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Windows 7 and the battery error "consider replacing your battery" (Part 10)

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  • I have been watching this item for a few weeks hoping to find a resolution - but alas none.

    I have upgraded 3 laptops with the official release of Win7 with the following results:

    Acer Aspire 5315 (2 years old) from Vista Basic to Win7 Prof (32bit) CLEAN INSTALL - no problem with the battery

    Dell Inspiron 1750 (3 months old) from Vista Prem to Win7 Prem (64bit) UPGRADE - no problem with battery

    Dell Vostro 1510 (18 months old) from Vista Basic to Win7 Prem (64bit) CLEAN INSTALL - battery destroyed

     

    Like a previous member, I am wondering whether it is the 64bit version only - in which case it proves to be a Microsoft problem.  My Vostro was lasting ~ 2.5 hours under Vista Basic, but within a few weeks of the upgrade battery life is reduced to minutes.  The powercfg output reads:

    Battery:Battery Information
    Battery ID 11Dell
    Manufacturer Dell
    Serial Number 11
    Chemistry Lion
    Long Term 1
    Design Capacity 57720
    Last Full Charge 12400
    I have no intention of buying a new battery until this issue is resolved, so until then I have another desktop!!
    Tuesday, April 27, 2010 2:48 PM
  • I'm DONE. I have been waiting for months for this problem to be fixed so I could buy Win7, Microsoft just keeps denying the problem and I'm not taking the risk of upgrading and killing my battery. I will be replacing Vista with Ubuntu 9.10, an OS that is FREE an has less problems then Microsoft products which are programmed by PAID employees and backed by billions of dollars. Unreal! 
    Tuesday, April 27, 2010 10:00 PM
  • if only i found this thread earlier, i won't install win7

    Acer Timeline 3810T - clean install from vista home premium (32bit) to windows 7 home premium (64bit) - battery destroyed within 2weeks and won't charge

    Acer Timeline 4810T - clean install from vista home premium (32bit) to windows 7 home premium (32bit) - battery destroyed within 2weeks and only last 1/2hr

    Acer Timeline 1410 - factory OEM windows 7 home premium (64bit) - battery OK until now

     

    nb: Acer Timeline series battery can last up to 8hrs. under vista it used to last 7hrs.

    After battery problem, i revert the OS back to factory vista, but battery problem still persist. so i am sending both laptop to acer service for warranty claim...

    Wednesday, April 28, 2010 3:58 AM
  • I'm holding off on upgrading my girlfriend's laptop (a Dell Inspiron 1545) to Windows 7 because of this. I don't care that it's not a model anyone has mentioned having problems with Windows 7's battery management. I'm not giving them my money until they fix this.

    This is common sense. Battery has proper runtime > install Windows 7 > battery runtime goes to ____. What is so difficult to understand about this? Let's take this example - Say I have a functioning Windows machine, but then I install an application and it starts BSODing. If I call Microsoft support, what do you think the first thing they'll get me to do is? UNINSTALL THE APPLICATION.

    Wednesday, April 28, 2010 1:19 PM
  • Appears to be a problem with Windows 7.
    I found out that the following steps, revived the battery, which is possibly caused by a buggy ACPI in Windows 7.


    Running Windows 7 32 bit, getting 30-35 minutes of battery power when AC is disconnected.
    Disable the Microsoft ACPI-Compliant Control Method under BATTERY in the device manager.

    Put the computer on HIGH PERFORMANCE (I get approx 2 hours of battery life before it shuts down on HIGH PERFORMANC.....Eensure Screen Dim, etc are NEVER) and start running Scandisk (Sector errors scan), Virus Scan, defrag, anything to make it quickly die.

    When it has died and there is no power left, remove the battery for a few minutes, press the power button, put the battery back in and plug the power plug in and started the system up.

    When windows loads, enable the ACPI-Compliant Method.

    BatteryCare (cool program) should now be showing a FULL total capacity, rather than 1/3 or less that it was previously.  There is also no Wear Level now (for me), it is saying 0.00% - previously it was 63%.

    Since the power on, there is no X over the power icon, its acting normally.

    Buggy ACPI - perhaps doesnt charge further than 40% and therefore the warning appears? Doesnt recognise that there is more to charge?

    Either way, this fixed my issue and I could then use it for 2 hours, it told me two hours and no longer died at 30 minutes.
    Wednesday, April 28, 2010 2:04 PM
  • My original Dell Inspiron laptop battery went from 2 hours plus to less than 15 minutes back in October 2009 after upgrading to Windows 7 from Vista...After using a newly purchased replacement battery on my dell inspiron upgraded to Windows 7 , I noticed a 5 to 10 percent degradation in less than a week. I then stopped using the new battery and about a month ago, I reinstalled Vista from a disc image I had made before the Windows 7 upgrade and now running the old Vista os , the replacement battery is back to 100% and is charging perfectly. I'm getting well over 3 hours use now.   I miss Windows 7, but the battery seems to operate correctly under Vista - something neither of my batteries did under Windows 7.
    Wednesday, April 28, 2010 2:48 PM
  • I am about to do the same with my batt

    I disabled the batt ACPI,

    plugged a batt almoste fully charged (about 95%) that I did recharge previously laptop OFF

    I used it for about 32 mins, in balance profile the reboot and checked the batt status under SUSE LiveCD ,the charge was at 57%

    not really well but will see how far would it go, for now i restarted under W7and now it is runing for 20 mins.

    For sure W7 did somthing to my batt registry, as it returns the same informations in Suse LiveCD as in W7,

    i.e. a design capacity of 88800 mWh which is completly rubbish.

     

    i tried before drainnig the batt ,that allowed me recover about 5% of capacity, i went from 38% to 42% of design cap

    Wednesday, April 28, 2010 8:11 PM
  • didn't work for me

     

    the batt last for about 79 mins until it drain at the end

    battbar still reports 88800 design cap and 62 % wear 1h38 endurance

     

    it seems that i got to go through the freezer, or find or build a tool to restore the batt design cap register :-(

     

    next step before the freezer ,try install vista driver.

     

    modif:

    i went back to 37,3% last full cap

    i.e. 2240 mAh instead of 2400 mAh

    also the reported 88800 mWh (6000 mAh) is not rubbish it s just 2 * 44400 mWh

    you can notice the X2 factor => 50 % batt charge

    new idea to track on.

    Wednesday, April 28, 2010 8:48 PM
  • Didn't work for me either.

    Since the battery gets "destroyed" by Win7 - this surely is because the battery memory is "written" to, telling it that its capacity is reduced.  I well remember having an old Epson printer that said it wanted servicing, just because of an internal counter in memory.  Someone wrote a utility to reset the printers memory - no more problem.  What is the chance that a "utility" could arise that wrote to the batteries memory to reset the capacity to where it should be?

     

     

    Thursday, April 29, 2010 10:32 AM
  • first i've got a question to every body here :

     

    DID ANY ONE HAVE EVER EXPIRIENCED THIS BUG WITH W7 X86 (32 bits) ????????

     

     

    then i would say i need time to think about this X2 factor to come out with a theory of what happening really with the acpi driver and then fix it

    don't worry paulusuk22, chances are growing up,

    for the time being i am lil bit busy with my job, and all sort of things of every day but at the end i will definitely write this d..n' tool to fix batt register

     

     

    BECAUSE I AM REALLY, COMPLETELY, F..... FADE UP WITH THIS SITUATION OF TAKING OFF MY BATTERY TO AVOID DESTROYING IT EVEN MORE AND BEING STUCK ALL THE TIME TO AN AC PLUG !!!!!!

    WHILE MICROSOFT IS IGNORING 6 BILLION PEOPLE ON EARTH COMPLAINING ABOUT W7.

    IT IS NOT WORTH WASTING MY MONEY ON W7 LICENSE, AND YOU GUYS WORKING IN MICROSOFT, DON'T DESERVE YOUR SALARY, I DON'T HAVE TO PAY YOU ANY MORE.

     

    this forum is turning ridiculous, i will not post anymore, i will continue investigating and publishing on facebook's page.

    so every body who want get his batt back ,go there, we'll meet there and find a solution for us.

     

    Thursday, April 29, 2010 3:43 PM
  • DID ANY ONE HAVE EVER EXPIRIENCED THIS BUG WITH W7 X86 (32 bits) ????????

    Same problems with W7 32bit.

    I initially installed Windows 7 RC (32 bit) on top a Vista Ultimate installation, and used it for a number of months with no issues. Then when I eventually performed a clean install of Windows 7 Professional (32 bit), the battery failed within days.

    This was on Lenovo T61 laptop.

    Friday, April 30, 2010 7:52 AM
  • well ,thank you ,

    meet you there.

    Friday, April 30, 2010 10:51 AM
  • Totally frustrating ! ! ! !  Acer Extensa 5620Z, cleared vista totally, upgraded to Windows 7 ..........  same problems as everyone else.  Been using AC for power, battery (Li Ion) almost totally useless now.  Never had a problem with battery on Vista.  Was going to order new battery, whew ! ! !....... found this forum just now and read above posts.......  will wait on further info before I order new battery to deepen someone else's pockets during these "financial challenging" times, we all are having to face.  How about it, MS?????  Any ideas????    getting "consider replacing your battery"... "there is a problem with your battery, so your computer may shut down suddenly"....  well, you got the last six words correct, anyhow, MS, but it is no laughing matter.

    Sunday, May 02, 2010 5:05 AM
  • Totally frustrating ! ! ! !  Acer Extensa 5620Z, cleared vista totally, upgraded to Windows 7 ..........  same problems as everyone else.  Been using AC for power, battery (Li Ion) almost totally useless now.  Never had a problem with battery on Vista.  Was going to order new battery, whew ! ! !....... found this forum just now and read above posts.......  will wait on further info before I order new battery to deepen someone else's pockets during these "financial challenging" times, we all are having to face.  How about it, MS?????  Any ideas????    getting "consider replacing your battery"... "there is a problem with your battery, so your computer may shut down suddenly"....  well, you got the last six words correct, anyhow, MS, but it is no laughing matter.

    I have exactly the same model and exactly the same problem! :-(
    Sunday, May 02, 2010 8:01 AM
  • News from me... I had a few hours to waste and decided to experiment a little. I took my desktop (an Acer Aspire 6935g, that used to be a laptop before I bought and installed Win7 pro 64 bit), formatted a partition, deleted the hidden recovery stuff so I had a blank machine. I put its original battery in its place (like many of us I have another dead one too ...) and installed Ubuntu 10.04 LTS 64 bit.. It works like a charm and, guess what, it looks like the battery is alive again and even recharging (win 7 didn't see it and it was impossible to recharghe it even with the laptop was shut off, it was as dead as a stone). So much for those, if there's still any, who doubt Win 7 is the prob... Now I'm checking if all my hardware works correctly (it looks like it does at the moment) and if so I'll stick to Ubuntu since it doesn't eat my battery... oh, did I  mention it's so much cheaper than 7?
    Sunday, May 02, 2010 4:47 PM
  • I have found a fix. solutions and way to end it all.

     

    Buy a new battery.

     

    Now maybe I am going to sound silly as I was bashing Windows 7 as well earlier in this thread.  But hear me out.

     

    I have a HP laptop. I had the same issue. I had my laptop for a year so it could have been possible that that battery did need to be replaced. I went and bought a new battery and I have had no problems since (March). It lasts 2-2.5 hours steady.

    I know a lot of people are saying "windows 7 is destroying batteries" but lets think of it this way:

    ANY battery you buy from ANY company will have a warrenty of 1 year against defect and losing charge. So I SUGGEST you just GO BUY one. It will cost $135 but it gives you a WHOLE year to allow windows 7 to "destroy" your battery and if it doesnt destroy it then problem solved. In the event that it DOES damage and destroy your battery: you simply call the manufacturer and tell them its gone bad, get a brand new one and dont use it until MS releases a patch.

     

    So lets recap:

    For $135? You get a 1 year trial period to see if windows 7 actually does destroy your new battery? and if it does your insured because of the warranty?

     

    or solutions #2

     

    Whine and b*tch and moan for another year about how you are tethered to your ac adapter?

     

    Like I said I had the same issue as all of you, I purchased a new battery and it has been totally fine and is still intact and windows 7 has not damaged it in anyway. No patches, no updates just a new battery.

     

    just my 2 cents.

     

     

     

     

    Monday, May 03, 2010 3:20 AM
  • Come on; Not everyone has $135 (150euro in my case) laying around for something which is not really necessary (if Microsoft would just fix the damn issue). Plus you have to get a new battery from your warranty every year, which is always harder than it should be.

    Although I like windows 7, I officially dislike Microsoft for the way they handled this issue and will think again before I will buy something Microsoft made. Batteries don't just die in 2 weeks after you installed windows 7 out of coincidence.

    Monday, May 03, 2010 10:41 AM
  • Hi. I am yehs14 from the Philippines.

    I have COMPAQ PRESARIO V3000 laptop. My laptop is just less than a year old.

    My original OS is Windows Vista. I used to have 4 to 5 hrs of battery usage until I upgraded my OS to Windows 7 Ultimate.

    From the original 4 hours of battery life, I ended up having less that 20mins of battery usage.

    I am also experiencing that error where in it displays an X on your battery and says that "Consider replaying your battery"

    Can Microsoft be responsible for what happened to our batteries? It is unfair for users to spend money in buying new batteries that will later on display the same problem.

     

    NOTE: My brother is using the same brand and model of laptop as I am. He is using Windows Vista and still enjoys the 4 hour battery life.

     

    PLEASE provide us some answer. What can we do to fix this problem. It is even better if you will replace all our batteries!

    Monday, May 03, 2010 4:33 PM
  • I have found a fix. solutions and way to end it all.

     

    Buy a new battery.

     

    Now maybe I am going to sound silly as I was bashing Windows 7 as well earlier in this thread.  But hear me out.

     

    I have a HP laptop. I had the same issue. I had my laptop for a year so it could have been possible that that battery did need to be replaced. I went and bought a new battery and I have had no problems since (March). It lasts 2-2.5 hours steady.

    I know a lot of people are saying "windows 7 is destroying batteries" but lets think of it this way:

    ANY battery you buy from ANY company will have a warrenty of 1 year against defect and losing charge. So I SUGGEST you just GO BUY one. It will cost $135 but it gives you a WHOLE year to allow windows 7 to "destroy" your battery and if it doesnt destroy it then problem solved. In the event that it DOES damage and destroy your battery: you simply call the manufacturer and tell them its gone bad, get a brand new one and dont use it until MS releases a patch.

     

    So lets recap:

    For $135? You get a 1 year trial period to see if windows 7 actually does destroy your new battery? and if it does your insured because of the warranty?

     

    or solutions #2

     

    Whine and b*tch and moan for another year about how you are tethered to your ac adapter?

     

    Like I said I had the same issue as all of you, I purchased a new battery and it has been totally fine and is still intact and windows 7 has not damaged it in anyway. No patches, no updates just a new battery.

     

    just my 2 cents.

     

     

     

     

    Roland, I bought a new battery. Win7 sucked its life in less than 1 week...
    Monday, May 03, 2010 6:17 PM
  • I have an HP Pavilion dv9700.

    Original OS Vista. 

    Upgraded to Windows 7 due to the laptop constantly crashing. 

    Now I have the battery problem too.  There were no issues prior to the upgrade, then all of a sudden it started.  I have noted that one of my AC chargers will no longer charge the battery either.  I think my lapop is coming up two years old.

    Monday, May 03, 2010 11:57 PM
  • I just downgraded my Dell D620 back to XP, and bought myself a new battery. Such a shame. I liked everything about 7 except the the one main crippling issue.

    I guess I'll have to wait until I buy a new laptop to enjoy windows 7 (or possibly 8 by that time) goodness.

    Since microsoft hasnt provided anything by now, then I doubt this issue will be fixed. If you want to run 7 on a laptop and have decent battery life, go buy a new laptop, or buy an external battery.

    Tuesday, May 04, 2010 12:08 AM
  • So I finally decided to get rid of Win7 an re-installed WinXP (clean) on my laptop (Acer Aspire 5100) again.

    Result: my battery is still fuc*ed an unusable. Under WinXP, the batteries capacity is shown as 707389 mWh, which is obviously completely wrong. The correct value should be 43200.

    I guess my battery is completely destroyed now, thanks to Win7... even WinXP can't handle my battery with those absurd values anymore.

     

    ...does anybody still care? Hello Microsoft, we got problems! I feel left high and dry by you!

    Tuesday, May 04, 2010 11:24 AM
  • Microsoft's silence is deafening. This is my latest powercfg output from my Sony Vaio, less than year old and fine with Vista. No battery error message just a dead battery.

    Battery:Battery Information
    Battery ID Sony Corp.
    Manufacturer Sony Corp.
    Serial Number  
    Chemistry LiOn
    Long Term 1
    Design Capacity 0
    Last Full Charge 47420

     

    Come on Microsoft, say something, this is madness. So many people are reporting problems. If I buy a new battery and it fries after a couple of weeks who do I see about a refund, Sony ? Microsoft ?

     

    Saturday, May 08, 2010 11:43 AM
  • I now have this battery problem as well. UGH!

    I have an Acer Aspire 3000 I bought with Windows XP a few years ago. I has run perfectly for those years until 6 months ago when the original battery died. I use this for school so I use it a lot. I purchased a new battery not cheap ($150 USD) but I wanted a good one this laptop is in perfect condition and runs well. I am taking CS so I need a Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 classes. I figured I would update my laptop to Windows 7 Ultimate for my classes. I wiped my Windows XP drive clean and installed Windows 7 Ultimate clean on the machine. Which has been working perfectly for 6 weeks. Never an issue until 3 weeks ago the machine states my battery is bad. I called the place where I bought the battery and they said they would replace it. I put the battery in and 3 weeks later you got it bad battery. This machine never had an issue with Windows XP and the battery. The place I bought the battery from will not give me another new battery. They tell me that have never had problems with these batteries until recently and the machines loaded with Windows 7. They are now telling me if a customer calls and says the battery is bad and they are using Windows 7 the warranty is VOID. If the battery companies are now doing this there may be a problem with Windows 7. I hope MS will get to the bottom of this. I can't afford to buy a new laptop for school so now I make sure I sit next to the wall with an electrical outlet so my laptop is plugged in. UGH!!!

     

    Monday, May 10, 2010 6:04 AM
  • Enough is enough. How long will it still take until MS takes real action? Why should I send you my configuration if you don't react for months?? My battery is running at just 50% capacity, but it's not getting any worse since I installed the new Ubuntu 10.04 - an awesome OS btw. I will stick to it and NEVER EVER AGAIN buy ANY Microsoft product. If you don't treat your customers right, you will feel the consequences soon!

    Everybody who's affected - switch to alternate OS's!
    Monday, May 10, 2010 6:17 PM
  • Microsoft's silence is quite impressive indeed. But the tech press' mutism and  self censorship about all this is even more.

    How it's possible that none of this hasn't had even the faintest echo on specialized magazines?

    Swoosh, i agree with you, the last ubuntu is terrific and, with WINE on, even some essential windows stuff runs smoothly.

     

     

    Monday, May 10, 2010 10:26 PM
  • Your advice is irrelevant. I found this forum puzzled by behaviour of the battery in my brand new acer netbook, with wXP already installed (certified, registered etc). My primary machine is a mac powerbook, with a battery performing perfectly more than a year - I really can't even remember when it was bought. Anyway, yesterday, after a few months of not much work, Sony battery in Acer charged till 92% and stopped, today max charge was 85%, and computer, logically, never stops charging the battery. I have a lot of experience with mac laptops and I can tell you that this thing is ludicrous. If microsoft is really to blame - although I can't even fathom how an OS can dry out the battery - well, it is cheaper to buy a mac!
    Tuesday, May 11, 2010 8:25 PM
  • Thanks, I see this as an only way to work on PCs, kudos
    Tuesday, May 11, 2010 8:33 PM
  • Same thing with my Vostro DELL 500, battery has lived for 3-4 full discharges, and then went to "replace your battery" state.

    Why dont somebody do something about it?!

    Wednesday, May 12, 2010 12:44 AM
  • I'd say evidence that 7 messes up with batteries is rather solid unless we all are a bunch of lunatics....

    Wednesday, May 12, 2010 9:52 PM
  • Hello to everyone,

    I am the proud owner of a Toshiba Tecra M10-11U with preinstalled Vista. Under my perspective Vista was the worst OS I have ever tried and the downgrade to the old classic XP was my only choice. Afterwards I decided to upgrade to Win7. That was a tragic mistake... Now I have an excellent and powerdull laptop transformed to a permanatelly AC connected desktop... I am checking either this or Toshiba's forums for almost 5 months now, but nothing changed...at least for my poor computer.

    These people in MS are pure amateurs. Instead of checking & finding a decent solution, they state that Win7 do not kill batteries... well you are right, it is not the OS which killed our batteries, it was our decision to pay money for upgrading to the new OS which did! 

    This is it. I fed up of waiting unil the SP1, SP2....SP99 fix all the bugs left! I will get a new battery and then I will format my HD and replace my OS with Ubuntu Linux.

    Bye Bye Microsoft, after 20 years of using your products, you will never see me again as a customer! And just for your info, my company will also get rid of your products!

    Regards

    Manos from Athens/Greece

    Wednesday, May 12, 2010 11:26 PM
  • I think I know what the cause is...

    Have you all or someones updated your bios?

    Most don´t, but I do it like this:

     

    First, installed Windows 7, no battery problems, all was just fine.

    The, Installed a Modded Bios with 2.1 Slic [yeah, I KNOW], first within windows, no problem.

    Then from DOS, THEN Here comes the problem, updating from MS-DOS Seems to be deleting some values from the bios or configuration, after this I started getting the bad battery issue.

     

    So, for all people complaining, have you have installed a moded bios/ loader?

     

    Reinstalling a Original Bios from windows/DOS don´t fix the problem, I think is Permanent and is BIOS related, not Windows/Batery Related.

    I know there is some legit ones getting this but, c'mon people....

    Sunday, May 16, 2010 1:32 AM
  • I have a Toshiba Satelite u205-s5002 which I bought about four years ago.
    Running Windows 7 32bit.
    I am using a non-OEM battery that is roughly a year old.

    A few days ago while I was using my laptop on battery power, the battery gauge suddenly dropped from 40% to 7%.
    I didn't think much of it and attached it to a power adapter.

    When I turned my laptop on yesterday, I received the dreaded "consider replacing your battery message".
    I thought that was weird as the battery in question has been barely used over the year.
    It took roughly an hour to drain it to 7% at which point I disabled the "Microsoft ACPI-Compliant Control Method Battery" in Device Manager.
    To my surprise, the laptop survived another hour and a half after Windows 7 reported that the battery was depleted.
    Thus the total run time from 100% to depleted is roughly two and a half hours, which is the expected battery life with a new battery.
    Now here's the kicker, my laptop has a battery status light, and it didn't blink low battery until 10min before the laptop ran out of juice.
    So it seams that the laptop's circuitry is correct in sensing battery level while ACPI and/or Windows 7 is obtaining bogus numbers.

    I ran CPUID HWMonitor and Powercfg -energy, both show the following numbers:
    Design Capacity: 90720 mWH
    Full Charge Capacity: 32520mWH
    HWMonitor reports the battery voltage at 11.26V.
    The battery is rated at 10.8V @ 4400mAH.

    I have no idea what to do at this point because technically the battery is fine.
    The battery chip is probably not fried because the laptop is able to sense battery level fine while Windows 7 cannot.

    As an ode to the commercials, "Windows 7 was NOT my idea".
    It might not be possessed like Vista, but messing up power management is not cool...

     

    Update:

    I ran down my battery again (2.5 hours) but this time without disabling ACPI battery.
    I ran this command in cmd to disable automatic hibernation "powercfg -setdcvalueindex SCHEME_CURRENT SUB_BATTERY BATACTIONCRIT 0".
    When it reached 3%/1024mWH it didn't budge for a while.
    It started showing 1%/349mWH only when the battery light on my notebook started flashing.

    When I rebooted the machine plugged into mains, HWMonitor showed a full charge capacity of 38210mWH.
    Since 38210mWH/90720mWH is 42% (57% degraded) Windows 7 no longer thinks the battery needs to be replaced.
    I also think that the design capacity number is bad, it should be 44000mWH and in this case the battery is only degraded 13%.
    A 13% degradation over a period of a year is reasonable, 57% is not...

    Other Thoughts:
    I am no longer sure if Windows 7 is entirely to blame here.
    It seems that information provided by the battery and/or system to Windows is incorrect/unstable.
    Microsoft's mistake may be the assumption that the information presented is accurate.
    Given that it is not always accurate, they should provide an option to toggle these warnings.
    In the interim, they should at least issue a hotfix the turns the relevant warning code off...

    • Edited by ltctech Sunday, May 16, 2010 3:52 AM typo
    Sunday, May 16, 2010 3:48 AM
  • Experienced the "consider replacing your battery" a month ago, and ordered a new battery. Now, suddenly, I get the same error on my new battery and can't charge over 3,6%. Microsoft, please, make a solution.

    Monday, May 17, 2010 1:32 PM
  • This is truly depressing. Haha I hate it as much as anyone on here but I can't help it. I've only known about this issue (thanks to this thread) for about 3 weeks, before which I thought I just had to get a new battery. Since I've been here I've checked it every day....the real pity is those who have been here through rc stages struggling with this problem...to plead into the deaf ears of Microsoft for a year with a problem such is this is the absolute epitome of a giant rolling over its tiny faithfuls.

     

    I have another question, because of this error my battery never really gets hot, I feel like all the heat is transferred to the motherboard and slows the system down. My computer has been BSODing on me more and more recently...twice yesterday, and want to know if there's an association between this. Here are the results:

     

    Problem signature:

      Problem Event Name: BlueScreen

      OS Version: 6.1.7600.2.0.0.256.48

      Locale ID: 1033

     

    Additional information about the problem:

      BCCode: a

      BCP1: 0000000000000000

      BCP2: 0000000000000002

      BCP3: 0000000000000000

      BCP4: FFFFF80002FE5477

      OS Version: 6_1_7600

      Service Pack: 0_0

      Product: 256_1

    Tuesday, May 18, 2010 1:51 AM
  • Hello guy, same ____ to me. 1,5 years old FSC Lifebook S6410. With Vista Business I used to have  4:30-5:30h even up to 6:00h battery life and it took appx. 4h to fully charge. In the notification area I,ve even see "battery time remaining 7:45h" . 6 months ago I've upgradet to 7 Ultimate. Well in the beginning it showed in notification area 4:30h, but actually laptop dies around 3:30h. Later I've realized, that actually the charging time is appx. 2h. 6 months later I could barely squeeze 2:15h life on battery. Finally a month ago I got pissed off and returned to Vista. Well , now I have my appx. 5 h on battery back . Now it takes again ages to recharge (appx. 4h). I like Win7 but I hate cables, so stuck with Vista for now.I've spoken with FSC support and they told me to stay with Vista for now until Microsofts corrects this
    Tuesday, May 18, 2010 11:35 AM
  • Here is the story of my life.

    Have a great Dell laptop w/ 9 cell battery lasting about 5 hours.

    Upgrade to Windows 7.

    Stupid battery notification window starts showing up almost immediately.

    Google around to figure out how to turn off the notification and turn it off.

    After about two weeks the 5 1/2 hours of battery life has now morphed into a crappy 40 minutes. The meter doesn't even help. I'll be working sometimes, look at the battery as it says 45% left, five minutes later the computer shuts off b/c the battery has fully drained?

     

    FIX THE PROBLEM FOR GOD'S SAKE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Tuesday, May 18, 2010 1:38 PM
  • I just let the battery charging the first time the msg come out, and it was full already.

    I unplugged the battery, run on AC Power only for 3 days and now I put the battery Back and run the laptop on only battery...

     

    ITs working Fine!.. It showed 90% at the start and now is 48%, 42%... maybe is discharging too fast but the "put new battery" msg is gone. 

    I hope it don´t reapear next time I charge it up.

    Wednesday, May 19, 2010 4:21 AM
  • Hey guys,

     

    I'm facing the same problem on my Acer Aspire 5930G. Updated from Vista a couple months ago and now Win7 tells me to get rid of my battery....

    I already contacted the support, but they keep blaming Acer....

    Since it's my daily life, I'm now considering to take legal steps according to German law. These guys from Microsoft really deserve it...

    Have you already thought about that, too or maybe about some bad media coverage?

     

    This ignorance needs to be punished...

    Wednesday, May 19, 2010 7:21 AM
  • How about new batteries ? Mine is wasted...

     

    I upgraded Acer Extensa 5430 to W7 only to have ½ hour battery. Vista gave me 2½ hours.

    My laptop is ruined. Can't use ½ an hour for much.

    Battery and PC is 4 months old.


    Please send me a new battery.

    Friday, May 21, 2010 1:14 AM
  • I'm using Acer Aspire 5738G laptop,

    Experiencing the same problems as the users stated above,

    Microsoft, Please provide a solution to this problem

    Saturday, May 22, 2010 3:01 PM
  • Well my Dell Inspiron 1720 is still havining the problem. I replaced the original battery that was a few years old within a week of installing Windows 7 Pro x64 RTM. I was getting about 2 -2.5 hrs and then all of a sudden it was dead so I purchased a new 9 cell that lasted maybe 2 weeks before I went from getting 4.5 hrs of use to only about 1 hr of use. I was able to get it replaced under warranty and also purchased another so I did not have to wait on the RMA process. The new battery was getting about 4.5 hrs when I installed it about 2 months ago and is not doen to about 2 hrs. I still have an unused battery sitting but am too afraid to use it since Windows 7 has killed it's 3rd battery for me now.

    It is time that Microsoft finally admits that there is an issue with Windows 7 and provides a fix. I can not afford to be replacing batteries every few months.

    Sunday, May 23, 2010 4:06 AM
  • I think I know what the cause is...

    Have you all or someones updated your bios?

    Most don´t, but I do it like this:

     

    First, installed Windows 7, no battery problems, all was just fine.

    The, Installed a Modded Bios with 2.1 Slic [yeah, I KNOW], first within windows, no problem.

    Then from DOS, THEN Here comes the problem, updating from MS-DOS Seems to be deleting some values from the bios or configuration, after this I started getting the bad battery issue.

     

    So, for all people complaining, have you have installed a moded bios/ loader?

     

    Reinstalling a Original Bios from windows/DOS don´t fix the problem, I think is Permanent and is BIOS related, not Windows/Batery Related.

    I know there is some legit ones getting this but, c'mon people....

    I've read this  only today.  Nokoda, my Acer 6935g came with vista utlimate pre installed. I bought a legit 7 professional 64 bit because i didn't like vista at all and never experienced the replace your battery message simple because in less that 1 week the battery was completely dead. OS didn't recognized it anymore and now way to charge it. I bought a second battery (didn't know about the windows 7 issue at that time) with the same result.

    The interesting thing is that I removed seven and reinstalled my old vista and, on another partition, Ubuntu: batteries are still as dead as a brick and won't recharge, so the damage must be permanent. Let's only hope it's just the battery to be damaged, and not the laptop ...

     

    Sunday, May 23, 2010 7:44 AM
  • The post above and many others similar to it about people replacing their batteries and the replacement batteries still being dead under other Operating Systems is making me think that MS are seriosuly concerned about this.

    Their silence in a thread that has had over 6000 views is a little more sinister than 'ignoring the problem and hoping it'll go away', my guess is that the techy bods who were originally replying and trying to help have been told by the legal bods to not post anything further on the matter.

     

    Sunday, May 23, 2010 8:58 AM
  • I have the same issue. I have purchased a new battery for my acer 5920G but have not put it in yet,as I do not want it to get ruined like my last one did and like many others in this thread has happened to them...

     

    I am about to format and go back to vista, which was originally installed on my laptop when I bought it before upgrading it. If by some miracle that fixes the problem. I will post back here.

     

    It really does amaze me and it seems many other people too how MS is ignoring this OBVIOUS issue/fault.

     

    How a big company like this can manage to get away with it is mind boggling.

    Sunday, May 23, 2010 1:42 PM
  • Well, Gateway M1625, recent Win7 32-bit install, used to get two hours of battery time when conserving power, now down to about fifteen minutes.  Thanks, Microsoft.

    We need a fix for this.

    Sunday, May 23, 2010 2:54 PM
  • Appears to be a problem with Windows 7.
    I found out that the following steps, revived the battery, which is possibly caused by a buggy ACPI in Windows 7.


    Running Windows 7 32 bit, getting 30-35 minutes of battery power when AC is disconnected.
    Disable the Microsoft ACPI-Compliant Control Method under BATTERY in the device manager.

    Put the computer on HIGH PERFORMANCE (I get approx 2 hours of battery life before it shuts down on HIGH PERFORMANC.....Eensure Screen Dim, etc are NEVER) and start running Scandisk (Sector errors scan), Virus Scan, defrag, anything to make it quickly die.

    When it has died and there is no power left, remove the battery for a few minutes, press the power button, put the battery back in and plug the power plug in and started the system up.

    When windows loads, enable the ACPI-Compliant Method.

    BatteryCare (cool program) should now be showing a FULL total capacity, rather than 1/3 or less that it was previously.  There is also no Wear Level now (for me), it is saying 0.00% - previously it was 63%.

    Since the power on, there is no X over the power icon, its acting normally.

    Buggy ACPI - perhaps doesnt charge further than 40% and therefore the warning appears? Doesnt recognise that there is more to charge?

    Either way, this fixed my issue and I could then use it for 2 hours, it told me two hours and no longer died at 30 minutes.

    I did try this. Once again I'd like to state that I'm running the 32-bit version of W7 on my HP G70-250US. I had hope for this but unfortunately W7 destroyed my battery to the point where it only holds a charge for 10 minutes. I sat down and timed it with battery care both on an off. Many times now, my laptop will not even turn on with the battery in it. I guess I wasn't really using the thing anyway, so taking it out and just keeping it plugged in to turn it on and use it isn't all that strange... I mean I've been having to keep it plugged in for the last half a year anyway.... Yep.

    Thanks Microsoft. Next time I want to destroy an expensive piece of hardware that I use for work and school I'll be sure to send it your way.

    Sunday, May 23, 2010 7:18 PM
  • Thank you for the info Vegan but somehting doesn't add upp...

    You said that notebooks are not suitable for OS upgrade and yet all notebooks with Windows Vista OS were promoted with upgradeable licence for Windows 7 (starting from the end of the June last year) and if they are not suitable how come that upgrade to Windows 7 was the main focus of the campaign?

    Another thing, if it is really up to manufacturers, why didn't it happen before? Never before did I encounter somehting like this until the famous Windows 7 came and killed my battery! Don't get me wrong, 7 is great OS and I really like it and so far it has only one major fault which is battery destruction...

    I wish that Microsoft would be fair company like Toyota was and admit the error and try to fix it instead of ignoring it and trying to push the problem to others.

     

    Regards
    M

    Monday, May 24, 2010 9:34 AM
  • The upgrade is a marketting gimmick. I know of many who attempted the upgrade that caused the battery problem among other issues.

     


    Vote if answered or helpful, I am running for Office (joke)! IT/Developer, Windows/Linux/Mainframe Need a some parts finish the new server, see the site for remaining items needed

    What are the other problems?

    Does windows 7 kill any other hardware parts other than battery,

    I never heard any other reports other than battery issue,

    I'm using Acer 5738G laptop & I'm really worried,

    I like the OS, But this darn problem forced me the downgrade to crappy Vista,

    Seriously thinking about a switchover to mac or linux

    Monday, May 24, 2010 7:01 PM
  • I bought me a new battery 2 weeks ago and until today she still works fine. I hope I´ve got now more the "repülacing the battery" issue.

    Medion Akoya Laptop

    Tuesday, May 25, 2010 8:49 AM
  • Ever thought about a class action suit instead of complaining about Microsoft' s ignorance?!

     

    ......

    Tuesday, May 25, 2010 11:48 AM
  • Well Michael, if the informations in your profile are true and accurate you are probably the right guy to illustrate that option ... problem is, I humbly think, that batteries are not that expensive and I have no idea if "collateral damages" such as having your laptop turned into a desktop are in some way quantifiable for a compensation. I do believe that MS thinks that a class action is highly unlinkely due to the small economic damage that this issue has casued...

    I'm afraid they are right on that, unless we all find a knight - lawyer on a white horse ready to move war to the giant for the mere love of justice (and for free...). Do you know any?


    Tuesday, May 25, 2010 12:09 PM
  • hey there,

    I gotta do some specific research on that topic but from my (firm) opinion a claim for compensation is not so far off.

    Regards,

    Michael.

    Tuesday, May 25, 2010 1:29 PM
  • omg WTF MS is doing..

    it's already posting 10 ..

    This is getting bitchy.. where do they spend all their money from selling OS ?????

    They sure don't know how to do business

    my battery is gonna be out in 30 sec so... ~

    Wednesday, May 26, 2010 11:55 AM
  • I too have had this prblem but since installing Battery care its fine.

     

    The flashing red x has gone and so has the message "consider replacing your battery".

     

    http://batterycare.net

    Result.

    Wednesday, May 26, 2010 5:54 PM
  • Hi guys. I am the owner of a Toshiba Satellite L40. I ve had the same problem until today when my new battery came. Now the red x is gone and things are going normal. Until today I must admit I was very convinced that WINDOWS 7 has problems. It seems tough that we really need to buy new batteries.Of course I will follow the evolution of things for the next days or weeks and if anything strange happens I will come back. It is interesting to tell you how I have decided to buy a new battery. Last week one of my coworkers asked me to replace vista on his TOSHIBA SATELLITE L300 with a WINDOWS 7 version. Before installing windows 7 I have noticed that his battery had 30 minutes of life fully charged. I was sure that in these conditions the red X will pop in windows7. It happened of course. This made me reconsider my position about buying a new battery. For now I am happy that I have finally solved this problem. As promissed I will keep you informed of the evolution of things.

    UPDATE After the first full charge windows shows 2hrs and 37 minutes of battery life. The powercfg results are also normal now showing that the last known full charge is equal to the desgined battery capacity.

    Thursday, May 27, 2010 5:29 PM
  • Vonyx, I wish you all the best luck with your new battery, but the same thing happened to me: bought a new battery and thought the problem wasn't 7. Now I'm the not so happy owner of two plastic parallelepipeds. And it tok a copules of weeks only, if not less ....
    Thursday, May 27, 2010 7:35 PM
  • I have HP Pavilion dv6599ea which is 3 years old. It came with vista and the battery was working fine. I upgraded to win7 and the battery used to last for 1.5 hr for the first 2-3 months which is reasonable for a 3 year old battery. Suddenly I have got the "consider replacing your battery msg.." and it dropped to 30 mins. I thought the battery was dead. I have checked the new battery recall program that HP started and my old battery was eligable and HP sent me a new 6 cell battery. I inserted the new battery and it started charging and was observing it. The indicator stopped at 71% then suddenly jumped to 100% after 10 mins. I generated a report using powercfg and looks like the design capacity is reporting wrong on the NEW battery as per below!!! Not sure if I should stop using the battery or just go back to XP probably. I am happy with Win7 but this is really a frustrating issue and no one seems to have any workaround

     

     

    Battery:Battery Information
    Battery ID Hewlett-PackardPrimary
    Manufacturer Hewlett-Packard
    Serial Number  
    Chemistry LION
    Long Term 1
    Design Capacity 88800
    Last Full Charge 63462
    Monday, May 31, 2010 9:05 PM
  • I own an HP HDX 18 and it came with Vista Ultimate installed but everything worked fine.  I upgraded to Windows 7 and immediately began to have battery problems and now I have no life remaining in my 14 month old battery.  I have read every thread on this subject and it is quite obvious that MS has a severe problem on their hands that needs an immediate remedy.  Come on Bill, what the ____ are you smokin?
    Tuesday, June 01, 2010 9:04 PM
  • at first, i have hp pavilion dv5 1021et notebook. original os was vista and it was ok at all.(battery of course) i am using windows 7 for 6 months. i have an issue with the battery just for a couple days. my pc shuts down it self even it has %50 life of battery. i tried disabling acpi on device manager and charged to full but nothing changed. it always shuts when there is %50 life of battery. how can i solve this. this 10 pages are all this about? or mine is different?
    Thursday, June 03, 2010 6:42 AM
  • i have the same problem folks with my acer 6930 upgrading to windows 7. I tried going back to vista, but the battery problem remained even though the X sign was no longer there. The battery still dropped from 90% to 5% in after 5 minutes, so i guess that's it for my battery. and i am now afraid to buy a new one because i fear the same thing could happen and i would lose my money. it sucks big time, especially now the world cup is around the corner.
    Saturday, June 05, 2010 8:27 PM
  • I have a Acer TravelMate 6292 laptop with an extended battery. I am now getting the message after the last Windows 7 update. Until then my battery used to last atleast 2.5 to 3 hours. Now I ma barely getting an hour of battery life.

    Sunday, June 06, 2010 9:36 AM
  • I've got this same problem, it started last night.  I'm going to install Ubuntu on the laptop and move the win7 license to the desktop.  If I'm happy with Ubuntu, I'll switch completely to Ubuntu.  Oh, BTW, my laptop is a HP dv9700 if anyone is keeping score.
    Tuesday, June 08, 2010 11:10 PM
  • Letting it be known that as the owner of an HP dv6500t (originally Vista Home Premium 32-bit -> Vista Ultimate 64-bit -> Windows 7 64-bit), I too have started experiencing the battery drain issue the past few weeks. Shame on you Microsoft. As a loyal TechNet fan and beta tester this thread has changed my entire outlook.
    Wednesday, June 09, 2010 6:50 PM
  • Seems like it's getting pointless to post or even check this forum for a solution.  MS obviously doesn't care about our problems. I just hate the fact that I get 35 minutes of battery life out of my Dell and am extremely frightened to replace the battery knowing that I could be wasting $120. I guess if anything, I buy the new battery and don't start using it until I get Linux installed.
    Thursday, June 10, 2010 5:42 PM
  • I have a dell and bought a new 9 cell battery. Don't waste your money unless you plan on installing a different OS. The brand new 9 cell battery doesn't have anywhere near the battery life it should.

     

    F... U.. Microsoft.
    Thursday, June 10, 2010 7:09 PM
  • Sorry if this is a repost but it is relatively recent and I haven't seen it talked about. Is this not weird there is acknowledgement on only one of the models? Everything other symptom is identical so why just LG? Some insight would be good.

     

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/981200/

     

     

    SYMPTOMS

    After you upgrade to Windows 7 on certain LG notebooks, the Windows Battery Meter displays the following warning message:
    Consider replacing your battery
    This warning is displayed even if a new battery is inserted into the laptop.

    CAUSE

    This problem occurs because of a code defect in the system firmware (BIOS) of some LG notebooks. These include the R500 family of notebooks.

    The Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) firmware does not correctly initialize and report the Design Capacity field of the static battery information structure that is retrieved by using the _BIF method. Therefore, the Design Capacity that is reported to Windows may be much larger than the Last Full Charge capacity that is also reported in the static battery information structure. The Windows Battery Meter divides the Last Full Charge capacity by the Design Capacity to determine battery health. The Windows Battery Meter displays the "Consider replacing your battery" message when the Last Full Charge Capacity is less than 40% of the Design Capacity. When this issue occurs, the Design Capacity is reported as much larger than Last Full Charge capacity. Therefore, the "Consider replacing your battery" message is always shown.

    RESOLUTION

    To resolve this problem, contact the computer manufacturer to obtain a BIOS update for your computer. For more information, visit the following LG Web sites: The third-party products that this article discusses are manufactured by companies that are independent of Microsoft. Microsoft makes no warranty, implied or otherwise, about the performance or reliability of these products. Microsoft provides third-party contact information to help you find technical support. This contact information may change without notice. Microsoft does not guarantee the accuracy of this third-party contact information.

    APPLIES TO
    • Windows 7 Enterprise
    • Windows 7 Home Basic
    • Windows 7 Home Premium
    • Windows 7 Professional
    • Windows 7 Starter
    • Windows 7 Ultimate

    Sunday, June 13, 2010 1:14 AM
  • My message seems to have dissapeared as mysteriously as it came.
    Sunday, June 13, 2010 11:12 AM
  • My full charge capacity dropped once more to 35002 and is now showing a wear level of 61%.
    My design capacity is still 90720, which is wrong.

    Frankly, the battery life is still fine but Windows 7 keeps complaining and refuses to show remaining battery run time.
    Somebody should figure out a way to turn this feature (bug) off.

    Tuesday, June 15, 2010 5:17 AM
  • Hi All

     

    I'm having a problem with my Toshiba Tecra M9 PTM91E laptop, the battery indicator is showing the consider replacing you battery message, I have the latest BIOS update from Toshiba site version 2.00, I noticed when I disabled the critical shutdown on low battery that my laptop worked for more than 40m on power battery only with 2% remaining shown on the battery bar.

     

     

    Chemistry: Li-ion

    Design Capacity : 76140mWh (6921mAh)

    Full Charge Capacity : 23425mWh (2129mAh)

     

    Thursday, June 17, 2010 6:14 PM
  • Hi All

     

    I'm having a problem with my Toshiba Tecra M9 PTM91E laptop, the battery indicator is showing the consider replacing you battery message, I have the latest BIOS update from Toshiba site version 2.00, I noticed when I disabled the critical shutdown on low battery that my laptop worked for more than 40m on power battery only with 2% remaining shown on the battery bar.

     

     

    Chemistry: Li-ion

    Design Capacity : 76140mWh (6921mAh)

    Full Charge Capacity : 23425mWh (2129mAh)

     


    Yeah, my Toshiba Satelite u205 runs on a few percent battery for like 30min too.
    Must be something wrong with the drivers and/or bios interaction with Windows 7.

    The Design Capacity on my battery is absurd on my battery, hence the "consider replacing your battery" message.

    Friday, June 18, 2010 3:39 AM
  • Hi everyone:
          I have a Dell ispiron 1501, it's a bit old, i got this battery alert after an upgrade on June 16th. Product ID: 00426-OEM-8992662-00006. Is my battery old and wear out or is it a Bug in Windows?
    Friday, June 18, 2010 7:26 PM
  • I have a 3 year old asus FL5.

    Same error after win 7.

    Tried a few things, like unplug, discharge, bios-update etc etc.

    Now I installed Battery care.

    Now for 2 weeks my battery functions as normal!!!

    Saturday, June 19, 2010 5:38 AM
  • I also got battery care, but that doesn't seem to help.
    Sunday, June 20, 2010 10:03 PM
  • The upgrade is a marketting gimmick. I know of many who attempted the upgrade that caused the battery problem among other issues.

     


    Vote if answered or helpful, I am running for Office (joke)! IT/Developer, Windows/Linux/Mainframe Need a some parts finish the new server, see the site for remaining items needed


    Wait a minute, why did Microsoft local office promoted upgrade than? Microsoft knew that this shouldn't have been done but Microsift's marketing office pushed this promotion anyway...? Guys you did something really wrong here and you don't want to admit it or even try to fix it...

    There is definitely a strong case for law suit here if someone is persistant enough and I'm sure there will be sooner or later and you just continue to ignore this...

    Monday, June 21, 2010 12:29 PM
  • Here I got two laptops with the same issue.

     

    COMPAQ Presario CQ60-215DX

    Packard Bell Easynote MZ380-PB77

     

    The Compaq original OS was Win Vista, and I installed Win 7 from a clean install.

    All was normal the first months, but after two or three months the laptop suddenly shut down from nothing, showing the following screen on startup after the crash:

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    HP Battery Alert
    
    The system has detected the storage capacity of the battery stated below to be very low.
    
    For optimal performance, this battery may need to be replaced.
    
    Primary (internal) Battery (601)
    
    ENTER - Continue Startup
    
    For more information, please visit: www.hp.com\go\techcenter\startup

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Also there's the usual red X in the tray saying that the batt should be replaced.

    Then I found this forum thread and notices that the computer don't even last to low battery warning, shut down after 5 minutes in 100% energy level!

    In Linux KDE the Batt Control Module shows the battery recharging from 0 to 100% in 20 minutes, but then when I unplug the power cable the computer shut down in 100% energy level just as the Win 7 issue.

    - I updated the BIOS.

    - Reset the batt with a fews discharge and recharge cycles.

    - Even put the battery in the freezer!

    - Disabled ACPI Control and all that stuff.

    And nothing works, as I see there must be some kind of "writing" failure by win7 that messes up the battery, because it doesn't work in Linux, WinXP or Win7.

     

    The other computer (Packard Bell) is working better, and the battery still last about one hour, but before win7 it lasted like 1 and a half hour.

    What is the best solution for now? use the computer without the batteries?

    Monday, June 21, 2010 11:59 PM
  • What is the best solution for now? use the computer without the batteries?

    That's what I did. I was scared that Win 7 could burn my battery, so I took it out! Been waiting for a solution, but Microsoft doesn't seem to care (sadly). Some weeks ago, I finally switched back to Win XP and bought a new battery. Frustrating.
    Tuesday, June 22, 2010 5:37 PM
  • The same issue witH my Dell XPS-1530.
    Thursday, June 24, 2010 6:28 PM
  • This is bullshit... I wanted to be nice so i upgraded my mom's laptop to Windows 7 Home Premium FROM Windows Vista Home Premium and i got this problem. And it's a gateway... I used to get ay least 2 hours off of this battery and now it says Plugged in, charging. Consider replacing your battery. BTW I CAN charge my battery to 100%  but it lasts only 20 mins! and when the battery indicator goes down to 35% battery life it dies!!! i think the laptop is like 2 years old.i downloaded and installed a program called Battery Care (mentioned earlier in this topic) and it says my battery's wear level is 90.27%?????? I actually prefer micosoft's products rather than apple's shitty >hardware< but seriously Microsoft? Get off your lazy asses and do something! EVERYBODY WITH YOUR SHITTY  OS ON A NOTEBOOK IS HAVING THIS PROBLEM!!!  Anyways, it's gonna be real "fun" telling my mom her laptop is now a desktop...

    Thursday, June 24, 2010 6:41 PM
  • Is this only happening to notebooks that are upgraded to windows 7, or does this include notebooks that came with windows 7  ?
    Thursday, June 24, 2010 11:19 PM
  • can't believe there's no solution till now, how could it be? does microsoft think we are dumb?

     

    i got this message error today and was looking for a solution, but it seems as a lot of people have been looking for it since LAST YEAR?!!??

     

    i'm completely disappointed with win7, it is for sure a great OS, but doesn't worth my money if there's no solution for a stupid problem, it's a pity...

    Saturday, June 26, 2010 4:32 AM
  • I just got this error now...On windows 7 HomePremium 32bit. Annoying.

     

    All on a HP DV9202EA...Microsoft better get it sorted quickly.

    Sunday, June 27, 2010 4:31 PM
  • What is going on with Windows 7, I was just using my Acer Aspire 5515, and noticed a circle with an "X" in it, saying that I should "consider" buying a new battery. Well I have had this battery for almost 1 year now and it worked fine with Vista, and Xp, but now Windows 7 has this problem.

    Is there any true way to deal with this problem, because I know that my computer is fine.

    Also, I just though of this, since it was an update that messed up my computer, I might be able to use System Restore to get rid of this update cause my computer to go back to normal. I dont know, but I'm about to use, System Restore right now, and I will tell you if it works or not.

    Sunday, June 27, 2010 10:26 PM
  • YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!, I found the solution to OUR(Meaning Everyone's) PROBLEM!!!!

    This is for Windows 7 Users only!

    I see a message that says to "Consider replacing your battery."

    Windows notifies you on the battery meter when your battery gets down to 40 percent of its original capacity (that is, it can only hold 40 percent or less of its designed capacity after it has been charged). This notification is new in Windows 7—earlier versions of Windows can't notify you when your battery is going bad.

    Picture of battery meter showing a notification that a battery might be going bad

    Battery meter showing a notification that a battery might be going bad

    If you're receiving this message, you probably need to replace your battery. To verify this, contact your computer manufacturer. If you purchased the battery separately from the computer, contact the battery manufacturer.

    If you recently replaced your battery but your computer hibernates when the battery has a lot of charge remaining (even as much as 90 percent), you might need to uninstall the battery driver, and then restart your computer. Follow these steps:

    1. Click to open Device Manager.Administrator permission required If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

    2. Double-click Batteries.

    3. Right-click Microsoft ACPI-Compliant Control Method Battery, and then click Uninstall.

    4. Restart your computer

     

    Monday, June 28, 2010 7:09 PM
  • YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!, I found the solution to OUR(Meaning Everyone's) PROBLEM!!!!

    This is for Windows 7 Users only!

     

    I see a message that says to "Consider replacing your battery."

    Windows notifies you on the battery meter when your battery gets down to 40 percent of its original capacity (that is, it can only hold 40 percent or less of its designed capacity after it has been charged). This notification is new in Windows 7—earlier versions of Windows can't notify you when your battery is going bad.

    Picture of battery meter showing a notification that a battery might be going bad

    Battery meter showing a notification that a battery might be going bad

    If you're receiving this message, you probably need to replace your battery. To verify this, contact your computer manufacturer. If you purchased the battery separately from the computer, contact the battery manufacturer.

    If you recently replaced your battery but your computer hibernates when the battery has a lot of charge remaining (even as much as 90 percent), you might need to uninstall the battery driver, and then restart your computer. Follow these steps:

    1. Click to open Device Manager.Administrator permission required If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

    2. Double-click Batteries.

    3. Right-click Microsoft ACPI-Compliant Control Method Battery, and then click Uninstall.

    4. Restart your computer

     

    Sorry guys, it didnt work for me. Maybe it will work for you
    Monday, June 28, 2010 7:27 PM
  • Last Reply by MSFT to the topic: Sunday, April 18, 2010 4:39 PM

    That shows the incompetence of MS concerning the battery-problem. I followed this thread since February but no step forward has been taken. It seems, that MS won't solve the problem and wait until the users have resigned.

     

    It is fact, that this battery-problem came up since Windows 7. So it is also FACT(!!!) that the battery-problem is a Windows 7 - Problem. Under XP and Vista there were no problems with the battery but with Windows 7.

    Dozends of manufactorers did it wrong but the proper MS everything does it well - shame on you.

     

    MICROSOFT - wake up!! It's YOUR fault!!

     

    Monday, June 28, 2010 9:05 PM
  • YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!, I found the solution to OUR(Meaning Everyone's) PROBLEM!!!!

    This is for Windows 7 Users only!

     

    I see a message that says to "Consider replacing your battery."

    Windows notifies you on the battery meter when your battery gets down to 40 percent of its original capacity (that is, it can only hold 40 percent or less of its designed capacity after it has been charged). This notification is new in Windows 7 —earlier versions of Windows can't notify you when your battery is going bad.

    Picture of battery meter showing a notification that a battery might be going bad

    Battery meter showing a notification that a battery might be going bad

    If you're receiving this message, you probably need to replace your battery. To verify this, contact your computer manufacturer. If you purchased the battery separately from the computer, contact the battery manufacturer.

    If you recently replaced your battery but your computer hibernates when the battery has a lot of charge remaining (even as much as 90 percent), you might need to uninstall the battery driver , and then restart your computer. Follow these steps:

    1. Click to open Device Manager.Administrator permission required  If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

    2. Double-click Batteries .

    3. Right-click Microsoft ACPI-Compliant Control Method Battery , and then click Uninstall .

    4. Restart your computer

     


    It didn't work on my asus F3Sv ...  :-(
    Tuesday, June 29, 2010 1:58 AM
  • If uninstall the battery driver, the battery icon will disappear. So how can we know how many percent of battery left?

    My laptop is ASUS F80S and it just happened recently, after I had installed update for Windows Defender - KB915597. Does this have anything to do with the battery problem?

    Tuesday, June 29, 2010 12:47 PM
  • YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!, I found the solution to OUR(Meaning Everyone's) PROBLEM!!!!

    This is for Windows 7 Users only!

     

    1. Click to open Device Manager.Administrator permission required  If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

    2. Double-click Batteries .

    3. Right-click Microsoft ACPI-Compliant Control Method Battery , and then click Uninstall .

    4. Restart your computer

     

    This is a (known) workaround, but not the solution to this problem.
    Tuesday, June 29, 2010 5:42 PM
  • My ~18 months old vostro 1510 batteries used to last at least 2 hours with XP.

    When I upgraded to 7 yesterday it started complaining about the batteries and lasting ~40min.

    As I've already read about some people with the same HW that have the problem and some that don't, I have the following questions:

    1) Is it supposed to continue damage my batteries? Will it will get worse? Or I can expect to have a 40min batteries from now on?

    2) Is it worth buying a new battery? Or the pair Vostro1510/Win7 will damage it too?

    Thanks!

     

     

    Tuesday, June 29, 2010 11:11 PM
  • 1) I'm pretty sure it will get worse

    2) If you're lucky, the new battery works with Windows 7 but that rarely happens. If it doesn't, the new battery will die too within a few days or weeks

    I've talked to some manufacturers about this problem and there won't be official comments. Some released BIOS updates that might help but they won't say these updates are for Windows 7 because they don't want to support Windows 7 on notebooks that were preinstalled with Vista or XP. Always update to the newest BIOS before installing Windows 7 on a notebook.

    Removing "Microsoft ACPI-Compliant Control Method Battery" won't help, you just won't get a warning if your battery is almost out of power. You'll have a few minutes more time working on battery and then the notebook will simply switch off. But your battery will get worse anyway. For now our solution was to buy a new battery and go back to Vista.

    German readers will find more information here:

    http://www.au-ja.de/artikel-windows-7-problem-mit-notebooks-1.phtml

    We would like to get your feedback since we didn't get any from MS!

    Wednesday, June 30, 2010 8:06 AM
  • Hi Bro! I also having this Problem. my one is Acer 4736z.

    dose your sollution works? did u check?

    i mean...

    YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!, I found the solution to OUR(Meaning Everyone's) PROBLEM!!!!

    This is for Windows 7 Users only!

     

    1. Click to open Device Manager.Administrator permission required  If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

    2. Double-click Batteries .

    3. Right-click Microsoft ACPI-Compliant Control Method Battery , and then click Uninstall .

    4. Restart your computer

     

     

    if works for how long the battery lives?

    thanks in advance.

    Thursday, July 01, 2010 6:56 AM
  • IT DOES NOT WORK!

    We've tried removing "Microsoft ACPI-Compliant Control Method Battery" months ago and what you do is simply removing the battery level low warning. So you're notebook won't shut down with a few percent of battery life left but it will just loose power and data once the battery is depleted. This will give you a few more minutes but the battery will get worse and worse anyway.

    To make it short: It's like switching of the fuel reserve warning in your car.

    Regards,

    Michael

    Friday, July 02, 2010 7:56 AM
  • I left my battery drain, it took >30 minutes until it dropped to 6%, it stopped there and a message appeared saying that I have to plug the AC power in. I left it alone but the laptop hadn't shut down for nearly 30 minutes, what the he-l!?. After 1/2h a message appeared again but I still did nothing, but even the battery totally drained, the pc was still working for more than 15 minutes before shutting down. So what do all of these mean?

    Does it mean this?

    0%                                                                                                                                  100%

    |-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------|

    ███████████████████████████████████████████████████████

    |-----------------------------------------------------------|-------------------------------------------------|

                          Wear (unrecognizable)                   63%                   Recognizable

    Design Capacity       : 49500mWh

    Full Charge Capacity : 17952mWh

    Wear Level               : 63%

     

    I think this means I can charge my battery to 100% but the recognizable capacity is the last ~36%.

    Saturday, July 03, 2010 3:44 PM
  • Most people here don't get what is going on with our batteries.

    Come on guys, get some battery monitoring software (EVEREST, BatteryCare etc) and check your designed capacity / full charge capacity values.

    Windows says "Consider replacing your battery" if the fcc (full charge capacity) is less then 40% of the designed capacity. Designed capacity and fcc both change whenever you plug in the power adapter. It is the mess with this values what causes the appearance of the error message and (have no idea why) the reduced battery life. In my case the designed capacity is often around 730 000 (yes, thousands) which is totally wrong.

    Sometimes this values "change" in such a way that the fcc is greater than 40% of the designed capacity and in that case there's no error message. But don't be naive, it will come back after a few "plugging out / plugging in" 's.

    I guess it is possible that the problem occurs during the installation of W7 because of the use of "wrong" battery drivers. But it won't go back by itself, and there will be no software fix for this.

    We have 2 options: 1. Buy a new battery (those who claim that a new battery became faulty as well in a few days/weeks - did you install W7 with this battery in?). 2. Find a guy / firm who will open the battery and fix the battery's brains (flash a new/fixed firmware so that the battery realizes its elements are actually ok).

    I'm going to go for the latter in a couple weeks. By the way, this way it is also possible to replace the battery's elements with higher capacity ones. It also should be much cheaper than a new battery, though will surely void your warranty in case you still have one.

    Saturday, July 03, 2010 6:14 PM
  • Most people here don't get what is going on with our batteries.

    Come on guys, get some battery monitoring software (EVEREST, BatteryCare etc) and check your designed capacity / full charge capacity values.

    Windows says "Consider replacing your battery" if the fcc (full charge capacity) is less then 40% of the designed capacity. Designed capacity and fcc both change whenever you plug in the power adapter. It is the mess with this values what causes the appearance of the error message and (have no idea why) the reduced battery life. In my case the designed capacity is often around 730 000 (yes, thousands) which is totally wrong.

    Sometimes this values "change" in such a way that the fcc is greater than 40% of the designed capacity and in that case there's no error message. But don't be naive, it will come back after a few "plugging out / plugging in" 's.

    I guess it is possible that the problem occurs during the installation of W7 because of the use of "wrong" battery drivers. But it won't go back by itself, and there will be no software fix for this.

    We have 2 options: 1. Buy a new battery (those who claim that a new battery became faulty as well in a few days/weeks - did you install W7 with this battery in?). 2. Find a guy / firm who will open the battery and fix the battery's brains (flash a new/fixed firmware so that the battery realizes its elements are actually ok).

    I'm going to go for the latter in a couple weeks. By the way, this way it is also possible to replace the battery's elements with higher capacity ones. It also should be much cheaper than a new battery, though will surely void your warranty in case you still have one.

    I think the 2nd option is a great idea coz most of the laptops that have this problem are more than 1 year old, and the batteries are usually 1-year warranted. Well, if this problem aren't fixed, I think I'll replace the battery's elements with new ones coz I need more battery working time.
    Monday, July 05, 2010 9:49 AM
  • I think the 2nd option is a great idea coz most of the laptops that have this problem are more than 1 year old, and the batteries are usually 1-year warranted. Well, if this problem aren't fixed, I think I'll replace the battery's elements with new ones coz I need more battery working time.
    But be careful; you can't just replace the elements, you also need to flash new firmware. And for that, you need special hardware / software, so it's not that easy to do that on your own.
    Monday, July 05, 2010 9:23 PM
  • It's fun to think about Microsoft giving an answer, because what they did was destroy our batteries.

    That means that they should replace everyone's batteries if they assume was their fault. And so, giving a fix to this problem would be also assume their mistake... so, let's hope they assume all the responsability, or at lest they find a way to release a fix without the need of replace everyone's batteries... because they don't want that.

    Thursday, July 08, 2010 10:54 PM
  • What I'm wondering now is why hasn't anyone filed a law suit against Microsoft yet? Doesn't anyone have any hard evidence?
    Friday, July 09, 2010 12:15 AM
  • The only software fix that could be released is the one that PREVENTS W7 from destroying good batteries; there will be NO fix for the messed up ones cause the problem is in battery's brains, and it remains if you switch to another OS.
    Friday, July 09, 2010 9:53 AM
  • Since upgrading to W7 from XP (about two weeks ago) my battery charge/discharge does is not performing correctly.   I was reliably getting approximately 1:45 of life per charge on the batter before the W7 upgrade.  Now it only lasts about 15min. 
     
    On discharge, it will show 100%, then 99%, then rather quickly drop to around 7%-10%, and then shutdown the computer. 
     
    On the last recharge, the meter initially showed 3% and charging, after about 15 min. it showed 4%, and then in about 2-3 minutes, showed 100% charged. 
     
    It does appear that the design capacity is being reported incorrectly (see below).  Note, this report is generated AFTER the recharge cycle mentioned just above. 
     
    The battery itself is labelled 4000mah.  The battery is PA3399u-2brs
     
    System details etc. are as follows
     
    Computer:  Toshiba Sattelite A105-s4004.  
     
    OS:  W7 Home Premium, fully updated, from a clean install
    BIOS:  V6 (most recent)
     
    Battery Info Reported by powercfg - engergy:
     
    Battery:Battery Information
    Battery ID D6FEPA3399U-2BAS/BRS
    Manufacturer  
    Serial Number D6FE
    Chemistry Li-i
    Long Term 1
    Design Capacity 960690
    Last Full Charge 960690
     
     
    Saturday, July 10, 2010 9:51 PM
  • About a couple of weeks ago, I checked my battery wear level - it was 44% after the upgrade. Now 3 weeks later, the wear level is 77%. The battery lasts about 1h 15mins - I wonder what will happen in a month. I had a look in the registry ACPI and couldnt really find anything there of any significance. I wonder why MS wont give us an answer.

    Sunday, July 11, 2010 6:06 AM
  • this problem is such bullcrap. my computer was perfectly fine on vista sp2. my laptop is less than 2 years old and i know the battery hasn't been drained yet.  I have another laptop with a 3 year old battery that still lasts 3 hours on xp so this windows 7 ____ needs to be fixed now. spending 120 dollars for a new battery is unacceptable.

     

    my brothers macbook never has these kind of problems

    Monday, July 12, 2010 10:22 AM

  • Solution - install Linux.  (Yes, I know, I know.  Before I get flamed, let me say that I have 2 machines here running Vista, 1 XP and 2 Win 7  And a MacBook Pro I just bought to replace my Thinkpad T43.  And I think Win 7 is great, other than the battery problem they disavow.)

    My eeePC had the battery problem after installing Win7 last winter.  I replaced the battery, and soon had the problem again.  I installed EasyPeasy Linux - no more battery problem.  But for several reasons I didn't much like EasyPeasy and quit using the eeePC.  On a whim I just installed Ubuntu Netbook Remix 10.4.  I like it a lot better, and am using the netbook again.

    But guess what!  Every once in a while, Ubuntu tells me my battery is "broken."

    The big difference:  Ubuntu doesn't shut down the PC like Win 7 did.  It lets me keep running. And running. 3+ hours on a charge.

    Solution to the battery problem:  Install Ubuntu.  Or fork over many $$ for a MacBook Pro.  Best laptop I've ever owned, but it sure is expensive.

    bill martin

    Tuesday, July 13, 2010 2:23 AM
  • Ive got 2 identical HP DV9700 Series Laptops, One with vista and one with windows 7 - Both with original batterys. The one with windows 7 I got off ebay, where the seller had upgraded to Windows 7- and I checked the Wear level - It was 44% 3 weeks ago. Guess what now, The wear level is 80%!!! (according to HWMonitor) with the battery lasting 1h. The one with vista (Manufactured 15 days earlier - still running on the original battery) lasts about 2 hours!!!

     

    So, Will microsoft fork out £60 for the battery, becuase im certainley not paying for it. This is a joke. Whats the point of a laptop if the OS will eat the battery within 2 months??

    Tuesday, July 13, 2010 7:34 AM
  • Me too.

    HP DV2810.

    Was going to buy a new battery but wait in hope for a fix from Microsoft...

    Pull your finger out Bill!

     

    Friday, July 16, 2010 9:19 AM
  • I have the exact same problem. Perfectly good battery lasting hours, update to Windows 7, battery now lasts about 2 minutes literally when not plugged in to the mains. It's ridiculous, and disgusting that Microsoft are denying a problem and ignoring threads like this one.
    Friday, July 16, 2010 11:07 PM
  • Hi there,

    Sorry about any English mistakes (I´m from Brazil and it's been a long time since i've last used my English). The thing is: right at this moment, I'm waiting for my brand new HP pav. to arrive in my home... with the Windows 7 already installed on it. After reading all this messages, the wait for my new notebook is becoming less and less exciting. Anyway, I've already payed for it, and it WILL come with the W7.

    This brings me to my question: do I have a chance do replace the OS before that battery issue? In theory, how much time do I have (yes, I'm that worried!) ?! Has anyone gone through this kind of situation??

    I'm thinking about using the W. vista... When we buy a notebook, the implied message is: "we need agility". Can't take the risk of buying a desktop for the price of a notebook!

    Thanks, and good luck for you all (hopping I won't join the statistics of W7 damages).

    Monday, July 19, 2010 7:05 PM
  • Helpful Jeremy, thanks.

    However its very disappointing how long this is going on.

    Samsung Q70. Upgrade to W7 32 bit. Battery stone dead in about 3 weeks.

    Whats the latest date for sp1? And whats the latest word from MS? Have they acknowleged their 'blame' yet?

    Getting more miserable about this. And i refuse to 'buy'another batt.

    Monday, July 19, 2010 10:37 PM
  • same problem here HP dv6000
    Monday, July 19, 2010 11:02 PM
  • I have the same problem here on ASUS X83VB-X1.  Oddly enough I can charge the battery longer in Ubuntu and the battery lasts longer.  Windows 7 doesn't seem like it killing my battery, but that it is incorrectly reporting the charge and the charge capacity. 
    Wednesday, July 21, 2010 3:06 AM
  • I have a Acer TravelMate 6292. Received the message to change the battery. Bought a new battery which lasted 2 days before I started gtting the message again.

    Microsoft really needs to sort this problem out.

    Can't do presenatations on my laptop and this is seriously affecting my livelyhood.

    Wednesday, July 21, 2010 9:08 PM
  • Hi

    Good, you've held off upgrading the Dell Laptop. Mine is Dell Inspiron 1545 and I've been getting this message for the last two days. My set (and battery) is exactly 9 months old, much too early for me to replace battery.

    Thursday, July 22, 2010 6:15 AM
  • I have a Packard Bell MH36 Laptop and using Windows 7, I never had any problems with the battery before but about a week ago I plugged my charger into my laptop and turned it on. When Windows started I noticed the battery icon had an X on it and said "consider replacing your battery".

    I wanted to avoid buying a new battery incase that would not solve my problem, I wiped the metal prongs on the charger's plug (It wasn't really clean because about 50% of the time I put in the plug when the mains is on i can see or hear a spark) and also changed the fuse.

    I was suprised that when I plugged it in my laptop the error message dissapeared! (Weird)

    I don't think it will work for everyone but it did for me .

    Thursday, July 22, 2010 2:14 PM
  • Nice try.

    I did Microsoft ACPI-Compliant Control Method Battery uninstall following the instructions in an email from an MS customer service tech.  Not only didn't it help, it immediately dropped my remaining battery life from 45 minutes to less than 10 minutes.


    EPIC FAIL!

    And btw, all you MS techs who are sending out the generic cut and paste message with the lengthy instructions to

     

          a) Click Start, type "device manager" (without the quotes), and then press ENTER.

          b) Left click on Batteries to expand the entries listed below it. You should now see an entry similar to

              "Microsoft ACPI-Complient Control Method Battery"

          c) Right click on Microsoft ACPI-Complient Control Method Battery and click Uninstall.

          d) When prompted click OK. e) Restart your computer. This will reinstall your battery. In the process it will

              reset the Power Options for your battery to default settings.

     

    For the record, it's spelled ACPI-CompliA nt, not the ACPI-CompliE nt.   It makes you look even more incompetent to send the same misspelled instructions to thousands of pissed off customers.  At least fix the spelling if you can't fix the problem.

    Friday, July 23, 2010 7:03 AM
  • probably related:

    http://www-307.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss/MIGR-75738.html


    ________________ drahnier
    Friday, July 23, 2010 9:06 AM
  • Nice try.

    I did Microsoft ACPI-Compliant Control Method Battery uninstall following the instructions in an email from an MS customer service tech.  Not only didn't it help, it immediately dropped my remaining battery life from 45 minutes to less than 10 minutes.


    EPIC FAIL!

    And btw, all you MS techs who are sending out the generic cut and paste message with the lengthy instructions to

     

          a) Click Start, type "device manager" (without the quotes), and then press ENTER.

          b) Left click on Batteries to expand the entries listed below it. You should now see an entry similar to

              "Microsoft ACPI-Complient Control Method Battery"

          c) Right click on Microsoft ACPI-Complient Control Method Battery and click Uninstall.

          d) When prompted click OK. e) Restart your computer. This will reinstall your battery. In the process it will

              reset the Power Options for your battery to default settings.

     

    For the record, it's spelled ACPI-CompliA nt, not the ACPI-CompliE nt.   It makes you look even more incompetent to send the same misspelled instructions to thousands of pissed off customers.  At least fix the spelling if you can't fix the problem.


    Nope this didn't work for me either. At least you got an email, I've emailed Microsoft twice and posted on here, haven't heard a whistle.

     

    Lucky IBM Thinkpad users, I wonder if Acer are working on anything. I'm not using Windows again until somebody does something. I even refused to buy a Microsoft mouse & keyboard the other day cos they've pee'd me off too much.

    Friday, July 23, 2010 5:44 PM
  • This is ridiculous. Still tethered to my power cable and can't even read my morning news on the john without it cutting off! This is quite pathetic, but nothing tops Microsoft's defensive lack of response to this.

    To those backing Microsoft in this claim, please hear this simple logic. You say its not Microsoft's fault because they are using updated technology to read batteries in which these 'outdated' laptops cannot adhere to. The major fault in this is WHY OFFER AN UPGRADE? Isn't it obvious people are upgrading previous versions of windows, therefore obviously outdated in terms of this new OS. I bought my laptop only months before Win7 started becoming the preinstalled OS so I don't want to hear anything about why they can't bridge a gap of several weeks. Maybe the fault is in the BIOS, I'm not arguing that, but as the largest software developer in the world there is simply no excuse.

    I'm sick and tired of this, I don't have my Vista CD anymore, but if there was a fat warning label on Windows 7 saying there may be a chance this version is incompatible with your system maybe I would have kept the thing. Microsoft, screw you, seriously. I sat outside of Target the day your Xbox 360 came out for 9 hours in subfreezing temperatures only to get held up at knife point upon leaving the store. I ended up getting it back and had it break on me a month later. I am on my FOURTH Xbox due to the 3 ring problem and I have a feeling the same problem is looming on this, they've assured me the next one is on me. I've been a faithful customer since Windows 3.2, and honestly you have shown me absolutely NO reason why I should stick with your brand. On the contrary I am just left of waging all out war with you and convincing everyone to move a different route. You're taking advantage of one of the most important customer bases right now and making fools of all of us. We've been shouting and complaining into a black hole for over a year now. Your OS is good but customer service ____ poor and your reaction to this is nothing above pathetic. You're losing the ones who helped get the company where its at now. For lack of a better phrase, and lack of a better reason to find one: SCREW YOU.

    Saturday, July 24, 2010 1:09 PM
  • Another link for Lenovo users here:

    http://www-307.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss/BATT-082009.html


    This page provides a diagnostic tool to identify affected batteries and indicate whether they qualify for free replacement.

    The diagnostic message that I got from the tool was:

    "Thank you for using the Lenovo Battery Diagnostic Tool. Your battery is not eligible for replacement because it is more than 12 months beyond the battery warranty expiration date".


    No use for me now, but that does suggest that they might replace batteries for a year after the warranty expires. It makes me more inclined to risk my replacement battery with Win7.

    Hope that helps someone.

    pjfletch


    Tuesday, July 27, 2010 6:33 PM
  • That Bit of software was showing me I had 44% wear about 3 weeks ago. I tried Damian18's post, before I had 89% wear but now I have 80%. I dont know whats going on. Photobucket
    Wednesday, July 28, 2010 10:17 AM
  • Update - I "fixed" my HP DV2404ca battery by using a Fedora Core live boot cd. After booting in Windows 7, it charged my battery to what it thought was 100% in about 10 minutes. I then booted Linux from the live CD and checked the battery status. It said 100%, but when i looked in the battery info file (/proc/battery/bat0/state) it said it was about 1/4 of the designed capacity. I removed the power adapter and allowed the battery to run to empty (it ran for about 2 hours before shutting off, the second hour of which was past "0%" of course). Then, I booted linux and charged the battery to 100%. It took over an hour to charge, as it had under Windows Vista. WHen I checked the battery status again, it had charged it to the full design capacity of the battery.

     

    This is clearly a compatibility issue between Windows 7's battery management and the BIOS on some laptops.

    Wednesday, July 28, 2010 3:37 PM
  • I've downgraded my old laptop back to xp and bought another battery. Seems to be working back to normal. My gf is using that as her main computer now.

    My new machine doesn't seem to have the battery issue.

    This is a lesson for everyone. Don't bother purchasing an OS upgrade on an existing machine. People got screwed with Vista, (that whole vista capable logo and the ultimate edition joke) and now its happened again with 7.

    I'm still waiting for the mac pc parody on this.

    Thursday, July 29, 2010 1:47 AM
  • I think I know how to reverse the damage so Windows 7 reads the battery more accuratley. Someone please give this a try. It might be a fluke, or it might be the solutuon.

    A couple of things:

    1. Using the Liveboot CD Idea, I realised that the battery lasts longer in Fedora than in Windows7.

    2. After disabling the ACPI, discharging the battery completley, and monitoring the battery wear level, it looks like it has been reduced. (According to CPUID Hardware Monitor also known as HWMonitor - Google search and run that program)

     

    Right, Step 1.FULLY CHARGE BATTERY AND TAKE A SCREENSHOT OF YOUR CURRENT BATTERY WEAR. For this, please install the HWMonitor program. Google search this, and find it and run the program. Take a screenshot of the result. (Should look like this) Photobucket Step 2. DISABLE THE ACPI Simple. Click start, type device manager, then press enter. find the "Batteries" bit, locate ACPI, (as in screenshot) then disable it. Photobucket Step 3: LEAVE YOUR COMPUTER ON ITS OWN. Let it run down.

     

    Step 4: CHECK IF THE WEAR LEVEL IS LOWER. Check and report back to me. It looks like it worked for me. (Look at my previous post with 81% wear and now its 72%)  

     

     

    Im not 100% sure if this will work. it may only work on HP DV series laptops, or I might of found the solution. Im still power cycling the battery with that process to see if it works

     

    Many Thanks

     

    Aman

    Thursday, July 29, 2010 9:45 AM
  • Nope, The post doesnt work. Sorry people. My battery went from 72 to 76%. I guess im going to have to fork out for a new battery.
    Thursday, July 29, 2010 1:44 PM
  • Many of the ACER and other laptops have a proceedure to "correct" the battery memory information. I ran into this with a netbook as well as an HP laptop.  In one case, the battery was discharged beyond the lower limit set into the laptops charging circuitry. LI batteries and all that. What I ended up doing was charging the battery with a programmable Li battery charger designed for radio control models to get the battery back into service. Initially, much to my suprise, the laptop did not recognize the fully charged battery properly. Further investigation and some poking around on the ACER international web site disclosed that there was a key press sequence that could be used during the boot process. Turned out that the ability to reset or ignore the battery data is a part of the BIOS on at least some laptops.

    The problems in doing this sort of thing:

    Identifying the appropriate battery pins to use. This is non trivial, as the pins include direct access to the "real" battery pins, as well as other pins used for monitoring, and probably access to the battery memory.

    Next, the charge rate must be limited to "1C"or less 1/10C is usually OK if full battery specs are not known.  LI batteries can have high discharge rates, but the charge rate is limited to much less than the maximum safe discharge rate.

    The battery charge voltage must also be limited, thus the charger must be capable of controlling the voltage as well as the current.

    There is enough variation in laptops that the Mfr's unique info must be looked at. Some third party utilities for laptops have the ability to monitor and correct the battery information. 

     

       

    Thursday, July 29, 2010 4:44 PM
  • Upgraded Windows Vista Basic on an Acer Aspire 5515 to Windows 7 Ultimate (32-bit to 32-bit)

    Yesterday, battery life was at least one hour. Today it is about 10 minutes.

    I'm surprised at how much this reality of this issue is being debated. Don't get me wrong, skepticism is my primary M.O., but there is an overwhelming body of supporting evidence here.

    I guess the purpose of this post is just to add one more voice (and piece of evidence) to the mass.

    Thursday, August 05, 2010 1:19 AM
  • Upgraded Windows Vista Basic on an Acer Aspire 5515 to Windows 7 Ultimate (32-bit to 32-bit)

    Yesterday, battery life was at least one hour. Today it is about 10 minutes.

    I'm surprised at how much this reality of this issue is being debated. Don't get me wrong, skepticism is my primary M.O., but there is an overwhelming body of supporting evidence here.

    I guess the purpose of this post is just to add one more voice (and piece of evidence) to the mass.


    Welcome to the club!!!
    Thursday, August 05, 2010 7:53 AM
  • I too have the same problem here. But mine is different.

    i was using my laptop plugged-in when its batters is around 36%.A sudden power flux happened at my house resulting my battery to show 100% immediately. After a restart, the windows found that error and asking me to replace the battery.

     

    "Battery ID Hewlett-PackardPrimary
    Design Capacity 55080
    Last Full Charge 20045
    Last Full Charge (%) 36 "

    I think that if i change the "Last Full Charge" value, the problem would be rectified.

    I request u ppl to tell me a way with which i could change that value.

    Thursday, August 05, 2010 8:29 AM
  • Hi Damian18,

    What you suggested worked for me.

    Thanks a lot.

    My system:

    ACER Aspire 4715z

    Friday, August 06, 2010 10:43 AM
  • I think I know how to reverse the damage so Windows 7 reads the battery more accuratley. Someone please give this a try. It might be a fluke, or it might be the solutuon.

    A couple of things:

    1. Using the Liveboot CD Idea, I realised that the battery lasts longer in Fedora than in Windows7.

    2. After disabling the ACPI, discharging the battery completley, and monitoring the battery wear level, it looks like it has been reduced. (According to CPUID Hardware Monitor also known as HWMonitor - Google search and run that program)

     

    Right, Step 1.FULLY CHARGE BATTERY AND TAKE A SCREENSHOT OF YOUR CURRENT BATTERY WEAR. For this, please install the HWMonitor program. Google search this, and find it and run the program. Take a screenshot of the result. (Should look like this) Photobucket Step 2. DISABLE THE ACPI Simple. Click start, type device manager, then press enter. find the "Batteries" bit, locate ACPI, (as in screenshot) then disable it. Photobucket Step 3: LEAVE YOUR COMPUTER ON ITS OWN. Let it run down.

     

    Step 4: CHECK IF THE WEAR LEVEL IS LOWER. Check and report back to me. It looks like it worked for me. (Look at my previous post with 81% wear and now its 72%)  

     

     

    Im not 100% sure if this will work. it may only work on HP DV series laptops, or I might of found the solution. Im still power cycling the battery with that process to see if it works

     

    Many Thanks

     

    Aman

    I had the same idea as yours and tried it the whole last month, but the result was like... a mess! Sometimes my wear level reduced but sometimes it increased and now it's 72.31% (61.40% at the first time I used HWMonitor and 82.73% yesterday). At first I thought this would work but this seems to be just a workaround.
    Monday, August 09, 2010 6:22 PM
  • Hi,

    I have the same problem and symptoms as described by Rosiebs_Dad in "Part 9" of this thread. I have a Windows 7 Ultimate x64 (English version), patched with yesterday's big patch batch. Yesterday I took the notebook from the office and worked on the train like I am used to, and I got home without running out the battery. This morning I started the computer, usually the battery lasts until I get back to the office and it still has some juice left. This morning however, the battery did not last the full trip. Well, never mind I thought, I'll just plug in when I arrive and that's it.

    However, when I did plug the notebook, I noticed a new message shown by Windows: "Consider replacing your battery". I should mention that I have run out of power before, and Windows has done emergency shutdowns before with this notebook (I've had it for a little more than a year), but this is the first time I have seen this message.

    It could be natural battery degradation, but it happened suspiciously close to a Windows update and kb981200 does suggest updates can cause this message to appear. Plus my symptoms seem also suspiciously similar to those of other people here. So, is it that I didn't get the message before because the update was missing, or that the message I get now is bogus?

    I can give technical details if needed. BatteryCare reports "wear level" as 61%. This is all very confusing. Please advise.

    • Edited by Guillaume-R Friday, August 13, 2010 6:54 AM 2 missing words
    Friday, August 13, 2010 6:53 AM
  • Hi,

    I updated from Vista to Windows 7 on an Acer 5536G. Went from 1.5 hours to less than 2 mins. All operating systems report a damaged battery (Win7 reinstalled, Vista reinstalled, Ubuntu and multiple other linux distros). I have replaced the battery once, however after circa 1 week, the same thing happened (and multiple operating systems identified the battery as damaged again). The only way to describe the situating is in saying that windows 7 destroys batteries. I am guessing Win7 misidentifies battery and charges it with too much current.

    Needless to say I will avoid Microsoft products from here on out; my question now is simply whether I can do anything but throw my two (rather new) dead batteries?

    Cheers,

    Lawry 

    Sunday, August 15, 2010 7:48 AM
  • So, I just wanted to bump this thread and show MS I'm still here from a couple pages back. My battery doesn't last for sh*t anymore.

     

    I've been reading on here about how it's most likely the firmware in the memory of the battery is incompatible with Windows 7? Do they make batteries now that ARE compatible with windows 7? because some of these guys have bought new batteries and are still getting the same problem. Is it impossible for a utility to be written that will reset the batteries memory or flash it with and upgraded firmware? I can't imagine the actual physical components of my battery are shot....the thing is brand NEW! if its just a memory/firmware problem there has to be some way to reset that particular component of the battery if the rest is good. I can't imagine throwing away the battery for something like that.

    Obviously if this was easy, it would have been taken care of by now. Can someone please educate me on my questions above?

    I'm was so happy with my new laptop. 64bit Windows7, 3Gb ram, SSHD, etc. This PC is FAST and to have my Ferrari of a laptop just sitting here, crippled, because of such a RETARDED problem is ridiculous.

    Monday, August 16, 2010 10:52 PM
  • Would using the original OS fix my battery?
    Monday, August 16, 2010 10:57 PM
  • As much as I would hate to switch to Vista, I might try it just to see if it actually will recharge the battery 100%.

     

    Hows this for a thought. I like Windows 7, but not Vista. What if I had a dual boot set-up and used Vista to recharge the battery, but use Windows 7 as my main OS. I could recharge the battery using Vista while I'm at work and possibly run my laptop on W7 while I'm at home. I used my laptop for a full year (on W7) before I got the battery error, so who knows how long it'll be before that error returns. Of course, this would still be kinda of a PITA and who knows if using the original OS will fix the battery anyway. Also, didn't I read somewhere above that W7 doesn't play nice when dual booting?

    Vegan, you say no one got back to you on whether or not using the original OS fixed the battery? How's about this. Give me a day to back-up all my files (and find my recovery disks) and I'll test it out and get back to you.

     

     

    Monday, August 16, 2010 11:20 PM
  • I'm just gonna install Vista first without the dual boot. I just wanna see if it repairs the battery. If my results are positive, I'll set up the dual boot and see how it works in that case.
    Monday, August 16, 2010 11:35 PM
  • Will do
    Monday, August 16, 2010 11:40 PM
  • Ok, so I'm running Vista now (just installed it a couple hours ago) and no battery error. I'll be unplugging the powercord and running on battery, so we'll see how long it holds up. I'll let the battery drain entirely as well and see how it handles after I give it another full charge.

     

    edit: I unplugged the power cord and went to take a shower. I came back about 10 minutes later and my battery is already down to 50%.

    Thursday, August 19, 2010 3:09 AM
  • Hei guys.

    This is my case, my notebook Acer Aspire 5738-6922 (not original BIOS version updated to v1.06) and after running W7 for 3 months, it shows the same error. But my friend, that have an Acer Aspire 5738-6294 (original BIOS version v1.16) running W7 never had any problems with the battery. Then I guess the problem is with the bios of some notebooks. See above:

    "The Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) firmware does not correctly initialize and report the Design Capacity field of the static battery information structure that is retrieved by using the _BIF method . Therefore, the Design Capacity that is reported to Windows may be much larger than the Last Full Charge capacity that is also reported in the static battery information structure. The Windows Battery Meter divides the Last Full Charge capacity by the Design Capacity to determine battery health. The Windows Battery Meter displays the "Consider replacing your battery" message when the Last Full Charge Capacity is less than 40% of the Design Capacity. When this issue occurs, the Design Capacity is reported as much larger than Last Full Charge capacity. Therefore, the "Consider replacing your battery" message is always shown."

    Then I ask to all: Can I use the BIOS v.1.16 downloaded by Acer site's drivers to model Aspire 5740 almost equal the mine model ?

     

    Thanks for that.

    Death Boy

    Thursday, August 19, 2010 8:33 PM
  • Yeah, installing Vista didn't have any affect on the battery. It died in under 10 minutes. Back to the drawing board
    Thursday, August 19, 2010 10:51 PM
  • I Have The solution!!....

    i'll make a fix program... and i'll try sell to Microsoft... microsoft  will put on "Windows Update" for all with this issue 

    thanks. cya

    Friday, August 20, 2010 2:29 AM
  • I have posted before on this and have had a few emails back and forth with Microsoft. I have a Dell Inspiron 1720 and as of today I have lost my 4th battery. Good thing is it is still under warranty. I am shipping it back tomorrow.

    I never had any trouble with batteries the entire time I was running the Beta for Win7 or Vista and since the RTM I have lost 4 batteries. Something changed between the Beta and RTM.

    Dell is no help since they never offered Windows 7 on this model so they will not even discuss it. The Microsoft compatability test showed no issues for upgrading this laptop.

    I think that Microsoft needs to get this issue fixed very soon and not ignore us like they keep doing.

    Friday, August 20, 2010 7:04 AM
  • Dcgtls.....YOU ARE LUCKY!! Still under warranty.

     

    Im sure for about 95% of people, they are not under warranty, Including me, Im using a 2yr old Pavilion dv9700

     

    So far we have established this:

    1. Going back to vista doesnt work (thanks for testing MagnumTripod23)

    2. Disabling ACPI Doesnt fix it (Thanks to a lot more people inc Me)

    3. Using LiveCD doesnt work

    4. It MAY be a Bios problem in some notebooks

    5. The batteries may have more capacity than reported - Windows May not be reading the battery properley.

    6. Its PURELEY annoying.

     

    Im going to ask HP Support on this - This may be a long ride.

    Friday, August 20, 2010 8:10 AM
  • Dcgtls.....YOU ARE LUCKY!! Still under warranty.

     

    You missunderstood. Dell does not warranty the battery beyond a year. I had the original 6 cell battery die about Dec or Jan. and went and bought a new 9 cell which died within 2 months. I did not have time to wait on the RMA so bought another 9 cell while I was waiting for the RMA to process so now own 2 9 cell batteries. I went about 2 months and that one died, luckily I had the one that I had RMA'ed and now yesterday the 4th one died. The 2 9 cell batteries are from different companies and luckily both have a 3 year warranty on them.

    I am just glad that I did not spend almost $200 each for them direct from Dell or I would be very upset, moreso than I am.

    So here I am in about an 8 month period of time and have gone thru 4 batteries. I have laptops that still have the original batteries that are working fine that are running XP and are about 6 - 7 years old. This laptop originaly had Vista HP 32 and I upgraded to Vista HP 64 with no issues, upgraded to Win 7 x64 Beta for almost a year with no problem and then in less than 2 months after installing Win 7 x64 RTM I went from having about 3 hour life to completly dead and I just keep killing them.

    I am seriously thinking of putting Vista back on it and forgetting about Win 7 on my laptop.  No problems with Win 7 on any of my desktops so they will all stay there.

    Saturday, August 21, 2010 4:10 AM
  • I wanted to get a consensus from those still constantly checking this site for updates. How many of you have replaced your power supplies for the laptops in question? I'm still sure Microsoft is at fault for this when you get down to the root, however I was tracing back the history of my own problems. Over last holiday I broke the tip of my OE power supply, it took about a month for me to get a new one, which was aftermarket, and during that time the battery died from uses here and there while waiting. I went and checked and it seems that the power information is as follows:

    Battery:

    DC 10.8V   6000mAh

    Replacement AC Adapter:

    Output: 19V 4.74A

     

    I am unfamiliar with the effects, if any, because of this mismatch in power, but would like some insight as to what some others have experienced. My battery wear is at 95.3, considerably higher than some I've seen posting, I'm wondering if this has furthered the situation.

     

    Vegan Fanatic, sorry but you seem to be playing one side against the other...sympathizing with us yet telling us the fault doesn't lie within Microsoft. The undoubted logic is how on earth could you release an OS UPGRADE (which I hope we can agree that the laptops to be upgraded would have to be at least slightly dated, yes?) when the company knew of a problem brewing with their later RC releases. As many pro M$ statements you can give us the logic defeats all. Evidence shows they were aware of this problem last June, there is absolutely no reason for how this has been handled. It says in your sig that you are well studied in IT. I minored in IT and had the privilege to work alongside many a smart mind, ALL of whom will agree that although problems arise when switching iterations of operating systems none have been as serious and as widespread as this one. Professors and graduates alike we've spent many hours debating this and with their heightened prowess given the situation have resolved that Microsoft is to blame, in either not adhering to 'outdated' bios specs or just plain assumed ignorance. Either way they have made fools of us all.

    I have been building computers since 3.2 and haven't stopped since. I've used literally every Windows release since and done over 50 upgrades to both laptops and desktops, never seen a problem like this. I do not mean to gouge at you but sometimes you present yourself as a M$ associate. Just wondering what part you're playing!

    Saturday, August 21, 2010 8:37 PM
  • Guys (and gals),

    Was just reading over some of the posts in this (extremely long) topic because I recently replaced the battery in my Compaq TC4200 Tablet (bought it used with a bunk dead battery). I began implementing the possible fix mentioned earlier (the "powercfg -setdcvalueindex SCHEME_CURRENT SUB_BATTERY BATACTIONCRIT 0" idea) and noticed something in the Power Options under the Advanced settings. My "Critical battery level -> On battery" was set to 98% (!!!) and "Low battery level -> On battery" was set to 99%! Once I changed those to more respectable values (15% for low and 10% for critical), the red "X" on my battery meter went away. Just a thought, but check those values on your systems, especially if you have replaced the battery recently, and make sure those settings are set to sane levels. Hopefully that will help some of you. I just wish I knew of a way to make Win7 not adjust those values as it sees fit, as it appears to be causing problems in a least some cases. Thanks, and good luck!

     

    -Axemann
    Tuesday, August 24, 2010 4:34 AM
  • (DISCLAIMER: I haven't read the whole thread. I don't know if this works. I'm just trying to find a solution, although I can't try any of it myself.)

    Given that going back to Vista won't help some people, and getting a new battery doesn't change anything for some people, it makes me think that some faulty data must be stored in BIOS in some computers, and that this is sent to BIOS by W7.

    I see different kind of situations:

    -A- No problems installing Windows 7

    -B- Battery performance gets worse after installing Windows 7, but going back to Vista will make the battery work as expected again.

    -C- Battery performance gets worse after installing Windows 7, and going back to Vista won't help.

    So there are different degrees of Windows 7 support in the BIOS, where -A- got full support (duh), and -C- is the worst.

    After a -C- laptop have been used with Windows 7, the faulty data can't be altered again because of lacking support or a bug (and that's why other batteries fails too, even with some other OS). This could explain why disabling ACPI worked with some laptops (those are -B- laptops), but not for others (-C- laptops).

     

    So how do we prevent W7 from sending data that makes the battery go bad? Prevent the W7 ACPI from getting in contact with the battery.

    Here's an idea for those who are about to:

    - install W7 for the first time on a computer

    - install W7 on a -B- laptop that's currently running an OS which works well with the battery (ie you can't just reinstall W7).

    1 - Remove battery

    2 - Install W7

    3 - Disable ACPI

    4 - Reboot

    5 - Insert battery

     

    For -C- laptops that already have been installed with W7 there are only two things to try before doing 1 - 5:

    0 - remove power cord and battery and clear CMOS for one minute at least, and restore defaults in BIOS.

    I'm not saying that this will save the -C- laptops, but I don't know any other way to remove data stored in BIOS, actually I'm pretty doubtful that these actions will do the trick. But I guess it's worth a try.

     

    Three other ideas if the above doesn't work:

    - If it turns out that ACPI must be prevented from getting in contact with BIOS, not battery - use system image with ACPI disabled.

       Or, make a custom W7 install iso with ACPI diasbled, maybe with imagex.

    - Make a W7 install iso with (what ?) files from BETA or Vista. WFP or similar will probably be a PITA.

     

     

      What do you think? Am I crazy or just stupid? :D

    Friday, August 27, 2010 3:14 AM
  • Well I caved and finally paid $35 for an aftermarket replacement battery for my fiancee's Acer Extensa 5620.  Thank god this one seems to work with Win7.  It is still wrong that MS refuses to fix this, but in the meantime we have a $35 workaround.  This is the battery in case somebody else has the same Acer laptop (sounds like it works for a variety of other Acer models):

    http://www.amazon.com/Battery-TravelMate-LC-BTP00-005-LC-BTP00-006-LIP6219VPC/dp/B002WFN82S/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

    I will continue following this thread and if somebody ever forces MS's hand to make this right, I will still collect on it and hopefully recover my $35.

    Sunday, August 29, 2010 1:12 AM
  • hey people look at this

    i have an hp pavilion dv4, i upgraded from vista 32bits to 7x64 6months ago, so, my batterywas  f*cked up

    then i stole a new one, (YES I STOLE IT FROM AN HP STORE BECAUSE IM NOT GONNA PAY FOR A ****  I DIDN'T HARM) and few days later, the capacity of the batt changed from 47520mWh (2 and a half hour) to 42000, it was scrubbing again.... BUT by chance i visited www.hp.com and there was a new BIOS release for my pc, (2010-07-23 ) and i tried that and my battery didn´t back to full capacity BUT STOPPED DRAINING,

    now, 2 months later, my battery still works fine, it has been recharged 84 times and runs about 2:30 hours, so CHEK FOR ANY BIOS UPDATE.

    Sunday, September 05, 2010 10:09 PM
  • I have posted before on this and have had a few emails back and forth with Microsoft. I have a Dell Inspiron 1720 and as of today I have lost my 4th battery. Good thing is it is still under warranty. I am shipping it back tomorrow.

    I never had any trouble with batteries the entire time I was running the Beta for Win7 or Vista and since the RTM I have lost 4 batteries. Something changed between the Beta and RTM.

    Dell is no help since they never offered Windows 7 on this model so they will not even discuss it. The Microsoft compatability test showed no issues for upgrading this laptop.

    I think that Microsoft needs to get this issue fixed very soon and not ignore us like they keep doing.

    Since Microsoft don't give a c.rap about this issue, wouldn't it make sense to try and track down the betas for Windows 7? Then we can extract the ACPI drivers, and thus create a set of various versions of the driver. I'm sure this would give us some ACPI drivers that actually work in Windows 7 without destroying batteries.

    I'm actually more amazed someone hasn't begun a class action lawsuit against MS. Apple have had some lawsuits brought against them by various peoples and it's worked over there.

    One wonders if something else nefarious is going on here. Maybe this is some sort of anti piracy scheme MS introduced that inadvertently affected legitimate customers as well. It's not the first time one of their fool proof schemes failed badly. MS's silence on this issue is very curious indeed and I think points towards this quite possibly not being a bug at all. In my now 20 years of working in IT, I've seen some very creative ways where companies screw with peoples computers where their software has been pirated.

    Don't misunderstand me, I'm not accusing anyone here of piracy, rather stating it's not out of the question for MS to have some sneaky code in Win7 that's gotten off the leash so to speak. Thus it's not distinguishing who is legit or not.

    And if it's a bug, then in the grand scheme of things MS are incompetent bumbling fools. We're talking about battery charging here, not sending someone to the moon.

    Monday, September 06, 2010 3:31 AM
  • Notebooks are far from the standardized machines that desktops are. For that reason drivers are far harder to find for new versions of Windows. This is intentional as notebook vendors would like to sell you a new machine.

    This is why the the battery, among other components are such an issue.

     


    Vote if answered or helpful, I am running for Office (joke)! IT/Developer, Windows/Linux/Mainframe I also am a true vegan and I am very good with economics and I used to play chess at 2400++ I have lots of papers on my site for power supplies and video card problems, see the resources section
    Monday, September 06, 2010 3:35 AM
  • Notebooks are far more standardized than you imply. The chipsets used are commone amongy many familes, brands and models of notebooks. LG, HP and ACER don't make the chipsets in their notebooks, Intel, NVidia and AMD do. The chips used for Wifi, Networking, Sound and other functions all pretty much come from companies well know and have used before. A battery isn't rocket science here, it's been a factor in notebooks and laptops for 20 years now.

    Microsoft doesn't supply 101 different ACPI drivers in their Windows 7 retail DVD. They have but one or two based on what version of Windows you are running (x86, 64 etc.) When I referred to finding and using the ACPI drivers from the Windows 7 betas, again it's not 101 different flavors, it's one or two at most. Then depending on what beta you have, you might have a different file version of this driver file(s).

    Sorry it comes across this way, but it almost seems like you're defending MS here. I've noticed alot of your posts here and I have to say it's a little odd. You clearly acknowledge Microsoft Windows 7 has a battery issue that is NOT being caused by actual old or failing batteries. Yet in the next breath absolve MS of any blame in the matter. People aren't on here to just have a whine, they are fed up in not being able to use an OS without the most crucial part of a notebook (which is mobility) being interfered with. Just like if you drove your car, and had to replace the radiator every 2 months, you'd get fed up too.

    You're not helping the situation by continually harping on how notebook standards are not the same as desktop. That's rubbish. Desktops no more adhere to a 100% standard than any other computer type. And when you realize most computer companies get their chips, chipsets and other components from the same half dozen or so companies, then apples do really equate to apples.

    You're contradicting yourself here by this monotonous and totally useless line that notebooks don't adhere to the same standards as desktops. If that's the case, then why aren't people complaining about their batteries gaining 10x the longevity as the previous OS they were running, or any number of effects? Why is it that this same issue of battery degradation is occurring across multiple kinds of notebook computers, be it intel, amd, nvidia based, using chipsets from dozens of other manufacturers? Can you spoke the common link between them? I can, it's Windows 7.

    Windows 7 is the common element and the fault as to why batteries are failing. By your logic, Vista then should have done this too since you know... notebooks are standardized and all.

    Monday, September 06, 2010 5:05 AM
  • I really wonder why there is no solution to this problem up till this moment. Are we going to fold our hands and watch lots of batteries damaged? Are we going to allow ourselves to be tied  to a mobile machine that have been handicapped by an OS. I am of the opinion that we should start discussing a possible way forward.

     

    The BIG question now is: WHAT IS TO BE DONE?

    Tuesday, September 07, 2010 7:12 AM
  • I have a toshiba, didn't really think anything of it when it would only charge to 86%.  Drained the battery it went up to 92%.  Now im sitting at 1% and thats as far as it will go.

    It's a sad world when Microsoft head quarters for Canada are right around the corner from my house.

     

    EDIT: Solution, gonna go get a MAC

    Thursday, September 09, 2010 5:00 PM
  • I really wonder why there is no solution to this problem up till this moment. Are we going to fold our hands and watch lots of batteries damaged? Are we going to allow ourselves to be tied  to a mobile machine that have been handicapped by an OS. I am of the opinion that we should start discussing a possible way forward.

     

    The BIG question now is: WHAT IS TO BE DONE?

    I want to know this as well. It's clear Microjerks won't do anything about this issue. And I don't think a service pack will do fix it either.

    As for what can be done, well we have the folks disabling the ACPI driver. It works for some, doesn't for others. It seems Win 7 is getting confused as to what the capacity of your battery truly is. Thus it's not charging the battery properly which I believe is causing it to fail due to always running low and not being charged correctly.

    The only solution I can come up with is to locate the betas, and extract the ACPI drivers from it. There's quite a few betas, so the task would take awhile. Other than that, at this point only a class action lawsuit will do anything. It's odd Microsoft has left this go on for so long. That's why I wonder if there isn't some sinister going on, like some anti pirate protection scheme gone horribly wrong.

    Friday, September 10, 2010 1:09 AM
  • I am looking for a Microsoft person to reply to this thread with a status update.

    My battery went was useless after intsalling Windows 7. I bought a brand new battery, it turned to garbage in about 2 weeks. Looks like I'll be installing Ubuntu on my PCs and never using a Microsoft OS again

    Ignorance + Irresponsibility = Microsoft.

    Monday, September 20, 2010 3:35 PM
  • No ***** will reply this thread, we should know by now that we can't get any response.
    Wednesday, September 22, 2010 1:04 PM
  • Have anyone tried using a Windows 7 ISO with ACPI disabled from the beginning? Especially those who get their battery working when reinstalling Vista/XP again.

    RT7 lite can do it, it's not as snappy as Vlite tho, have patience. :) http://www.rt7lite.com/

    See my last post if you wonder why I think this would work any better than disabling ACPI when Windows is already installed.

    Wednesday, September 22, 2010 1:14 PM
  • What the heck is wrong with Microsoft.  FIX THE DAMN PROBLEM.  WTH!
    Saturday, September 25, 2010 1:36 AM
  • Hi,

     

    Exactly the same probleme as everyone for my asus X72JR bought just 7 month ago with a W7 64 bits!!! I feel we will be rockfeller soon if there is no solution we just have to assign microsoft ! The world becomes crazy is it the sign of our decadence, i'm afraid yes. Politics and big company treat us as we are ____...open your eyes men..."they really don't care about us" as said MJ. We need to react if it's not for us, hope we will do it soon for our children...because our freedom is just an illusion...

    Wednesday, September 29, 2010 8:46 PM
  • It's really painful to watch ur new battery go dumb and ur laptop turn handicapped just like a mobile Desktop. For the sake of humanity and divinity, will someone do something. What are the programmers even doing to check into this matter? The pure truth is that we're becoming handicaps.
    Sunday, October 03, 2010 4:42 PM
  • GRRRRRRRRR!

    I upgraded to W7 (32bit) and now my battery is totally dead.

    I would take the hit on a new battery if I knew there was a way to prevent it from being killed.

    What do I (and tons of others) do about???

    Absolutely gutted... 

    Monday, October 04, 2010 1:52 PM
  • GRRRRRRRRR!

    I upgraded to W7 (32bit) and now my battery is totally dead.

    I would take the hit on a new battery if I knew there was a way to prevent it from being killed.

    What do I (and tons of others) do about???

    Absolutely gutted... 

     

    same here... battery drained in 75% in less than a month (new battery bought in 13 August) on HP DV6000 :/

    if i knew earlier that there's a problem with batteries in W7 i wouldn't bought it...

    Wednesday, October 06, 2010 10:40 AM
  • What are Your battery and laptop models guys?

    I have the same problem and my configuration is:

    Toshiba A300-1EG (PSAG4E)

    Battery Li-ion Toshiba 4000mAh PA3534U-1BRS

     

    Did u try to change your battery (to new)? Mabye somone tried to use windows 7 after this? How it works? The same problem or all fine?

    I'll probably change my battery, but i still dont know which windows ill use... (7 or Vista - but i really dont like vista)

    Friday, October 08, 2010 8:04 AM
  • i have HP DV6880ew

    cant remember now battery SN, but have 2 - 8800mAh and 4400mAh

    first one got 25% capacity, second one - 36%

    the biggest one is new (bought 3 weeks ago) so i'm gonna have new one from distributor. but i'm affraid of putting that battery under Win7.

     

    eventually gonna test -

    discharge on w7

    charge on other OS or with turned off computer.

     

    any1 tried this one ?

    Friday, October 08, 2010 10:13 AM
  • Hello Everyone,

    I see this is 10 parts long! WOW

    I have had my DV6000 series laptop for at least 2 years now. It came with Vista (horrible) so I upgraded to Windows 7 32-bit at least a year ago and NO problems (I repeat NO problems) until TODAY!

    This sucks! I am NOT buying a new battery!! I haven't tried to unplug it yet... but i will try and see what happens.

    Any fixes?

    Thanks

    -Jeff

    Monday, October 11, 2010 8:05 PM
  • Y'know, I was kind of hopeful when I saw that Part 10 was started in April...Considering that part 9 lasted from February through March, seeing that this last part was started six months ago gave me some hope that maybe the problem had been resolved, and I had somehow missed a service pack or something...If only...

    So yeah, I'm running an HP Pavilion dv5, just used it some last night without plugging it in, and when I opened it today I found a red X over my battery icon...My battery life on this machine has always been pitiful, but I never thought it to be a problem with the OS, I figured that HP just didn't know how to make a decent battery.  The laptop is still under warranty, so I can probably get HP to replace the battery like they already did with my power supply, but all these people saying their batteries didn't last a week has me a little frightened that I'll never see that new battery's full potential, even though this one has lasted  almost two years for me...

    Monday, October 11, 2010 8:55 PM
  • I have same problem with my Acer Aspire 4736, when it comes with my default window vista my computer running well, my battery can use for more than 2 hours, my dvd rw read and write with no problem. But after my laptop upgraded to window 7 suddenly my dvd rw can not read cd/dvd correctly, it's look like my dvd rw need for replacement. This problem solved after upgraded my dvd rw firmware. Not for a long time, my battery blinking and need replacement, just only a month after upgraded window. I think Window 7 has been destroyed my computer hardware and no solution. It's crazy....
    Wednesday, October 13, 2010 12:55 AM
  • I am facing the same issue. I got a brand new HP laptop which came with vista.  Since vista sucks big time I upgraded to win 7 as it is quick and an amazing OS. It worked amazingly fine in first four months  but i started to see a decrease in my battery timings. I tried contacting HP contact centre but they were of no use. I googled and got to know that win 7 has some ACPI issues. I tried reinstalling the driver sbut they were of now use. So finally i asked for a replacement which HP did give to me after making me  go through some battery. I was eager that nuffing is rong with my battery so I gave my old battery to my friend who was using the same laptop with vista running on it and me that he got 2.5 hours of backup time. This confirmed me that my battery is working fine and that there is nuffing rong with the battery, I asked him to get it fully charged and then i started using it. Since that day i am getting a hours time of backup but that error is still there. 

    I have tried contacting win 7 helpline but they say that there is nufing worng with the battery and that we had did an extensive testing of it. I asked Microsoft to go through this thing again and if there is some issue with the battery then they need to address it as  I and alot of those suffering this issue have no option but to go back to vista or xp. 

    Hope that some one from the microsoft is reading this and is doing smthing abt it.

    Wednesday, October 13, 2010 8:18 PM
  • well... another Notebook with battery problem - my girlfriends netbook (samsun n250 with 8 cells battery) - lost 10% capacity after 2 weeks of using. baterry was charged 2 or 3 times (she really occasionaly use it ;-) )
    Saturday, October 16, 2010 12:54 PM
  • Glad to have found this after Windows 7 killed my replacement battery . . .
    Monday, October 18, 2010 3:51 AM
  • well guys and gals looks like

     

    I found a permanent solution to this problem.....yes you heard it RIGHT...

    PERMANENT SOLUTION

    THAT MEAN I ACTUALLY SOLVED THE PROBLEM.....

     

    And it didn`t came cheap....I have to change 3 batteries in HP laptop (DV5 1102 TX) 1 in acer (5920G) and 1 in my girlfriend's non brand netbook to finally come to the solution .....

     

    well it all started when I installed windows 7,

    HP:

     

    when i installed win 7 in my DV5 it was already 7-8 months+ with the laptop... I used it extensively (even ran crysis!!!!!), so the battery was little bit wear out 4-6% i guess, i didn`t checked it then, it ran vista  3 hours of juice, may be little less after few months of use. after windows 7, the battery just got destroyed ....I MEAN COMPLETELY DEAD within just 3 - 4 weeks...I was LIKE WHAT THE EFFF!!!!

     

    Bought another battery....Died within 4 WEEKS....efffff!!!!!!!!!!

     

    Then started researching ...and found out there are actually no solution...So i tried..every possible solution ..every scenario for over 5 -6 months ...nothing ...I MEAN NOTHING CAME OUT....SO MY LAPTOP IS JUST NOW OVERPRICED DESKTOP!!!!! I saved my 6 months saving for this!!!

    Then I took a risk!

     

    Bought another (3rd) battery!!

    But before installing it, Started researching about ACPI, BIOS, Firmware codding BUG half of the thing i don`t understand what got changed when I install WINDOWS 7! ( I am business major student) ...then I remember I also flashed by BIOS as an regular update from HP. version f.21A to be exact.

    Then it hit me! why a big company like MS ( i hate ms, but respect them) still denying something like this, its because they not only want to protect the laptop companies as well as functionality they added to protect the piracy win 7 piracy through BIOS. ( i read ms wanted to do a OEM product protection through BIOS).

     

    So I DIGGED deep. found there are series of BIOS FLASH UPDATE. right after win 7 arrived and before that. and you know what when I saw the change log.the only thing is COMPUTRACE OOPROM and SOME  efffff  PROTECTION $#!+ ) ..then i checked all the previous bios change log. there are number of  chages like MSD CORE etc etc...sounds important stuffs.

    So I decieded.I will rollback to my previous BIOS..and thats it!

    That solved the ENTIRE PROBLEM!!!..

    the previous version of BIOS of HP F.16... I flahsed it over my OLD original battery (DEAD) , boot it up with that, shut it down. then start with the new battery. VOILA!!!..

    I DIDN!~T FORMAT, I DIDN~T reinstall windows 7, i DIDN`t do ANYTHING but just this.

    USING The windows 7 now for over 15 days (2 weeks) now, with vigouriosly heavy use, using several batterr program (battery care, bar) all of them gave ok signal, almost no wear out (battery bar show 0.01% care shows 0.013% wear out)... i repeat ... i tortured my battery like ____..

     

    thats it my solution is simple .

     Just roll back to previous BIOS (FLASH) with old battery ,reboot, shut down (old battery),wait few minutes (10 -15 min) start with new battery. and see what happens

     

    ACER:

     

    I am a bit skeptic  with my HP success .So I installed win 7 in my dads lappy. and  the battery wear out in HALF within 7 days. ( he was on a tour). So i told him to buy a new battery for longer charge he did. I rolled back to previous bios , did the same thing as HP, voila his 12 cell giving ____ of juice. for about 12 days (no wear out at all). The BIOS version is 1.06 it iwas 1.16 before.

     

    GF, non brand  laptop (MAK)

    this one is tricky , her netbook came with XP. and she never updated her BIOS. (she don`t even know what that means) using it as a desktop for a while as her battery is already dead for a long time, I installed win 7, 3months back (literally, i destroyed her netbook battery and she doesn`t even know ). anyway, I bought her battery and did the reverse. updated her BIOS. (THE COMPANY HAS ONE BIOS FLASH UPDATE (only 1) IN THERE WEBSITE -4 MONTHS BEFORE win 7 came out)....

    and WHAT DO YOU KNOW!!!!???

     

    it worked!!! she is getting 6 hours now....no pun intended!

     

     

    SO GUYS THE SOLUTION IS SIMPLE::::::

    JUST:

    thats it my solution is simple .

     Just roll back to previous BIOS (FLASH) with old battery ,reboot, shut down (old battery),wait few minutes (10 -15 min) start with new battery.  and see what happens

    or you can update the bios..

    and see what happens...

     

    CAUTION::: (MUST READ)


    Don`t get overboard with torturing like ____ with your battery .when it gets back to normal.use it like normally do. and see whats happens.

    I read in some site complete discharge consecutively can also destroy batteries.

    BIOS FLASHING is some serious stuff. YOU MAY SERIOUSLY  HARM YOUR LAPTOP. and may completely BRICK IT.DO THIS AT YOUR OWN RISK.

    IF FLASHING Needs to be done. GO GRADUALY like ...i could've go to f.14a directly from f.21a but i didn`t mostly because. i might just brick my laptop.so i choose f.16 which was right before f.21a.

    after flashing please use the computer for 2 or 3 days (please do this on dead battery). as a caution.play some game or some CPU intesive work to see. how is ur laptop handling the rollback.

    and most importantly try to remember when was the last time you have your laptop battery working well at what version of BIOS. get back to that.

    Unless you are absolutely sure, don`t try the new battery in the laptop then and then.

    the old battery is DEAD. and you can`t do nothing about it. ( i tried Live CD of UBUNTU 8 and charging the OLD battery, nothing happens, it just died).but you can save the new one this way.

     

    THATS ALL.

     

    and GUYS I DIDN`T have the luck to try this on other major  brands laptop like (SONY , ASUS, DELL etc) SO PLEASE PLEASE be careful on what you do. ( look for the BIOS update or rollback on the mode of your laptop [model is important.very important])

     

    I only called it as a permanent solution since  I am seeing smooth sailing on batteries in the three laptop. nothing more to it.

    If any other you have any better solution share it.

    and I am no geek just simply applied some sense to the problem.and so much happy with it

    AND WILL BE MORE HAPPY IF I COULD HELP ALL THE TROUBLED PEOPLE.PLEASE VOTE IT AS HELPFUL SO EVERYONE CAN GET HELP. Thank you.

     

    this is

    razit.

    Bangladesh.

     


     

     

     

     

    • Edited by razit3 Tuesday, October 19, 2010 6:24 AM adding more info
    Tuesday, October 19, 2010 6:16 AM
  • Hi,

     

    Exactly the same probleme as everyone for my asus X72JR bought just 7 month ago with a W7 64 bits!!! I feel we will be rockfeller soon if there is no solution we just have to assign microsoft ! The world becomes crazy is it the sign of our decadence, i'm afraid yes. Politics and big company treat us as we are ____...open your eyes men..."they really don't care about us" as said MJ. We need to react if it's not for us, hope we will do it soon for our children...because our freedom is just an illusion...

    Maybe you're in luck, Asus added this last week! Don't forget to report back to us.

    "BIOS 209
    Add missing code for Battery"

    http://support.asus.de/download/download.aspx?modelname=X72JR&SLanguage=en-us

    Wednesday, October 20, 2010 12:47 AM
  • hello,

    i was having this "consider replacing your battery" problem last week

    i bought this laptop Dec 2009 with windows 7 pre-installed on my Samsung R519 model

    i wrote to samsung to ask them about this and they gave me some tips to get rid of it

    the tips worked but i dont know if it is permanent...

    1) while the power is off, press the on button and hold F2 to access the BIOS

    2) using the arrow keys, highlight BOOT at the top of the page

    3) under BOOT you will find "smart battery calibration"

    4) after finishing the smart battery calibration, recharge the battery to full charge and try to use it

     

    this method worked for me so if anyone has a similar laptop to mine, they can try and see if it will work for them

    good luck! :-)  

    Wednesday, October 20, 2010 2:51 AM
  • Well, that was a lot of reading for no workable solution!

    I have an HP 1216AU TX2 touchscreen laptop, which I've had since Christmas last year, so approx ten months. It came installed with Windows 7, whereas from what I've read most people have upgraded to it. I only noticed the error message today, but I think it's been there maybe two or three days.

    I've always had terribly poor battery performance, but I put it down to the fact it's a touchscreen laptop and that chews up a lot of power. I originally intended to use my laptop a lot for Uni but I have several two hour classes and the battery (I think it's a six cell) doesn't last much longer than an hour, so it's just not sufficient for class if I can't access a power point.

    I charged up my laptop to 96% and pulled out the AC while reading this thread. I pulled it out approximately 20 minutes ago and the battery power is now at 57%. I knew it was bad, but forty percent in twenty minutes?!

    Because my laptop came pre-installed with Windows 7, I'm not sure what steps I should take. I ought to be still within the one year warranty but if it is W7 killing the battery, is it worth trying to go through the hassle of obtaining a new one under warranty? (I've been trying to claim a refund on PASW 18 for a month, which cost $200 and doesn't install on my laptop. SPSS/IBM are giving me the run-around and I'm now out of the 60 day warranty period) I may have a copy of Vista lying around from when I upgraded my previous laptop to that several years ago, so I could downgrade back to Vista, but that may not be the root cause anyway. Would I be able to downgrade and still obtain a new battery if W7 has fried the battery? These are all issues I'm not sure about. It may be worth giving HP a call and seeing if they can find some workable solution.

    The really odd thing is that I had the red X and error message, charged my laptop and pulled the AC. The red X started flashing so I clicked on it, and now it's gone. However, in the five minutes since I last commented on the battery level, it's now dropped another 10%. 

    I'm not really asking for a solution per se, because there clearly isn't one. But I'd really appreciate some advice on whether or not to try getting a new battery under warranty, or simply purchasing a new one, or downgrading to Vista, or trying some sort of BIOS thing (I understand tech stuff, but I usually destroy things when I try and run it, so this would be an absolute last ditch effort that I really don't advise me doing!). I can deal with 50 minutes off the AC for now, because I don't take my laptop out much, but as a long-term solution, I'd love to get rid of the error message because error messages tend to scare me a little >_<

    Thanks for any assistance <3 

    Kami.

    Wednesday, October 20, 2010 11:35 AM
  • Anyone with a solution for HP Pavilion dv6000?

    Is it something to do with BIOS?

    Wednesday, October 20, 2010 1:19 PM
  • Hello,

    I resolved my problem with software to control my battery during just few minutes.

    I installed (For example and in my case) "Battery Doubler" (Free install) and my battery works perfectly, even after uninstall this software.

    Tell me if this solution works for you too.

    (Excuse me for my English)

    My post in French :

    " J'ai eu le même problème avec un nouvel ordinateur neuf de 3 mois. 
    En 2 jours il est passé de 1H30 à 5 min d'autonomie avec le commentaire de la batterie défectueuse. 
    Ayant eu au paravant le même problème sur un ancien portable, toujours sous Seven, je n'ai pas trouvé ça normal. 

    Ma solution : J'ai installé "Battery Doubler" pour prendre la main à la place de Seven pour la gestion de la batterie... 

    Resultat : Dés la premiere utilisation, ma batterie a retrouvé ses 1h30 (même plus en laissant ce logiciel s'occuper de la gestion). 
    Mais même depuis la désinstallation de ce logiciel, Seven gère ma batterie correctement (1h30 d'autonomie) et sans le message de la batterie défectueuse."

    Wednesday, October 20, 2010 5:31 PM
  • The BIOS idea is kind of intriguing to me.  My HP DV4 had Vista 64 preloaded, then I did a clean install of Win 7 in late October 2009.  Prior to installing Win 7 I updated the BIOS with the most recent one provided by HP.  I believe this BIOS update was specifically related to Win 7 upgrades.

    I think I'll buy an oem replacement battery and go back to the original BIOS I had on my notebook similar to the above poster.

    Wednesday, October 20, 2010 9:11 PM
  • The thing is though, if this works, nobody is coming back to tell us so. Do me a favour and come back, let us know how you get on. In fact, PM me. I have a similar situation, Vista pre-loaded DV6, upgraded to Win7.

    Good luck!

    Wednesday, October 20, 2010 9:18 PM
  • If any of you have an old battery that was hit with the "consider replacing your battery" error that you've stopped using, try putting it back into your computer while it's off but plugged in and charge it for a couple hours, then start your computer in safe mode and let it run 100% dry, then charge it fully again.

     

    This fixed one of the batteries that I had this happen to.

     

    The battery had sat around unused for about 1 month before I did this.

     

    It went from a 11% charge capacity to a 96% charge capacity.

     

    My computer is a dv6500.

    Wednesday, October 20, 2010 9:35 PM
  • You sir, just might be on to something! Would this work with my current (and only battery) though?
    Wednesday, October 20, 2010 9:56 PM
  • You sir, just might be on to something! Would this work with my current (and only battery) though?

     

    You could try using ac power only with the battery out of your computer as much as you can for a week+,  if you need to use your battery try not to use it with the ac plugged in so it doesn't charge.

    Thursday, October 21, 2010 6:37 PM
  • You sir, just might be on to something! Would this work with my current (and only battery) though?

     

    You could try using ac power only with the battery out of your computer as much as you can for a week+,  if you need to use your battery try not to use it with the ac plugged in so it doesn't charge.


    I tried it as it is, booted back up and the errors gone! Did an energy report and it's still showing the same capacity wear though. You sure you got a ton more capacity back with yours?

    Thursday, October 21, 2010 7:57 PM
  • You sir, just might be on to something! Would this work with my current (and only battery) though?

     

    You could try using ac power only with the battery out of your computer as much as you can for a week+,  if you need to use your battery try not to use it with the ac plugged in so it doesn't charge.


    I tried it as it is, booted back up and the errors gone! Did an energy report and it's still showing the same capacity wear though. You sure you got a ton more capacity back with yours?


    Yep positive.

     

    Try calibrating your battery.  Charge overnight, then run on AC in the morning till you get a low battery warning, then boot in safe mode and run it 100% dry.  Do that process a few times see if it improves the charge capacity for you.

    Thursday, October 21, 2010 8:04 PM
  • in what windows have you tried this method ? xp , vista or seven ?

    thanks ..

    I tried in xp and the battery is the same . 10 minutes

    Tuesday, October 26, 2010 7:48 AM
  • If any of you have an old battery that was hit with the "consider replacing your battery" error that you've stopped using, try putting it back into your computer while it's off but plugged in and charge it for a couple hours, then start your computer in safe mode and let it run 100% dry, then charge it fully again.

     

    This fixed one of the batteries that I had this happen to.

     

    The battery had sat around unused for about 1 month before I did this.

     

    It went from a 11% charge capacity to a 96% charge capacity.

     

    My computer is a dv6500.

    I followed this and i have 100% now... and after an C:\>powercfg /energy Batterie:Informations sur la batterie ID de batterie 00001 FUJITSU SIEMENS AMILO Xi 1526 Fabricant FUJITSU SIEMENS Numéro de série 00001 Composition chimique LiON Long terme 1 Capacité théorique 4400 Dernier rechargement complet 65232 It's now charged at 1400% !!!! cool but it meens that the information is totaly crasy
    Tuesday, October 26, 2010 8:41 AM

  • Hi all,

    Contacted HP regarding issue for Compaq Presario CQ61 Notebook running Windows 7 Home Premium.  I followed HP instructions which included:

    Updating BIOS

    Callibrating Battery.  (Improved from 20 minutes life to 60 minutes life).

    New battery arrived by courier today.

     

    In my case, HP replaced battery during warranted period.

     

    Rob

    Tuesday, October 26, 2010 11:59 PM
  • Hello,

    I had an issue similar to all with Win 7 OEM "consider replacing your battery" on an HP dx6697us laptop, and after going through the many threads found no solution even after contacting HP.

    However, 4 days ago after trying everything I could possibly think about, the "consider replacing your battery" issue was resolved. After an update from Microsoft, restarted the laptop and all was clear, including the red X mark on top of the battery icon in the taskbar.

    After installing Win 7 SP1 RC today, it's back to the same. The earlier updates with Win 7 were KB2293330 & KB2249857. After reading the details on these, there was nothing related to ACPI, battery issue, or anything else to do with this issue.

    Anyone have a clue about this? HP says to replace the battery as the laptop's out-of-warranty. Heck, why was it OK 4 days ago and battery lasted normal?

    Pinto

    Sunday, October 31, 2010 10:37 PM
  • Hi All,

    I got similar experience with my sony vaio CR36G (3 years old). I upgraded from windows vista to windows 7. With Vista My battery was lasted for atleast 1:45 to 2:15 min depending on usage but after I installed the Win 7, it started degrading. First time it last for 55 mins then It started degrading day by day usage now only 30 mins. I was following several forums (including this) and trying out the stuff but believe me nothing is properly working. Recently, I have installed Freeware BatterCare software but it is still in analyzing cycle procedure. Generally it needs 25 discharge cycle and then it calibrates the battery again and I'm still on 14 discharge cycle.

    I believe removing ACPI drivers doesn't solve the problem even if ACPI drivers are real culprit but without that u will not get status messages for battery so even u disable/uninstall will solve your current status but after you reinstall problem will keep coming. I tried almost all the way i can think or I have read here or at different different forums but problem still exist.

    Below is my battery information:

    Battery ID    656Sony Corp. VGP-BPS9
    Manufacturer    Sony Corp.
    Serial Number    656
    Chemistry    LION
    Long Term    1
    Design Capacity    53280
    Last Full Charge    38310

    With BatteryCare software, I got following information

    Design Capacity    53280

    Total Capicity    38310

    Wear Level: 28%

    Recently, I got very very strange behavior in battery status of win7. It is really misleading... My laptop is in AC plugged in, it is showing me it is charging but it is actually draining the battery percentage over the time which it shouldn't. Then after sometime, it is showing 0% battery and my laptop is still ON on AC power. Now If I remove the the AC plug in, my laptop shutdown which shows that battery is fully discharged. But I start my computer again on AC power, I uninstall the ACPI driver and restart the computer, it showing me 100% battery. It is happening now very frequently. So win 7 is killing me. Even I have battery in good condition and with charge, it is not allowing me to use it. Win 7 is really scrap after reading so many problems with it.Open source OS is atleast good because you haven't paid anything so we can use the same money (which we paid to MS) to buy new battery atleast if fault occurs.

    On time, I tried with Vaio batter driver for vista and above mentioned problem just disappeared but after few days, it is again appearing. There is really bug in ACPI driver that's sure.

    I just have one question for Microsoft. If you are not fully prepared to launch an OS, why did you do that? Your one profit decision and people in world are suffering. I never expected this from MS atleast. But I think, all big companies are same. Till they are small they care everything and after they just looking for Money.....

     

    TO VEGAN FANATIC,

    Paucity of posts not only means that people found the solution but it can also mean that people have lost their faith in solution and given away. :) :)

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Monday, November 01, 2010 8:38 AM
  • "The earlier updates with Win 7 were KB2293330 & KB2249857. After reading the details on these, there was nothing related to ACPI, battery issue, or anything else to do with this issue."

    I'm not sure what you mean, but the title of KB2293330 is:

    "You may incorrectly receive a "Consider replacing your battery" warning message on some older HP notebook computers that are running Windows 7"

    It's only two days old (posted october 30) so it seems like MS have done some progress lately. This is for HP laptops only tho, I wonder if it's possible to install it manually on other brands?

     

    Edit: I forgot the link - http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2293330

    Download - http://catalog.update.microsoft.com/v7/site/Search.aspx?q=KB2293330
    Monday, November 01, 2010 10:29 AM
  • Given the paucity of posts, it looks like people are finally finding a solution to the battery issue.

    Thanks for posting the KB article numbers so those who are wondering can take a peek.

     

    Oh yes, I've found the solution. I'm not using Windows anymore.

    Microsoft is slow, deadly slow, in solving most issues. <Personal Bashing Removed>

    I've been waiting literally years for some bug solving that never happened. You dont have to look back too far, there are bug reports about Windows 7 that are TWO years old... since beta or RC versions. This one is just one of them.

    NOTHING HAS BEEN SOLVED. N-O-T-H-I-N-G.

    So, as Sujal Sheth has already said ... people are not solving their problems : people are just quitting on you.

     

    Monday, November 01, 2010 11:55 AM
  • I second that.

    My 'solution to the battery issue': a new battery and Ubuntu! Goodbye Microsoft and thanks for all the frustration :)

    Monday, November 01, 2010 12:15 PM
  • "The earlier updates with Win 7 were KB2293330 & KB2249857. After reading the details on these, there was nothing related to ACPI, battery issue, or anything else to do with this issue."

    I'm not sure what you mean, but the title of KB2293330 is:

    "You may incorrectly receive a "Consider replacing your battery" warning message on some older HP notebook computers that are running Windows 7"

    It's only two days old (posted october 30) so it seems like MS have done some progress lately. This is for HP laptops only tho, I wonder if it's possible to install it manually on other brands?

     

    Edit: I forgot the link - http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2293330

    Download - http://catalog.update.microsoft.com/v7/site/Search.aspx?q=KB2293330

    Downloaded, run it but it was not compatible with my lapop (hp nc6320)
    Friday, November 05, 2010 4:28 PM
  • Guys (and gals),

    Was just reading over some of the posts in this (extremely long) topic because I recently replaced the battery in my Compaq TC4200 Tablet (bought it used with a bunk dead battery). I began implementing the possible fix mentioned earlier (the "powercfg -setdcvalueindex SCHEME_CURRENT SUB_BATTERY BATACTIONCRIT 0" idea) and noticed something in the Power Options under the Advanced settings. My "Critical battery level -> On battery" was set to 98% (!!!) and "Low battery level -> On battery" was set to 99%! Once I changed those to more respectable values (15% for low and 10% for critical), the red "X" on my battery meter went away. Just a thought, but check those values on your systems, especially if you have replaced the battery recently, and make sure those settings are set to sane levels. Hopefully that will help some of you. I just wish I knew of a way to make Win7 not adjust those values as it sees fit, as it appears to be causing problems in a least some cases. Thanks, and good luck!

     

    -Axemann

    Same strange values over here on a NC6320. Changed them to normal values. And keep fingers crossed....

    Friday, November 05, 2010 4:33 PM
  • So glad I found this forum! I have been having this problem (low battery when upgraded from XP to Win7) for 10 months now. When I purchased my Netbook (Asus EEEPC 1005HA) I got the extra cell battery, and was getting between 7-9 hours per charge on XP.

     

    When I decided to upgrade to Win7, my battery life went to closer to 2 hours. It has been slowly deteriorating since then. most recently less than 30 minutes in a single charge. I generally run it tethered to the wall, which is a pain in the a$$, especially since I purchased it for the capability of using it anywhere, for extended periods of time.

     

    The "consider replacing your battery" message only started showing up about a week ago, and strangely enough, right after I ran and downloaded the latest Windows update... The battery problem was clearly aparrant, but i wasn't concerned until the new message popped up. I just bought a new battery (out of warranty...) and was considering all my options.

     

    I know that this problem is not fixed, and MS seems to have dropped the ball again (Did I mention my 360 red ringed and died AGAIN 3 weeks ago?) but are there any good suggestions that actually work if/when I replace my battery?

     

    I read page 7-10 of these posts because there seemed to be more solution based posting, but still not anything that was 100% - i already removed the "compliant software" in device manager. Bios should be next? Anyone have something different I should be trying for my Netbook?

    Monday, November 08, 2010 6:41 PM
  • bump!

     

    a year on and my battery lasts around 3minutes now. ive got the hp dv9538ea. grrr. hp wont support this laptop with win7 and microsoft are butt heads.

    Friday, November 12, 2010 12:02 AM
  • upgraded to windows 7 about 8 month ago. i recently reinstalled win7 due to a virus and low and behold emediatley got this error that you all got. I have a zd8480 and it worked like a dream pre reinstall. as soon as the reinstall went in the machine emediately came up with this error "consider changing your battery".

    No idea why this should happen when the machine was working perfectly fine before I reinstalled 7 on the machine.

    Sent the machine in for repair as the machine is a laptop and as such it requires a battery that retains its charge to fulfil it's sales description as a portable device.

    please consider this when you are dealing with manufacturers or the vendor under the sales of goods act. let the manufacturers argue the toss with microsoft. I am sure that things will change a little quicker as returns start to come in. and remember your product substancially longer than the 1 year warranty provided with the macine.

    I have an extended warranty and hopefully they will foot the bill for the 3rd battery that this machine has gone through.

    will find out in the next few weeks what will happen when they return it.

    remember that when you buy a laptop that it is a portable device so get extended warranty.

    Friday, November 12, 2010 12:23 AM
  • So:

    Long time, no answer.

    What was the last official word from MS?

    Does anyone here know of any legal standing, where we may have a case?

    I'm thinking we have a bit of a 'community' here. Thats what MS will react to, not a disparate group.

    I feel we need a next step. Which may start some kind of ball rolling. We already have a comprehensive list of makes and models affected.

    I'm not any way legally or organisationally minded, but i am mad keen to make a stand, kick back, do whatever is necassary to get noticed and get some recognition for something that is not our fault.

    Don't ignore us, is the message I want to convey.

    Chris.

    Friday, November 12, 2010 11:23 PM
  • back on page 4 (30th dec 2009) i posted this...

    Battery:Last Full Charge (%)
    The battery stored less than 40% of the Designed Capacity the last time the battery was fully charged.
    Battery ID Hewlett-PackardPrimary
    Design Capacity 88800
    Last Full Charge 11366
    Last Full Charge (%) 12

     

    now i just ran it again after the windows update thing for hp laptops and this was my result.

    Battery:Last Full Charge (%)
    The battery stored less than 40% of the Designed Capacity the last time the battery was fully charged.
    Battery ID Hewlett-PackardPrimary
    Design Capacity 88800
    Last Full Charge 2842
    Last Full Charge (%) 3

    i fail to see how its fixed the error in reporting the 88800 capacity thing. also my battery only stores 3% now!! GRRR!!!

    Saturday, November 13, 2010 11:51 AM
  • bump!

     

    a year on and my battery lasts around 3minutes now. ive got the hp dv9538ea. grrr. hp wont support this laptop with win7 and microsoft are butt heads.

    If HP will not support Windows 7 on you machine, then use the one they do. Do not blame Microsoft for HP's fault.

     


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    its both their faults. hp for not supporting a high end laptop series that is only 2-3 years old. and ms for creating a shitty operating system that cant handle batteries properly and still no fix after 10 pages of complaints.
    Saturday, November 13, 2010 11:56 AM
  • Anyone have a fix for the Gateway NV58 laptop? 
    Saturday, November 13, 2010 4:46 PM
  • Anyone have a fix for the Gateway NV58 laptop?
    Saturday, November 13, 2010 4:47 PM
  • hey guys, i have the same issue and I don't know how I did it but I got my battery to work after so many months of the red X on my power icon. just go to the following link and it will fix the issue. Oh by the way the issue was that windows 7 was not recognizing any batteries. This little app is the first one that told me what kind of model the battery was as oppose to the other's links in these threads telling me the same thing every time: UNKNOWN MODEL!!!      the link is: batterycare.net
    Tuesday, November 23, 2010 3:55 AM
  • Hi I recently put windows 7 on my acer 8930g and girl freinds aspire 5630. Her laptop did the infamous replace battery thing and went from nearly two hours runtime down to 15 minutes over a few months. Mine went from just over two hours to around 1 hour 15 in around 6 to 9 months. As much as I hated vista I did feel I could trust the battery indicator more than windows 7.

    Battery bar said the 5630 had 95 percent wear so I decided to try the calibration method on the 5630 turning the reserve capacity and critical level action to the lowest settings. I think 1 percent is the lowest on the critical part. Then just unplugged it and let it run. Well over an hour later it was still going and would normally have shut down after ten minutes. It got stuck around 7 percent and then went pop/black out. It would not turn on so had definately used all the battery. Turned it back on to find the battery warning had gone and it now indicates 1.45 hours run time. This laptop and battery is 4 years old and is now back to great working order. Also the wear is at 0% again.

    As for my 2 year old 8930g, after one cycle it increased the wear from 26 percent to 37. Then I set the critical perameters down again and did another full charge/discharge cycle. It got stuck at 8 percent again like there was magically more capacity somewhere. Then it shut down as it should at 1 percent but mine would turn back on. A further ten minutes at 1 percent and it went pop/blackout. Turned it back on and have now got 33 percent wear. Her laptop draws around 20.000mw and mine up to 40.000mw. So as much as I was getting ready to sign the form to sue MS in my case it seems that her laptop could have been easily remedied if this information was made available to the general public rather than having to try and google what other people have done. As for the 8930g it has speakers in every panel, silly lights a huge screen and 33% percent battery wear over 2 years is probably reasonable for such a porky laptop. The acer 8930g has a design flaw in the power jack meaning it snaps the negative lead all the time with opening the lid. I have re-routed the negative to earth via the hinge to bypass having to have a flex wire. Its been running like this for a few weeks and was not aware of the battery wear level prior to this mod. Theres always the possibility some wear is due to my mod but I noticed no change in run time and thought id mention it.

    You really should try this if you havnt already. I uninstalled the acpi thingy and tried all the settings but recalibration worked for me. This guy went one step further and removed the critical action mode with a command prompt but im not sure theres much point as you can just turn it back on after a critical shutdown to kill it. Dan

    http://www.cnet.com/8705-4_1-0.html?username=snlu178&tag=contentMain;contentBody#9022545

    Tuesday, November 23, 2010 11:25 PM
  • Garbage!  My toshiba just started doing this.  Think nothing of it, as its a year old.  Premature...but OK.  I buy a new battery, a bigger battery for better capacity, and the thing doesn't charge it at all.  It lasts about 10mins, flickers, and shuts off. 

     

    WTF MS...Really??  Toshiba tells me they haven't heard of this.

    Wednesday, November 24, 2010 4:51 AM
  • I have been watching this item for a few weeks hoping to find a resolution - but alas none.

    I have upgraded 3 laptops with the official release of Win7 with the following results:

    Acer Aspire 5315 (2 years old) from Vista Basic to Win7 Prof (32bit) CLEAN INSTALL - no problem with the battery

    Dell Inspiron 1750 (3 months old) from Vista Prem to Win7 Prem (64bit) UPGRADE - no problem with battery

    Dell Vostro 1510 (18 months old) from Vista Basic to Win7 Prem (64bit) CLEAN INSTALL - battery destroyed

     

    Like a previous member, I am wondering whether it is the 64bit version only - in which case it proves to be a Microsoft problem.  My Vostro was lasting ~ 2.5 hours under Vista Basic, but within a few weeks of the upgrade battery life is reduced to minutes.  The powercfg output reads:

    Battery:Battery Information
    Battery ID 11Dell
    Manufacturer Dell
    Serial Number 11
    Chemistry Lion
    Long Term 1
    Design Capacity 57720
    Last Full Charge 12400
    I have no intention of buying a new battery until this issue is resolved, so until then I have another desktop!!

    After formatting my HP with the disc that was made from the hard drive, my battery died in 30 minutes. After updating the Bios, removing the battery for 30 seconds, popping it back in, running it down completely and recharging it completely, it now works good as new.
    Friday, December 03, 2010 11:26 PM
  • I find it strange that everyone upgrading to Windows 7 is experiencing the same problem, regardless of brands of computers. I have 3 HP CQ60's in our house. Each has been restored to factory new condition at least one, without any battery problems. One machine however, was formatted with the disc's that were made from the machine. THAT computer started having the exact same problem as mention on this forum. HP suggested I update my BIOS, pop out the battery and put it back in, completely discharge the battery, and the completely recharge it with the machine turned off before using it. IT WORKED! Now. Am I missing something here? Is there something else going on with my compter that I can't see. Or was this a customized fix that HP made strictly for me???
    Saturday, December 04, 2010 1:01 PM
  • But will they do it for me????   HP chat help walked me in circles.  If you have a minute please write back on what BIOS update you referred tto.  Can't find that specific one.  ( just bought an HP G62 laptop W7 )  I get maybe 1 1/2 hrs on a good day.  Perhaps I should be content.  Oh, the laptop just shuts down with no warning at 35%.  I have added every goofy warning sound on the list so you would think I would notice it by now.  Thans for your post.  M9 

    Sunday, December 05, 2010 8:14 PM
  • I went into the HP Support Assistant, found my current Bios, wrote it down, then connected with HP, they scanned my computer, found my newest Bios, d/l'ed it, installed it, then just ran down the battery, poped it out then back in, and recharged.tp connect with HP, go to the HP page on the net. Follow the instructions on connecting. It's simple.
    Thursday, December 09, 2010 12:48 AM
  • Well seen the fact that this problem is still not solved after years, i think we are scammed by microsoft again.

    Vista was an disaster with its drivers, and now 7 is an disaster with distroing our battery's.

    Be sure in windows 8 the CPU driver will fail working.

    I liked windows 7 but it distroys my laptop so the only posibility left is to delete windows 7....as i did with Vista.

    I thought microsoft was an american company, but it sells like chinees ____ time after time.

    Monday, December 13, 2010 6:53 AM
  •  Notice: THIS THREAD HAS BEEN LOCKED!

    The last thread in the conversation is Part 11.

    If you have not already done so, please review the troubleshoot battery problems article and the consider replacing your battery article. For tips to conserve battery power please review the Conserving battery power article.


    IT Pro Audience Manager for Web Forums
    Wednesday, December 15, 2010 3:07 AM