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Vista Home Basic 32 to Windows 7 64

    Question

  • I'm aware that I have to install a clean version of Windows 7 if i'm going from 32bit to 64bit, and I'm fine with that. However because I'm currently running a 32 bit OS and want to move to a 64bit do I have to pay the price for the full program and not the upgrade price? Thanks for  the help.
    Sunday, October 04, 2009 4:19 PM

Answers

All replies

  • Hi, Go to this link it will answer your question.

    http://mossblog.allthingsd.com/files/2009/08/windows-upgrade-chart.png

    Slan go foill, Paul
    Sunday, October 04, 2009 6:34 PM
  • Thank you for the response however my question is about the price I will need to pay. For a "clean install" do I have to pay the full price of the program? Or can I still pay the upgrade price and just completely re-install the OS because I already own a copy of vista?
    Sunday, October 04, 2009 10:27 PM
  • Thank you for the response however my question is about the price I will need to pay. For a "clean install" do I have to pay the full price of the program? Or can I still pay the upgrade price and just completely re-install the OS because I already own a copy of vista?

    You can confidently purchase an Upgrade pack and still be able to perform a 'clean install'.

    However, be aware that the process and meaning of 'clean install' has changed from what it was for Windows XP and earlier versions.  It nowadays does NOT mean completely wiping the drive or starting with a new, empty drive.  The Full package product can install directly on a new and empty drive.  For a 'clan install' with an upgrade pack you need first have the older, qualifying product installed.


    To install 'clean' with an upgrade pack you select the 'custom' install option rather than the 'upgrade' install option.  Then you select the drive or partition where you want the install to go.   There is no need whatsoever to 'format' the drive or partition first.  If you choose the partition where your 'qualifying' install is currently located, that older install will be bundled into a WINDOWS.OLD folder, and become unavailable for use.  A clean, fresh install of the new OS version will be placed on the remaining drive space, and will in no way whatsoever be compromised by the now quarantined older install.

    It's best to wait a while before removing the WINDOWS.OLD folder.  You can recover any overlooked stuff from there if need be.  (It's not uncommon, for example, for people to overlook stuff like email backups etc, and have to recover them from inside the old 'Users' or 'Documents and Settings' folder.  When you are sure that you no longer need anything in there, you can remove the WINDOWS.OLD folder by choosing the 'Previous Windows Versions' option in the Disk Cleanup tool.

    There's also no need to worry about drive fragmenbtation resulting from the presence and then removal of that WINDOWS.OLD folder.  Default settings of Vista and Windows 7 have defrag scheduled as a low priority regular background task.  Left as is, Vista and Windows 7 will have your drives remaining unfragmented to a perfectly adequate extent.



    The process is now called a 'custom clean' install.  It is every bit as 'safe' and reliable as the older procedure we saw for XP and earlier.
    • Proposed as answer by Techwrighter Monday, October 05, 2009 12:41 AM
    Monday, October 05, 2009 12:41 AM
  • Thank you very much for the help!
    • Proposed as answer by BUMPER4U Monday, October 12, 2009 1:25 PM
    Monday, October 05, 2009 10:41 PM