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\Boot\BCD error

    Question

  •  

    Hi

    I am getting this message after a crash on my computer.  To be precise:

    File: \Boot\Bcd

    Status: 0xc000000f

    Info: An error occurred while attempting to read the boot configuration data.

    It appears when I boot up, no blue screen, just black and then this.  I can avoid it by placing the Vista disc in my DVD drive and then not hitting a key to boot from CD, but if the disc isn't in the drive, I get this error.  It's a new computer, I've been adding programs, and it all seemed to be going ok then the system froze in the middle of reading an email.  I eventually hit reset and that's when the problem started.  I've tried fixing it by booting from the disk and using the 'repair' function, but it doesn't detect any error.

     

    Any suggestions?

     

    Saturday, January 19, 2008 6:03 AM

Answers

  •  

    Hi Annie,

     

    Thank you for the reply.

     

    First please help confirm the following two points:

     

    1.    When did the issue begin to occur?

    2.    Have any changes been made on the computer recently, such as an installation or upgrade?

    3.    Running or installing what product caused the system to crash?

     

    Based on the current situation, I suggest trying the following steps to troubleshoot the issue.

     

    Method 1: Startup Repair from the Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE)

    ============================================

    1. Insert the Windows Vista installation disc into the disc drive, and then start the computer. 

    2. Press a key when the message indicating "Press any key to boot from CD or DVD …". appears.

    3. Select a language, a time and currency, and a keyboard or input method, and then click Next. 

    4. Click Repair your computer. 

    5. In the System Recovery Options dialog box, choose the drive of your Windows installation and click Next. 

    6. At the System Recovery Options Dialog Box, click on Repair your computer.

    7. Click the operating system that you want to repair, and then click Next.

    8. In the System Recovery Options dialog box, click Startup Repair.

     

    Method 2: Rebuild BCD

    ============================================

    1. Put the Windows Vista installation disc in the disc drive, and then start the computer. 

    2. Press a key when the message indicating "Press any key to boot from CD or DVD …". appears.

    3. Select a language, a time, a currency, and a keyboard or another input method, and then click Next. 

    4. Click Repair your computer. 

    5. Click the operating system that you want to repair, and then click Next. 

    6. In the System Recovery Options dialog box, click Command Prompt. 

    7. Type BOOTREC /FIXMBR, and then press ENTER. 

    8. Type BOOTREC /FIXBOOT, and then press ENTER. 

    9. Type BOOTREC /REBUILDBCD, and then press ENTER. 

     

    Method 3: Use the Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) to run System Restore

    ============================================

    1. Insert the Windows Vista installation disc into the disc drive, and then start the computer. 

    2. Press a key when the message indicating "Press any key to boot from CD or DVD …". appears.

    3. Select a language, a time and currency, and a keyboard or input method, and then click Next. 

    4. Click Repair your computer. 

    5. In the System Recovery Options dialog box, choose the drive of your Windows installation and click Next 

    6. At the System Recovery Options Dialog Box, click on System Restore.

    7. Follow the System Restore Wizard instruction as usual and choose the appropriate restore point.

    8. Click Finish to restore the system.

     

    Hope it helps.

     

    Best regards,

    Tim Quan

    Microsoft Online Community Support

     

    Monday, January 21, 2008 5:47 AM
  • I fixed it but still don't know what caused it -- therefore don't know how to avoid it again.  I detached two drives and sure enough, the third drive had the OS on it, so it got assigned "C."  Then the Vista Repair disk immediately found a "problem" and offered to repair it.  It did ... then I plugged the other drives back in and everything was back to normal.

    Very odd and a little troubling ... especially if the OS hadn't been in the first partition.
    Monday, January 28, 2008 10:54 PM

All replies

  •  

    Hi Annie,

     

    Thank you for the reply.

     

    First please help confirm the following two points:

     

    1.    When did the issue begin to occur?

    2.    Have any changes been made on the computer recently, such as an installation or upgrade?

    3.    Running or installing what product caused the system to crash?

     

    Based on the current situation, I suggest trying the following steps to troubleshoot the issue.

     

    Method 1: Startup Repair from the Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE)

    ============================================

    1. Insert the Windows Vista installation disc into the disc drive, and then start the computer. 

    2. Press a key when the message indicating "Press any key to boot from CD or DVD …". appears.

    3. Select a language, a time and currency, and a keyboard or input method, and then click Next. 

    4. Click Repair your computer. 

    5. In the System Recovery Options dialog box, choose the drive of your Windows installation and click Next. 

    6. At the System Recovery Options Dialog Box, click on Repair your computer.

    7. Click the operating system that you want to repair, and then click Next.

    8. In the System Recovery Options dialog box, click Startup Repair.

     

    Method 2: Rebuild BCD

    ============================================

    1. Put the Windows Vista installation disc in the disc drive, and then start the computer. 

    2. Press a key when the message indicating "Press any key to boot from CD or DVD …". appears.

    3. Select a language, a time, a currency, and a keyboard or another input method, and then click Next. 

    4. Click Repair your computer. 

    5. Click the operating system that you want to repair, and then click Next. 

    6. In the System Recovery Options dialog box, click Command Prompt. 

    7. Type BOOTREC /FIXMBR, and then press ENTER. 

    8. Type BOOTREC /FIXBOOT, and then press ENTER. 

    9. Type BOOTREC /REBUILDBCD, and then press ENTER. 

     

    Method 3: Use the Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) to run System Restore

    ============================================

    1. Insert the Windows Vista installation disc into the disc drive, and then start the computer. 

    2. Press a key when the message indicating "Press any key to boot from CD or DVD …". appears.

    3. Select a language, a time and currency, and a keyboard or input method, and then click Next. 

    4. Click Repair your computer. 

    5. In the System Recovery Options dialog box, choose the drive of your Windows installation and click Next 

    6. At the System Recovery Options Dialog Box, click on System Restore.

    7. Follow the System Restore Wizard instruction as usual and choose the appropriate restore point.

    8. Click Finish to restore the system.

     

    Hope it helps.

     

    Best regards,

    Tim Quan

    Microsoft Online Community Support

     

    Monday, January 21, 2008 5:47 AM
  • I have the same problem.  The solution doesn't work because there is no operating system listed in the System Recovery Options Box ... load drivers doesn't work because no drivers are available ... and the Choose A Recovery Tool page starts by saying "Operating system: Unknown on (Unknown) Local Disk."

    Here's an oddity.  The system has somehow switched all my drive assignments.  Windows, installed on C, is now listed on E.  A data drive (which used to be E) is now C.  Former D is now F.  Former F is now D.  (Three physical drives.  Unfortunately, I canm't remember which two are on a single drive.)  All my drive labels are correct and the files in them seem intact.  (I found all this out by searching for drivers.)

    So the question for me probably is: How to I restore my drive assignments?
    Monday, January 28, 2008 9:55 PM
  • I fixed it but still don't know what caused it -- therefore don't know how to avoid it again.  I detached two drives and sure enough, the third drive had the OS on it, so it got assigned "C."  Then the Vista Repair disk immediately found a "problem" and offered to repair it.  It did ... then I plugged the other drives back in and everything was back to normal.

    Very odd and a little troubling ... especially if the OS hadn't been in the first partition.
    Monday, January 28, 2008 10:54 PM
  • I had the exact same thing happen to me.  After I unplugged the other drives, restarted, and booted from the setup disk, Vista automatically fixed the problem.

    Friday, February 01, 2008 6:55 PM
  •  bob-k_ wrote:
    I have the same problem.  The solution doesn't work because there is no operating system listed in the System Recovery Options Box ... load drivers doesn't work because no drivers are available ... and the Choose A Recovery Tool page starts by saying "Operating system: Unknown on (Unknown) Local Disk."

    Here's an oddity.  The system has somehow switched all my drive assignments.  Windows, installed on C, is now listed on E.  A data drive (which used to be E) is now C.  Former D is now F.  Former F is now D.  (Three physical drives.  Unfortunately, I canm't remember which two are on a single drive.)  All my drive labels are correct and the files in them seem intact.  (I found all this out by searching for drivers.)

    So the question for me probably is: How to I restore my drive assignments?


    Where are the drivers for my harddrive located?  I have the same problem of Vista not being able to locate the drivers, so I need to locate them manually, right?  So, where can they be found so I can continue restoring my computer?
    Saturday, February 02, 2008 9:17 PM
  •  

     

    Method 2: Rebuild BCD

    ============================================

    1. Put the Windows Vista installation disc in the disc drive, and then start the computer. 

    2. Press a key when the message indicating "Press any key to boot from CD or DVD …". appears.

    3. Select a language, a time, a currency, and a keyboard or another input method, and then click Next. 

    4. Click Repair your computer. 

    5. Click the operating system that you want to repair, and then click Next. 

    6. In the System Recovery Options dialog box, click Command Prompt. 

    7. Type BOOTREC /FIXMBR, and then press ENTER. 

    8. Type BOOTREC /FIXBOOT, and then press ENTER. 

    9. Type BOOTREC /REBUILDBCD, and then press ENTER. 

     

     

    Best regards,

    Tim Quan

    Microsoft Online Community Support

     

     

    hello

     

    I have a similar problem.

    I have installed vista ultimate 64 on my new computer three day ago. Everything was fine. I installed some programs and stuff and then restart the computer. When it was starting this error message came up:

     

    File: \Boot\Bcd                        

    Status: 0xc000000f

    Info: An error occurred while attempting to read the boot configuration data.

     

    Im able to fix this problem by inserting my vista dvd and the system recognize and fix the problem by himself. Then vista works for some time. Let say when I restart it again the 4th or 5th time (depends) The error pops up again! It is very annoying!

     

    I tried your method 2 (above) and on the command rebuildbcd I got the message that no os is installed on the disk!

     

    Also when I start the program Vistaboot Pro it shows this message:

     

    VistaBootPro has detected that Vista is either not installed or is

    installed on a hidden drive. You may experience minor problems using
    VistaBootPRO and/ or making changes to your BCD Registry.

     

    Dont know if this have anything to do with my problem?

     

    What is wrong?

    Could this be a hardware problem?

    What can I do?

     


     

    Thursday, November 06, 2008 4:45 PM
  • does anyone know how to fix it without the disk.  i bought the laptop and it came with vista already installed.  i don't think i have the disks.  is there anyway possible to do so without the disks? if so please help

    Sunday, November 09, 2008 9:13 PM
  • http://neosmart.net/wiki/display/EBCD/Recovering+the+Vista+Bootloader+from+the+DVD

    gl/hf Wink
    Tuesday, November 11, 2008 1:51 PM
  • I have a similar problem.

    I have installed Vista Home Premium on a pc that is about 16 months old. When it starts i receive the following:

     

    File: \Boot\Bcd                        

    Status: 0xc000000f

    Info: An error occurred while attempting to read the boot configuration data.

     

    When I try method two bootrec.exe does not find my Vista installation.

     

    When running bootrec /rebuildbcd i recieve the following

     

    ________________________________________________________

     

    X:\sources>bootrec /rebuildbcd

    Scanning all disks for Windows installations.

     

    Please wait, since this may take a while....

    Successfully scanned windows installations.

    Total identified Windows installations: 0

    The operation completed successfully.

     

    ________________________________________________________

     

    Is this normal?

    Wednesday, December 03, 2008 8:37 PM
  • I am having similar problems. For the past few weeks, my computer would shut down very soon after boot up but evetually would work just fine so last night I decided to do a system restore thinking I may have changed something that shouldn't have been changed.  During the system restore the computer shut down again and brought me to a screen that said Insert Windows Installation Disk, run repair, etc... File: /boot/bcd error.  Well I didn't have the disks since I bought a pre-made computer so I put in the Recovery CD and nothing, it kept bringing me back to the same screen. At this point I went out and bought a brand new version of Windows Vista Ultimate thinking I would just overwrite everything and start fresh, well putting in that CD brought us back to the exact same screen and yes, we were booting from the CDROM. 

    We thought maybe something was corrupted on the harddrive so we bought a new harddrive... new screen, but now a new problem, great! Now it says to boot from a bootable device as if its not reading the CDROM. 

    My question is, is the /boot/bcd file a motherboard issue or a harddrive issue or memory or etc?  I would assume since I can get to the BIOS and Boot sequence menus and its running a memory check on boot up that the motherboard is fine but before I basically went out and bought all new parts to find the solution I would ask what would cause this issue to begin with? Please help!

    Friday, April 03, 2009 7:21 PM
  • Everyone is asking the same question, but are NOT getting the answers they want to hear. What is causing this to happen?? We got the answer to basicly to reboot the system. How we avoid the "\boot\bcd" screen again??  
    • Proposed as answer by dbeachy1 Saturday, September 19, 2009 8:15 PM
    • Unproposed as answer by dbeachy1 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 2:34 AM
    Sunday, August 23, 2009 3:13 PM
  • In my case (Windows 7), the root cause was that the BCD file was moved (by defragmentation perhaps???) to an area on the boot disk beyond sector 2,147,483,648 (the maximum 32-bit signed value), and Windows couldn't access it at boot time (that's the "a requested device is inaccessible" error).  In my case at least, the solution was to force the data for C:\Boot\BCD to reside on a sector within the two-billion-sector boot-time limit:

    1. Boot into Windows recovery mode and bring up a command prompt (SHIFT-F10 is the shortcut key).
    2. cd \Boot
    3. If you tried startup repair already (which I'm sure you did), your original BCD file was renamed to BCD.Backup.0001.  In my case, the data in BCD file was still perfectly fine -- it just needed to be accessible by the Windows loader (i.e., within the boot-time sector limit).  What you want to do is locate an existing file that was installed at boot time, and therefore is certainly within the two-billion-sector limit, *AND* has enough space to contain the BCD data: 32K or greater in size.  I chose to use memtest.exe, so that's what I'll describe below.
    4. Make a copy of your original memtest.exe: copy memtest.exe memtest.exe.org.
    5. Copy your renamed BCD file to memtest.exe: copy BCD.Backup.0001 memtest.exe. Windows will reuse the existing sectors in the destination file if it can, and since memtest.exe is larger than 32K (the size of BCD), the entire BCD file will fit in memtest.exe's original sector space.
    6. Rename memtest.exe to BCD. 
    7. Now rename memtest.exe.org memtest.exe.  What you have done in effect is move memtest.exe to another area on the disk and use memtest.exe's original sectors (which are inside the boot-time sector limit) to hold your BCD file.
    8. Now ALT-TAB back to the repair options GUI and run startup repair again (you may not need to do this if your original BCD data is still OK, but I did it anyway); the repair step should work this time and the system should reboot.
    9. The system should boot normally now!  :)

    That worked for me, and I was about at my wit's end!  That's a nasty bug that Windows should fix -- it should "lock" the boot-time files and not allow them to be moved beyond the two-billion-sector-limit accessible the boot subsystem.

    One final note: whichever file you choose to reuse (memtest.exe in my case) will end up being moved to a different sector range, which will quite possibly be beyond the boot-time sector limit.  If that happens, memtest.exe would not be accessible by the boot subsystem (just like BCD was not).  So you may want to pick a different file to reuse, but whatever file you choose must already reside within the first two billion sectors on the disk and be >= 32K in size.

    The real fix is that Windows should lock the boot-time files to be within the two-billion-sector limit so that the loader can always access them!  This is a really nasty bug.  I'm just glad to have my system back!

    • Edited by dbeachy1 Thursday, February 25, 2010 8:44 PM Added missing step 6.
    • Proposed as answer by Pcbuddyuk Wednesday, November 03, 2010 12:00 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by Carey FrischMVP, Moderator Saturday, August 27, 2011 10:52 PM
    Saturday, September 19, 2009 8:17 PM
  • I have a similar problem.

    I have attempted to install Vista business 32  on a HP DV6426 laptop after 8 failures with upgrades to home premium SP1.  When I reboot the system

     

    File: \Boot\Bcd                        

    Status: 0xc000000f

    Info: An error occurred while attempting to read the boot configuration data.  appears

    Now what?


    Is it poosible to wipe the HD clean and start over?  If so, how?

    Thanks, JC

    Tuesday, September 22, 2009 9:06 PM
  • Found the problem.  There was a directory with OS files that I was unaware of. Did a format at the command prompt, then Vista installed.
    Tuesday, September 22, 2009 10:53 PM
  • what happens if i dont got my cd to boot back the setup i only have a utility cd which let me open a program to at least get e mail and try to get some help with out it i would not have no internet connection so if u can help maybe i need to fix a sector or something please get back to me as sooon as possible i would like to get this resolved with out a cd ....
    Monday, October 26, 2009 5:42 PM
  • Tim...you are a genius!!!! #2 worked out perfectly for me. You just saved me from a major beating by my father. I was using acronis os selector(that is supposed to have vista compatability...I mean for 699 bucks I should sue them for false advertising. But back to the point) acronis wasn't detecting vista on boot so I disabled it and was unable to boot vista. I had tried to boot startup repair on my dell's recovery partition but the recovery partition wouldn't boot by pressing f8 at the bios. I was worried about all of my files and the state of my 1000 dollar laptop...then I came across this website on my blackberry and tried #2 out...and boy was I glad I did. After those commands windows booted right up! I was on the ground praying to god to thank him on my knees for finding this page. I have bookmarked this page and also have made a big homescreen link on my blackberry in case I ever need It again. Thank you so much for your help!!! -Thomas Anthony Fabrizio- -TAFProjects-
    Thursday, October 29, 2009 2:47 AM
  • I got almost the same problem

    i got vista and it says \boot\bcd
    0xc00000e9
    i/o error

    and i cant find my harddrive

    can you help

    Thursday, November 05, 2009 1:56 PM
  • what if you dont have a that boot disk??

    i have vista 32bit and that same File:Boot/BCD problem or whatever also appeared...

    ive tried downloading a boot disk from:...
    http://neosmart.net/wiki/display/EBCD/Recovering+the+Vista+Bootloader+from+the+DVD
    gl/hf
    - but the link dsnt even exist...

    i would very much apreciate your help...thxx
    Friday, November 06, 2009 7:14 PM
  • Hi Tim
    Thanks for that help,
    Just wondering about number 2 to fix this issue.
    If I do this, will I lose any data? Thanks,
    Bens_Dream

    EDIT:

    I start my laptop up using F11 repeatedly on the startup screen (Purple Packard Bell screen). Will I lose any data since getting this error when I finally boot up my laptop normally?
    Thanks again.
    Monday, November 09, 2009 2:42 PM
  • Wow . . .Great help.  I had replaced a Hard Drive on my Tohiba laptop (was a 200 gig, now a 320 gig) and I did not realize that this would not work.  I used the recover DVD's supplied and everything was OK until I tried to install SP1 for Vista . . .and the trouble started.  Microsoft support took me through the system update readiness tool which fixed some of the errors, but I had the BCD 00xc000000f Boot selection failed because a required device is inacessibile error. 

    Finally Microsoft through in the towel saying I needed an oriional Vista Retail DVD to resolve the issues.

    Using this description as a guide, I did the following:


    1. Boot into Windows recovery mode and bring up a command prompt
    2. cd \Boot
    3. If Copied the original BCD file  to BCD.Backup.0001. 
    4. Make a copy of your original memtest.exe: copy memtest.exe memtest.exe.org.
    5. Copy the renamed BCD file to memtest.exe: copy BCD.Backup.0001 memtest.exe.
    6. Rename memtest.exe to BCD after deleting the origional BCD. 
    7. Now rename memtest.exe.org memtest.exe. 
    8. Now Exit back to the repair options GUI and run startup repair again (you may not need to do this if your original BCD data is still OK, but I did it anyway); the repair step should work this time and the system should reboot.

    SP1, after reboot continued from Stage 2 to 3 then 1 through 3 again.  All appears to be fine!
    Thursday, March 11, 2010 9:46 PM
  • Hi folks.

     

    I had a BCD error here this morning on one of the machines I built. I couldn't tell you what the cause of the error is. Standard protocol for myself is to build the machine, install drivers, fully update the machine from the "updates server" we have here on site, then install the specified software that the customer has asked for. When I had done all this, all except one bit of software i was waiting to come into stock, finished and shut the machine down it was working fine. I went to boot it up this morning and I got thee error- 

    BCD 00xc000000f Boot selection failed because a required device is inacessibile error. 

    I proceeded to fix this by inserting the Windows 7 installation CD to get into the recovery environment, but upon "Windows is loading file," at about 80% loaded there was graphical tearing on the screen this forced a reboot. Again I tried to get into the recovery environment and upon loading the files it crashed.

    To get around this, upon boot I pressed F8 to get the Advanced Boot Options menu and selected Boot in Safe mode with command prompt, as I was going to try force a BCD fix, but got the Windows 7 OOBE instead. After selecting the language and repair computer the a scan came up and reported that there was a 'problem with my computer' and would I like to continue with repairs. I accepted and within 5 minutes I was back in Windows.

     

    Tuesday, March 23, 2010 10:04 AM
  • nobody answered the question?

     

    why is it happening continously. You know how to fix it, you know that a device driver, new hardware has possible issues but you also still failed to respond to people that didnt make changes.

    so why is this happening?

    Saturday, April 24, 2010 3:06 PM
  • I have searched high and low for an answer to this and all you get is the same stupid answers, we all know how to fix the problem but still no solution to stop it happening again and agian (which seems to be everytime windows updates).  Lots of people having this problem and no solution being offered.  Really annoying this!
    Monday, April 26, 2010 11:35 AM
  • Tim - looks like many folks are suffering from this whole boot\bcd thing.  my problem is that i have tried all the standard methods to repair the bcd with no avail.  running server 2008 std on a dell t300 which recently had the mb/ps/raid replaced by dell when the server started randomly rebooting.  after the hardware replace - exact replacements - the boot error started.  please help

    alt e-mail lrgentile@comcast.net

    Friday, May 28, 2010 2:55 PM
  • Wow . . .Great help.  I had replaced a Hard Drive on my Tohiba laptop (was a 200 gig, now a 320 gig) and I did not realize that this would not work.  I used the recover DVD's supplied and everything was OK until I tried to install SP1 for Vista . . .and the trouble started.  Microsoft support took me through the system update readiness tool which fixed some of the errors, but I had the BCD 00xc000000f Boot selection failed because a required device is inacessibile error. 

    Finally Microsoft through in the towel saying I needed an oriional Vista Retail DVD to resolve the issues.

    Using this description as a guide, I did the following:


    1. Boot into Windows recovery mode and bring up a command prompt
    2. cd \Boot
    3. If Copied the original BCD file  to BCD.Backup.0001. 
    4. Make a copy of your original memtest.exe: copy memtest.exe memtest.exe.org.
    5. Copy the renamed BCD file to memtest.exe: copy BCD.Backup.0001 memtest.exe.
    6. Rename memtest.exe to BCD after deleting the origional BCD. 
    7. Now rename memtest.exe.org memtest.exe. 
    8. Now Exit back to the repair options GUI and run startup repair again (you may not need to do this if your original BCD data is still OK, but I did it anyway); the repair step should work this time and the system should reboot.

    SP1, after reboot continued from Stage 2 to 3 then 1 through 3 again.  All appears to be fine!

    WOW this fixed the same problem for me. (Total identified windows installations: 0 when running fixmbr etc after I got the error "BOOTMGR is missing" ).

    In my case the problem had an interesting history.

    Immediately before the error, I had reformatted the 10GB D drive (the one called HP_RECOVERY). I did this because I had used an old hard disk out of a different model laptop (a mini-note), and I did not want anyone trying to use it for recovery as it would not work. (The laptop had failed to boot and offered the Recovery process, so I wanted to get rid of it.)

    Then I changed the system restore to use D instead of C to store itself.

    Then I tried to create a recovery DVD using the inbuilt Vista process. This hung, and I eventually restarted the machine.

     

    The C drive had the description Boot, Page File, Crash dump, primary partition, so I assumed that it would be OK (and that trashing the D drive would have no effect). Wrong.

    That's when I ran into the BOOTMGR missing.

     

    In the DVD recovery process, the operating system was detected on D.

    This is what I thought was a bit odd a it should surely be C - despite booting from DVD (drive E?)?

     

    As an aside, using the hard disk form a working Mininote Vista Hone Premium in a Presario V3000m, I only needed to manually change the wifi network drivers, and then I could boot and get the other few drivers required!)  A pleasant change. And hopefully one of the last Vista repairs I will have to do (some hope :(

     

    After the fix, C is still reported as

    Boot, Page File, Crash dump, primary partition

    and D is reported as

    System, Active, primary partition

    • Edited by broozm Friday, July 16, 2010 10:23 PM more info
    Friday, July 16, 2010 10:22 PM
  • Hello,

     

      Thanks a lot, my VHD got currupted by Virtual box, hence couldn't boot up the system, thanks a lot for your information about rebuilding BCD. it really worked for me and saved lots lots of time.

    thank you.


    dare to dream
    Saturday, July 24, 2010 9:16 AM
  • Regarding method 2 --

    I am in a similar situation to AnnieG (after  a BIOS update on a RAID system that caused an overwrite of the parameters, which were fixed afterwards by hand) ...

    I had run bootrec with steps /fixmbr and /fixboot successfully. I cannot run /rebuildbcd as bootrec now says it does not find an eligible installation. After that, the system repair as started from the installation disk correctly identifies my former installation. The command bcdedit displays a full set of boot settings.However, I still cannot boot and get the error from winloader that a needed device cannot be found  (0xc000000e). So I cannot boot from my C: drive. 

    Two questions -- Can it be that my disk has a bad signature as a consequence of /fixmbr?

    -- does the option reuildbcd change the partition table?

    Thanks in advance, best, Marcus

    Monday, September 13, 2010 9:44 PM
  • thanks, fixed it for me, awesome
    Wednesday, November 03, 2010 12:01 AM
  •  

    HI

    i had the similar problem with the bcd, but now i get Bootmgr is missing at start up and in command prompt i get an 

    I/O error when typing bootrec.exe /fixboot


    is there any hope for this HDD to recover

     

     

    Tuesday, December 28, 2010 11:28 AM
  • I tried the copy/rename trick but no results come.

    In my case the bootrec /rebuildbcd command reports no vista installation. The recovery program detects one vista installation in the c: drive.

    I'm unable to boot my system, it show this message: A disk read error occurred, press ctrl+alt+del to restart.

    I'm only able to boot the recovery partition using an usb boot loader.

     

    Wednesday, December 29, 2010 1:19 AM
  • Microsoft: Please answer to all the people out there: WHY is this happening and WHY isn't this really annoying bug not fixed yet???

    I see more Blue Screens in Windows 7 (Ultimate) than I ever saw even in Windows 95. I am seriously thinking of going back to XP (I know there are 64 Bit versions out there that could handle my 16GB Ram).

    I had to reinstall my Win 7 now 5 times!!

    This is not acceptable for such an expensive OS which supposed to be superior to other OS's out there. So many (GOOD!) features have been removed from Win 7 and I don't really see much benefit (except the handling of my RAM) over the older XP version.
    Libraries are no good to me, since I use only a standalone Computer and I am organized. I think mostly nu-organised people benefit from the Libraries and Search bar in the Start menu. Organized people that simply like it "THEIR" way are hard hit by al the limitation in the way you can set your computer up)

    Anybody in Sydney, Australia has a Win XP 64-Bit? I am highly interested to trade for Win 7 Ultimate!

    Saturday, March 26, 2011 11:58 AM
  • I have an HP laptop running Vista home premium. I've had this problem twice. once when I only had the computer 3 months (In Jan '09) and luckily I kept the FREE file I downloaded as the "Vista Restore disk", as the one that HP SOLD as the repair for this problem did not fix it . I tried the
    BOOTREC\FIXMBR method without success. I don't see the free Vista Restore disk download from Microsoft anymore,(due to licensing restrictions imposed by microsoft) and I have to ask WHY? The HP disk only installed a restore option on the hard drive that did not solve the problem.
    Saturday, August 27, 2011 7:03 AM