest me if I could add and remove something

    http://www.technology-howto.com/2012/10/Remove-Metro-UI-From-Windows-8.html

    Thanks


    • Edited by amar3383 Monday, November 12, 2012 5:21 AM
    Sunday, October 21, 2012 3:14 PM
  • Hey Metro UI is not that annoying however if you want to delete that then you can use some tweaks but remember there is no roll back once you are done with that, neither Microsoft support that here we have 2 third party software that can help to remove Metro UI for you 

    http://www.technology-howto.com/2012/10/Remove-Metro-UI-From-Windows-8.html

    Please reply if you have any question

    If one wants to use just the desktop of Win8, why not stay with Win7???  What would be served by installing Win8, apply all the tweaks and have a Win7-like environment???  It seems non-sensical, considering that even after all that, there is still lower functionality than in Win7.

    The only reason to buy Win8 is to have access to the Metro apps.  If you want your computer to act like a big smartphone, be my guest.

    Sunday, October 21, 2012 3:43 PM
  • after all that, there is still lower functionality than in Win7.

    Lower than you'd think at first glance, actually.

    I've researched it thoroughly - even with all the secret and not so secret "To Work" options enabled, it's actually less functional than Windows 7.

    This makes no sense from pretty much any viewpoint...  Microsoft already had a highly functional desktop.  They worked extra hard to hobble it in Windows 8.  They even had configuration options with which it could have been deconfigured but no, they had to go out of their way to actually DELETE the code.

    I guess it must be because disk drives and flash memory keep getting more expensive and CPUs/GPUs are getting slower.  Yes, that's it.

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Monday, October 22, 2012 1:08 AM
  • Windows 8.1 has the option to boot to desktop directly
    Monday, October 21, 2013 5:42 PM