none
Moving "Users" folder location to another drive/partition

    Question

  •  

    I wish to change the location of the entire "Users" folder, similar to the way that "My Documents" could be moved in earlier Windows versions.  I am looking for a way to do accomplish this.

     

    I could find no applicable article in the Knowledge Base -- frankly, I can never find anything there.  Here, it is as if Microsoft is no longer publishing Knowledge Base articles for Vista.

     

    I could only find one on-point how-to, an instruction set by Joshua Mouch, "Change User Profile Folder Location in Vista": http://joshmouch.wordpress.com/2007/04/07/change-user-profile-folder-location-in-vista/

     

    1.  I am posting this link here to ask, is this article is functionally correct?

     

    2.  For those expert in Vista, is there a reason not to do this?

     

    3.  Is there a better way to accomplish the entire move of the "Users" folder?

     

    4.  Could Mr. Mouch's method, or a similar method, be written as a specific, step-by-step, how-to Knowledge Base article?

     

    5.  Is there a "Wizard" which can accomplish this?

     

    6.  Does Microsoft have plans to support/provide for such a capabality in future builds or service packs?

    Sunday, July 08, 2007 12:18 PM

All replies

  • How to move the special folders in Windows Vista

    ·                                 Ramesh Srinivasan      http://www.winhelponline.com/articles/180/1/

    ·                                 Published Nov 28, 2006

     

    Introduction                                                                     

    This article describes how to move the special folders in Windows® Vista.

     

    Moving the special folders

    Windows Vista lets you easily relocate the shell folder paths for Documents, Music and Pictures folder using the Property sheet. Note that in Windows XP, selectively moving the My Pictures or the My Music folders required a registry edit. This is no longer the case in Vista.

    Method 1   USELESS

    To move a special folder to a different drive or path, follow these steps:

    ·                                 Create the destination folder first

    ·                                 Click the Start button

    ·                                 Right-click the special folder (Documents, Music, or Pictures) and choose Properties

    ·                                 Select the Location tab

    ·                                 Click Move and select the target folder

    ·                                 Click Apply

    ·                                 Click Yes when you're prompted to move the files to new location

    ·                                 Click OK

    The shell folder is now moved to the new location.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Method 2: Using Registry Editor

    To accomplish this using Registry editor, follow these steps:

    ·                                 Create the destination folder first

    ·                                 Click Start, Run and type Regedit.exe

    ·                                 For per-user special folders, navigate to the following location:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER \ Software \ Microsoft \ Windows \ CurrentVersion \ Explorer \ User Shell Folders

    ·                                 For per-system special folders, navigate to the following location:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \ Software \ Microsoft \ Windows \ CurrentVersion \ Explorer \ User Shell Folders

    ·                                 Double-click the corresponding shell folder name

    ·                                 Change the Value data accordingly, mentioning the destination path

    ·                                 Close Regedit.exe

    Default shell folder paths - Listing

    Per-user special folders

    Value name (Special folder)

    Value data

    {374DE290-123F-4565-9164-39C4925E467B}

    %USERPROFILE%\Downloads

    AppData

    %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Roaming

    Cache

    %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files

    Cookies

    %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Cookies

    Desktop

    %USERPROFILE%\Desktop

    Favorites

    %USERPROFILE%\Favorites

    History

    %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\History

    Local AppData

    %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Local

    My Music

    %USERPROFILE%\Music

    My Pictures

    %USERPROFILE%\Pictures

    My Video

    %USERPROFILE%\Videos

    Nethood

    %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Network Shortcuts

    Personal

    %USERPROFILE%\Documents

    PrintHood

    %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Printer Shortcuts

    Programs

    %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs

    Recent

    %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Recent

    SendTo

    %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\SendTo

    Start Menu

    %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu

    Startup

    %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\Startup

    Templates

    %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Templates

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Per-system special folders

    Value name (Special folder)

    Value data

    {3D644C9B-1FB8-4f30-9B45-F670235F79C0}

    %PUBLIC%\Downloads

    Common AppData

    %ProgramData%

    Common Desktop

    %PUBLIC%\Desktop

    Common Documents

    %PUBLIC%\Documents

    Common Programs

    %ProgramData%\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs

    Common Start Menu

    %ProgramData%\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu

    Common Startup

    %ProgramData%\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\Startup

    Common Templates

    %ProgramData%\Microsoft\Windows\Templates

    CommonMusic

    %PUBLIC%\Music

    CommonPictures

    %PUBLIC%\Pictures

    CommonVideo

    %PUBLIC%\Videos

     

     

    To reset the shell folder paths for Music/Documents/Pictures/Videos folders in Windows Vista, you may use the REG file reset_music_pictures_docs_path.reg. Download and save the file to the Desktop. Right-click on the file and choose Merge.

     

    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
     
    ;Resets the shell folder paths for Music, Pictures, Videos and Documents
    ;For Windows Vista systems only
    ;Created on March 30, 2007
    ;Ramesh Srinivasan - http://www.winhelponline.com
     
    [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\User Shell Folders]
    "My Music"=hex(2):25,00,55,00,53,00,45,00,52,00,50,00,52,00,4f,00,46,00,49,00,\
      4c,00,45,00,25,00,5c,00,4d,00,75,00,73,00,69,00,63,00,00,00
    "My Pictures"=hex(2):25,00,55,00,53,00,45,00,52,00,50,00,52,00,4f,00,46,00,49,\
      00,4c,00,45,00,25,00,5c,00,50,00,69,00,63,00,74,00,75,00,72,00,65,00,73,00,\
      00,00
    "My Video"=hex(2):25,00,55,00,53,00,45,00,52,00,50,00,52,00,4f,00,46,00,49,00,\
      4c,00,45,00,25,00,5c,00,56,00,69,00,64,00,65,00,6f,00,73,00,00,00
    "Personal"=hex(2):25,00,55,00,53,00,45,00,52,00,50,00,52,00,4f,00,46,00,49,00,\
      4c,00,45,00,25,00,5c,00,44,00,6f,00,63,00,75,00,6d,00,65,00,6e,00,74,00,73,\
      00,00,00

     

     

     

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

     

     

    How can I move the "users" folder???

    Is there an easy way to move the user folder off the system drive? I understand the concept of virtual folders, but when i drag and drop a file from my desktop to my "Matthew" folder i have displayed on the desktop, it goes to c:\Users\Matthew I want my Users folder on my E:\ drive (e:\users\matthew) Even better would be if i could have "c:\users" just be "e:\"

     

     

    Re: How can I move the "users" folder??? Need it off the C: drive!!!!

    If you want to re-direct all your user data folders in one shot, you essentially have two options:

    1. You can use unattend.xml (i believe there is a blog post on this) during setup to define exactly where you want your Profile 'Users' directory to be created. All new profiles will be created at that location.

     2. You can also individually redirect all your profile folders using the following method if you already have the OS installed. However one thing to point out is that once you have the OS installed, you cannot move the root profile folder, i.e. Users directory or the username folder itself.

    1. Go to the Start>Username folder.

    2.  Select all the folders in the explorer window you want to move/re-direct.

    3. Cut-paste them to the new location of your choosing.  

     This will also redirect all the folders to the new location and update the registry entries for them as well in a manner similar to the manual redirection via the locations tab as suggested above.

     

     

    Actually, there IS a way to move existing profiles and the profiles root directory, although I'm sure it's unsupported, use at your own risk, etc.

    The key HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList includes a value for the ProfilesDirectory that points to the root profile directory (i.e. %SystemDrive%\Users), and each subkey represents the location of a single profile, identified by account SID. User profiles don't all have to be under the root profile directory, but the Default and All Users profiles do. Newly copied profiles (either from default or roaming) go into the root profile directory.

    Don't try to move a profile that's in use. Changes to the profile root directory only take effect properly after reboot.

    Even if you move the profile, there MIGHT be paths that lead to the old directory (although this isn't supposed to be happening to support roaming profiles correctly; romaing profiles may be located anywhere when cached on the client machines).

     

    Wow. That registry trick works awesome. Thats exactly what i needed. Now my e:\ drive has Users, Documents, Images, Videos, Music, and Downloads folders, with the virtual folders under 'e:\Users\Matthew' and 'e:\Users\Ashley' linking back out to thier respective folder in the root directory (e:\)

    All this so when my 'Matthew' folder is displayed on the desktop, i can drag and drop files to it and they physically reside at e:\Users\Matthew. From there further sorting into the Virtual folders is easy.

     

    We provide an unattend setting (Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup | FolderLocations | ProfilesDirectory) for doing exactly this! I would recommend applying this setting during a clean install. But beware - if you move the Users folder to a location other than the system volume, upgrades will be blocked!!!

     

    A description of known issues with the FolderLocation settings in the Windows Vista Unattend.xml file            http://support.microsoft.com/kb/929831

    INTRODUCTION

    You can use the FolderLocations settings in the "Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup" area of the Windows Vista Unattend.xml file to move the user profiles folder or the program data folder to a non-default target location. The user profiles folder is typically %systemdrive%\Users. The program data folder is typically %systemdrive%\ProgramData.

    This article describes known issues with the FolderLocations settings in the Unattend.xml file.

    MORE INFORMATION

    The target location for the user profiles and program data folders can be on a volume other than the system drive as long as the volume meets the following requirements:

     

    It must be an NTFS file system volume.

     

    It must not be the path of another operating system user profile folder or program data folder.

     

    It must not contain any serviceable components.

    These unattend settings have the following known issues:

     

    If you use the FolderLocations unattend settings to move user data or program data to a location other than the %systemdrive% folder, you block upgrades to other versions of Windows Vista or to later releases of Microsoft Windows.

     

    If you use the System Preparation Tool (Sysprep) to apply the FolderLocations unattend settings, some system directory junctions do not point to the new target location. The following system directory junctions continue to point to the old locations:

     

    C:\Documents and Settings continues to point to C:\Users.

     

    C:\ProgramData\Desktop continues to point to C:\Users\Public\Desktop.

     

    C:\ProgramData\Documents continues to point to C:\Users\Public\Documents.

     

    C:\ProgramData\Favorites continues to point to C:\Users\Public\Favorites.

     

     

    If you use the Windows Vista Setup program to apply the FolderLocations unattend settings, the system directory junctions do not point to the new target location. The following system directory junctions continue to point to the old locations:

     

    C:\Documents and Settings continues to point to C:\Users.

     

    C:\Users\Default User continues to point to C:\Users\Default.

     

    C:\Users\All Users continues to point to C:\ProgramData.

     

     

    If you use the System Preparation Tool to apply the ProfilesDirectory unattend settings, the user profiles of domain users who have previously logged on to the computer are left in the old location. The public profile is also left in the old location.

     

     

    The EdBott.com blog advice doesn't really re-locate the user folder. It only relocates some of the user subfolders (Documents, Music, etc.) It doesn't work for the hidden user subfolders (like AppData) at all. And it doesn't move the root folder for the user, so if you click on the username on the Start menu, you're still taken to the C:\users\username folder.

    The same goes for cutting and pasting user subfolders, I believe, as was mentioned in an eariler post.

    So far, it looks like the registry change is the way to go. BTW, here is the microsoft KB article that documents that registry hack:

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/236621

     

     XP RESOLUTION        http://support.microsoft.com/kb/236621

    To specify a different folder for the "Documents and Settings" folder during installation, follow these steps:

    1.

    Use the /UNATTEND switch with Winnt.exe or Winnt32.exe and insert the following entry into the Unattend.txt file, where z:\foldername is the path and folder name you want:

    [GuiUNattended]
    ProfilesDir = z:\foldername

    2.

    Install Windows. The path you included in the Unattend.txt file is used instead of the default "Documents and Settings" folder.

     

    To specify a different folder for the "Documents and Settings" folder after you install Windows for a particular user, follow these steps:

    1.      Identify the user's profile path. There are two methods to identify the profile path. Either by user path settings or user SID. The user SID method is preferred.

     

    User SID method

    a.      Use the GETSID tool from the Windows Server Resource Kit to obtain the SID. Use syntax similar to the following example:

    GETSID \\SERVER1 UserName \\SERVER1 UserName

    b.      Once you obtain the SID, use Regedit.exe or Regedt32.exe to select the user's SID under the following registry key:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList

     

    User path setting

    a.      Log on to the computer as the user, and then type SET at a command prompt. Note the setting for USERPROFILE, and then close the command prompt window.

    b.      Log on as an administrator of the computer.

    c.

    Use Registry Editor to add the USERPROFILE setting to the following registry key:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList

    d.      Click the registry key, and then click Find on the Edit menu.

    e.      In the Find box, type the value of the USERPROFILE setting, and then click Find Next.

     

    2.      Change the ProfileImagePath value to use the new path you want in the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList registry key.

    3.      Close Registry Editor, and then log on as the user. Type SET at the command prompt to verify the path has changed.

    Entire Folder

    NOTE: This method relocates key Windows components. Use this method only if you require the "Documents and Settings" folder to be moved or renamed and you cannot use the Unattend.txt file to change the name during installation.

     

    To specify a different folder for the entire "Documents and Settings" folder, including key system components, follow these steps:

    1.

    Log on to the computer as an administrator.

    2.

    Create a new folder.

    3.

    Open the current "Documents and Settings" folder.

    4.

    On the Tools menu, click Folder Options, and then click the View tab.

    5.

    Under Advanced settings click Show hidden files and folders, and then click to clear the Hide file extensions for known file types and Hide protected operating system files check boxes.

    6.

    Click OK.

    7.

    Click and drag to copy all the folders to the new folder, except for the currently logged on users folder.

    8.

    In Control Panel, double-click System, and then click the User Profiles tab.

    9.

    Copy the current user's profile to the new folder.

    10.

    Click OK, close Control Panel, and then log off and log on to the computer as an administrator again.

    11.

    In Registry Editor, click Find on the Edit menu.

    12.

    Type documents and settings, and then click Find.

    13.

    Replace the value data or rename the value or registry key to the new path for each and every registry key and value that contains the original path.NOTE: You must complete this change for every instance in the registry or your computer may not start. It is imperative that you update all registry keys and values with the new path.

    14.

    Restart the computer.

    15.

    You can now safely remove the original "Documents and Settings" folder.

    Note If you search the registry for "Documents and Settings," you will find a string value in the following subkey: HKLM\system\controlset001\control\hivelist. This string value is \Device\HarddiskVolume#\Documents and Settings. Do not change this string value. After you finish searching for "Documents and Settings," also search for the short file name "Docume~1." Change the path for those results.

    Back to the top

     

     

     

     

     

    http://channel9.msdn.com/ShowPost.aspx?PostID=192697

     

    Posted April 7, 2007 Comments(36)

    Here lies my experience moving my entire User Profile folder structure, including Default, Public, and any local users.

    In my search for a solution, the only two easy ways I found to move the user profile directory locations from the system drive is to

    1. Set the User Profile folder during setup using an unattended install file.
    2. Move the individual folders inside your user profile, which can be done using explorer (which will update the registry keys HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Shell Folders and HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\User Shell Folders).

    However, this was not good enough for me, I wanted my actual user profile folder to be moved to a seperate partition/volume, including registry settings.  I discovered that it is not actually that hard, provided you’re comfortable with mass replacing registry keys and values.

    Here is how I moved my user profile location.  Please note that I wanted all of the profiles moved, included Public and Default, so some of these steps can be skipped if you do not want that:

    1. Make sure you have a complete backup of your system!
    2. Copy the original Default Profile directory to the new location (e.g. from C:\Users\Default to D:\Users\Default).
    3. Copy the original Public Profile directory to the new location (e.g. from C:\Users\Public to D:\Users\Public).
    4. Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList.
    5. Change the value of the Default key to the new user profile location (e.g. D:\Users\Default).
    6. Change the value of the Public key to the new user profile location (e.g. D:\Users\Public).
    7. Change the value of the ProfilesDirectory to the new user profile location (e.g. D:\Users).
    8. At this point, you need to restart and log back in as a different user that has never logged in before and therefore does not have a profile created.  In my case, the Administrator user had never logged in before so I enabled it so that Administrator could log in and used that.  You can enable Administrator login by loading Computer Management and then go to User Accounts, edit the properties for Administrator, and then uncheck Disable Login.
    9. After logging in for the first time with the new user account, you will see “Creating Desktop” and other things like that while Windows is creating your profile.  Note that the new profile should be created in the new location.
    10. After logging in, try to close as many applications as possible.  This will prevent most files from being locked so that you cannot copy them.
    11. Copy the entire original user profiles folder from the original location to the new location (e.g. C:\Users\* to D:\Users\).  (See next step after copy starts).
    12. There are a few things to note during this copy.  There were thousands of .TMP files that were locked and would not copy.  I just skipped these files.  I held down Alt-S so that I could see all of the skipped files and make sure that there were only .TMP files being skipped.  Yes, this took a little while, but at least I was confident that I got all of my files copied.  This process could probably be made easier using the command prompt or powershell.
    13. If, in your case, there are some files that will not copy, you can run procexp.exe, which is file provided by sysinternals.  Then do a Find Handle and search for part of the filename.  procexp will tell you which programs are locking the file.  As long as you closed as many programs as you could, though, this should not happen.
    14. Find and download a program that will do a Search & Replace on the registry.  I will not suggest one because I did not find one single program that worked perfectly.  I ended up downloading a few different freeware applications and using all of them.
    15. Using the Registry Search & Replace program, do a search for the original user profile folder and replace it with the new user profile folder (e.g. search for “C:\Users” and replace with “D:\Users”.  Note that some of the applications I used would only change values and not key names.  However, the keys that needed to be changed were all related to MuiCache.  I do not know if these actually need to be updated.  I did just to make sure.
    16. Log out.  Log back in with the same user.  Repeat step 14 until there is nothing left to replace.  The reason for this step is that on logout, some programs seem to update the registry using the old user profile path.
    17. Run regedit.exe and do a search for the original user profile path and make sure it does not exist.  The reason for this step is because (as noted in step 13), I did not trust any of the Registry Search & Replace programs I used.  I ended up needing to update about a dozen of the keys and values manually, since the search & replace missed them.
    18. So that you can easily find programs that do not use the registry and hard-coded profile paths, rename your original profile folder (e.g. rename C:\Users to C:\~Users).
    19. Log out. Log back in as your usual user.  Everything should be working correctly except for programs that use a “hardcoded” user profile location.
    20. There are two easy methods that can be used to find programs that use a “hardcoded” profile location and are still looking for the original user profile path.  You can use the procexp.exe trick mentioned above and search for handles in the original profile location.  You can also monitor the oringal profile location to see if any new folders or files were created.  For example, in my case, FolderShare created some folders and files in the directory C:\Users\MyUsername\AppData\Local\FolderShare\.  So, I updated the FolderShare settings to point to the different path and then deleted the C:\Users directory (note that C:\~Users still existed as a backup).
    21. Since you are now confident that all of your data has been moved (right??????), you can deleted the backup of the original user profile location (e.g. C:\~Users).

     

    This procedure worked flawlessly for me.  Everything user-related is now on a completely different volume, and I can sleep a little better at night!

    http://joshmouch.wordpress.com/

     

    Please reply to my email. I have several ideas on improving your process.
    For step 14:  Use Resplendence Registry Manager v5.50
    Email me for a copy.

    Jay

    MRGCAV@gmail.com

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    • Proposed as answer by ashrack Friday, November 20, 2009 8:21 AM
    Wednesday, July 18, 2007 8:13 PM
  • sorry about the lengthy explanation...

     

    in windows XP by default we are given

     

    C:\Documents and Settings\”User Name”.”Full Computer Name”\My Documents

     

    this My Documents folder has a special property of being able to “move” or relocate to another place. however, in windows vista they removed the folder My Documents.

     

    now in windows vista we have:

     

    C:\Users\”User Name”\Documents

     

    the main problem in vista is that the “Users” folder and the “User Name” folder cannot be moved or relocated

     

    however, all of the “pre-customized” folders inside of the “User Name” folder CAN be relocated in vista

     

    so i tried to individually relocate the “Documents” folder for example to another location like D:\

     

    in other words i created a folder called D:\Documents

     

    then i moved the target location of C:\Users\User Name\Documents

     

    to D:\Documents

     

    now the Documents folder is easy to access!!

     

    however, there are two problems with that solution:

     

    PROBLEM#1: when i go to file open now there are 2 folders called “Documents” which is udderly ridiculous.

     

    PROBLEM#2: let’s say i wanted to create another folder called D:\Resumes and let’s say i wanted that folder to show up when i click on the User Name folder. well i can create a new folder with no problem but it’s not going to show up when i click on the User Name folder.

     

    in XP however if i have My Documents targeted on D:\ then any folder i create on D:\ will show up in My Documents…great during open/save operations!

     

    i see how the registry solutions could work but i really dont agree with individually editing registry keys to solve this problem. i think using a utility such as "mklink" is a nifty idea…but it does not solve problem number 2 on my list above.

     

    if we were able to figure out how microsoft creates folders with the move target property then we could probably figure out how to force the “User Name” folder to have that property as well.

     

    is anyone familiar with how to create folders which have that property?

     

    P.S.  i'm not worried about moving any UPDATE folders....just want my own data folders on a seperate partition.

     

    thanks for starting this off on here, don.

    • Proposed as answer by mmma Sunday, August 17, 2014 3:12 PM
    Monday, July 30, 2007 11:40 PM
  • I found the solution for the Vista update problem when hacking the registry. Look at: http://rogerhendriks.blogspot.com/2007/09/moving-vista-users-directory.html

    Saturday, September 01, 2007 8:56 AM
  • Many people have enjoyed for years that in Unix you can put the users data on separate disks with symbolic links. Now Windows has joined the club with the Vista version having the ability to create true symbolic links. Here’s how to configure a symbolic link to your “C:\Users” directory on a different hard disk. We will assume the “D” partition as the destination drive for this example below.

    1. Copy all files from “C:\Users” to “D:\Users”
    2. Rename the original “C:\Users” directory to “C:\OldUsers”
    3. Make a symbolic link from “C:\Users” to “D:\Users”
    4. After making sure it works correctly, you can remove the “C:\OldUsers”

    The nice thing about this way of doing it is the OS does not know any difference that the “Users” dir is not on the same drive.

     

    http://rogerhendriks.blogspot.com/2007/09/moving-vista-users-directory.html

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NTFS_symbolic_link

    Thursday, March 20, 2008 10:33 PM
  • Rename the original “C:\Users” directory to “C:\OldUsers

    Would someone please explain how that is accomplished. I'm trying to rename the C:/Users folder right now and Vista won't let me.
    Tuesday, May 06, 2008 12:25 AM
  • If Windows won't let you rename the directory, then you have not correctly changed the registry settings.

    In other words, Windows is still accessing that directory and will not allow you to mess with it.

    Make sure you edit the Registry with Administrator permissions.
    Thursday, June 12, 2008 3:27 AM
  • Well, that exactly what Win Vista did to me when I moved the “contacts” folder from within user ID from C:\valtg\contacts\ to the D:\contacts. The OS has made a link to the entire D:\ drive under user valtg. So every time I start my machine the D: is listed under C:\valtg which was necessary for those old days (a la UNIX) but today this is too late and un-necessary (space is not problem any more), so I am not interested. Do you know ho to remove this annoying link?

    Thursday, August 14, 2008 6:35 PM
  • Hi,

    I know it is a bit late, but someone might be still interested in this:
    Relocation of the Users directory and the ProgramData directory to a disk drive other than the disk drive that contains the Windows directory on a Windows Vista-based or a Windows Server 2008-based computer
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/949977

    Hope that helps.

    Peter

    • Proposed as answer by KC-Jenner Wednesday, August 25, 2010 10:38 PM
    Friday, November 06, 2009 12:21 PM

  • Actually, there IS a way to move existing profiles and the profiles root directory, although I'm sure it's unsupported, use at your own risk, etc.

    The key HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList includes a value for the ProfilesDirectory that points to the root profile directory (i.e. %SystemDrive%\Users), and each subkey represents the location of a single profile, identified by account SID. User profiles don't all have to be under the root profile directory, but the Default and All Users profiles do. Newly copied profiles (either from default or roaming) go into the root profile directory.

    Don't try to move a profile that's in use. Changes to the profile root directory only take effect properly after reboot.

    Even if you move the profile, there MIGHT be paths that lead to the old directory (although this isn't supposed to be happening to support roaming profiles correctly; romaing profiles may be located anywhere when cached on the client machines).

     


    That is exactly what I have been looking for for the past hour now. Thx man
    Friday, November 20, 2009 8:21 AM