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How to turn off Timeout Detection and Recovery of GPUs?

    Question

  • Hi all,

    Does anyone know how to adjust settings for the Timeout Detection and Recovery of GPUs in 7? I found an article on Technet detailing how to turn TDR off in Vista( Link ), but the registry keys it mentions don't seem to exist in 7.

    ATI's VPU Recover always caused havok under XP, and it seems that TDR is doing the same thing on 7. So if anyone can help me shut it off or tone it down, I'd love to get back to Fallout 3. :)
    Sunday, January 18, 2009 9:01 PM

Answers

  • Mr. Perfect said:

    Hi all,

    Does anyone know how to adjust settings for the Timeout Detection and Recovery of GPUs in 7? I found an article on Technet detailing how to turn TDR off in Vista( Link ), but the registry keys it mentions don't seem to exist in 7.

    ATI's VPU Recover always caused havok under XP, and it seems that TDR is doing the same thing on 7. So if anyone can help me shut it off or tone it down, I'd love to get back to Fallout 3. :)


    As far as I know, if the keys exist, it still should obey them. They might not be there by default but I would try creating them manually and seeing if that does the trick for you.

    http://blog.tiensivu.com/aaron/ - https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Aaron.Tiensivu - If you find my post helpful, please click on the "Post was helpful" option inside my post.
    Monday, January 19, 2009 5:00 AM
    Answerer
  • I found a thread in AMD/ATI's forums that should give you all the details you need to set this up. The OS discussed is Vista, but it should work of W7 as well.

    http://forums.amd.com/devforum/messageview.cfm?FTVAR_FORUMVIEWTMP=Linear&catid=328&threadid=100142
    Tuesday, January 20, 2009 5:06 PM

All replies

  • Mr. Perfect said:

    Hi all,

    Does anyone know how to adjust settings for the Timeout Detection and Recovery of GPUs in 7? I found an article on Technet detailing how to turn TDR off in Vista( Link ), but the registry keys it mentions don't seem to exist in 7.

    ATI's VPU Recover always caused havok under XP, and it seems that TDR is doing the same thing on 7. So if anyone can help me shut it off or tone it down, I'd love to get back to Fallout 3. :)


    As far as I know, if the keys exist, it still should obey them. They might not be there by default but I would try creating them manually and seeing if that does the trick for you.

    http://blog.tiensivu.com/aaron/ - https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Aaron.Tiensivu - If you find my post helpful, please click on the "Post was helpful" option inside my post.
    Monday, January 19, 2009 5:00 AM
    Answerer
  • That idea might work. Thanks, I'll give it a shot.

    Now if only I had a repeatable way of getting TDR to go off, I could really see if it works...
    Tuesday, January 20, 2009 4:35 AM
  • I found a thread in AMD/ATI's forums that should give you all the details you need to set this up. The OS discussed is Vista, but it should work of W7 as well.

    http://forums.amd.com/devforum/messageview.cfm?FTVAR_FORUMVIEWTMP=Linear&catid=328&threadid=100142
    Tuesday, January 20, 2009 5:06 PM
  • Good find, thanks. That makes it sound like you have to create the keys even in Vista, so missing keys in 7 doesn't seem quite so strange anymore.
    Wednesday, January 21, 2009 6:17 AM
  • For win 7 64 .. TDR

    ok here we go.. command prompt - regedit - HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE

                                                                      - HARDWARE

                                                                          -DEVICEMAP

                                                                                 -VIDEO

    find the file type REG_DWORD ,, double click,, type in new value,, 0 turns of TDR

    Sunday, August 14, 2011 11:23 PM
  • I love you...I've been trying to figure out what's causing my gfx card to reset itself and finally find out it was the tdr settings, but I couldn't find anywhere on how to change it..ty so much
    Wednesday, August 17, 2011 12:50 AM
  • Hey guys I'm having the same issue but I can't get this command prompt to work.    I'm new to command prompts by they way.  So I'm going to Accessories>command prompt> then adding          regedit - HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE     but I'm getting a message saying

    Adding information can unintentionally change or delete values...........

    Then I get another error saying

    Cannot import HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE:  Error opening the file there may be a disk or file system error. 

     

    I'm not playing games I'm using revit (an architectural modeling program)  So I'm losing work that I've done every time it crashes and it crashes every hour or so. 

     

    Please help.  Looking forward to your reply.

     

    Richard

    Friday, September 16, 2011 3:04 AM
  • Richard,

    I had the same problem.  The work around is: Press Start, Search "regedit", launch the program that comes up, use the file system on the side and click the drop down arrow on HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, then HARDWARE, then DEVICEMAP, then double click VIDEO, a file named MaxObjectNumber shows up in the directory with the Type REG_DWORD, this is your TDR Timeout setting, 0 = Off and any positive number will set a delay.

    Sincerely,

    PoLoMoTo

    Tuesday, October 18, 2011 1:02 AM
  •  Whats so strange about all this is I have an I-7-840 which runs gr8 and a new build AMD 1100 6 core that has the infamous Display driver not responding glitch. The AMD gets this with both my vid cards (Gforce 560 & ASUS 5870)

    I tried reducing the clock speeds, changing drivers, dif Ram, and on and on for 3 Months and Im so glad I found this link to turn off the TDR. I have read why Microsoft put it in there from XP on, but by turning it off is it resolving why it was going off in my system. Is it really just the FPS fluxuating down so low to cause this? It always happens with me when I am gaming hard.


    • Edited by Xistance Tuesday, November 01, 2011 6:40 PM
    Tuesday, November 01, 2011 6:38 PM
  • I found a thread in AMD/ATI's forums that should give you all the details you need to set this up. The OS discussed is Vista, but it should work of W7 as well.

    http://forums.amd.com/devforum/messageview.cfm?FTVAR_FORUMVIEWTMP=Linear&catid=328&threadid=100142

    page not found

     


    Windows MVP 2010-11, XP, Vista, 7. Expanding into Windows Server 2008 R2, SQL Server, SharePoint, Cloud, Virtualization etc. etc.

    Hardcore Games, Legendary is the only Way to Play

    Developer | Windows IT | Chess | Economics | Vegan Advocate | PC Reviews

    Tuesday, November 01, 2011 6:59 PM
  •   I was able to disable the Timeout Detection and Recovery. Mine was set to 6 but could not save it and after I did a re-boot it went back to 6. Do you have to disable it every time you boot or did I miss something. I did follow these ins. below, but could not double click on Video, but did open from MaxObjectNumber.

    ----------------------------------------------------------

    click the drop down arrow on HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, then HARDWARE, then DEVICEMAP, then double click VIDEO, a file named MaxObjectNumber shows up in the directory with the Type REG_DWORD, this is your TDR Timeout setting, 0 = Off and any positive number will set a delay.

    Wednesday, November 02, 2011 1:49 PM
  • I have same problem when i do the regedit like this find the file type REG_DWORD ,, double click,, type in new value,, 0 turns of TDR  when i reboot it changes back to 5 Plz help,.,.,.,.,.,.
    Wednesday, November 30, 2011 7:41 AM
  • Has anybody figured out how to save this change. The only way I can avoid the "display driver stopped working" error is to not install the CCC " Catalyst Control Center" and install the driver only.  But I am unable to save my changes as previously stated.
    Tuesday, January 10, 2012 10:14 PM
  • http://www.hardcore-games.tk/wp/tdr.php

    Windows MVP 2010-11, XP, Vista, 7. Expanding into Windows Server 2008 R2, SQL Server, SharePoint, Cloud, Virtualization etc. etc.

    Hardcore Games, Legendary is the only Way to Play

    Developer | Windows IT | Chess | Economics | Vegan Advocate | PC Reviews

    Tuesday, January 10, 2012 10:18 PM
  • It is more than just that. This is a brand new dell alienware. It is easy for them to throw that out there when that is not the real problem. I found this on the microsoft site and I was able to change the value to 0, it is a timeout value, and this makes more sense. Will test tomorrow.

     

     

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/gg487368.aspx

     

    Timeout Detection and Recovery of GPUs through WDDM

    Updated: April 27, 2009

    On This Page

    Introduction Introduction
    Timeout Detection and Recovery Timeout Detection and Recovery
    Windows Vista SP1 Update Windows Vista SP1 Update
    Error Messaging Error Messaging
    Registry Keys Registry Keys
    Next Steps Next Steps
    Resources Resources


    Introduction

    One of the most common stability problems in graphics is when the system appears completely "frozen" or "hung" while processing an end-user command or operation. Users generally wait a few seconds and then reboot the system by pressing the Power button. Usually the graphics processing unit (GPU) is "busy" processing intensive graphical operations, typically during gameplay. This results in nothing being updated on the screen, thus appearing to the user that the system is frozen.

    This paper briefly describes the timeout detection and recovery (TDR) process in Windows Vista. It also documents the registry controls so developers can easily debug problems.

    What's New for Windows Vista SP1
    Changes for Windows Vista SP1 to improve user experience in cases of frequent and rapidly occurring GPU hangs. New registry keys to support these changes.

    Timeout Detection and Recovery

    Windows Vista attempts to detect these problematic hang situations and recover a responsive desktop dynamically. In this process, the Windows Display Driver Model (WDDM) driver is reinitialized and the GPU is reset. No reboot is necessary, which greatly enhances the user experience. The only visible artifact from the hang detection to the recovery is a screen flicker, which results from resetting some portions of the graphics stack, causing a screen redraw. Some older Microsoft DirectX applications may render to a black screen at the end of this recovery. The end user would have to restart these applications.

    The following is a brief overview of the TDR process:

    1. Timeout detection: The Video Scheduler component of the Windows Vista graphics stack detects that the GPU is taking more than the permitted quantum time to execute the particular task and tries to preempt this particular task. The preempt operation has a "wait" timeout—the actual "TDR timeout." This step is thus the "timeout detection" phase of the process. The default timeout period in Windows Vista is 2 seconds. If the GPU cannot complete or preempt the current task within the TDR timeout, then the GPU is diagnosed as hung.

    2. Preparation for recovery: The operating system informs the WDDM driver that a timeout has been detected and it must reset the GPU. The driver is told to stop accessing memory and should not access hardware after this time. The operating system and the WDDM driver collect hardware and other state information that could be useful for post-mortem diagnosis.

    3. Desktop recovery: The operating system resets the appropriate state of the graphics stack. The Video Memory Manager component of the graphics stack purges all allocations from video memory. The WDDM driver resets the GPU hardware state. The graphics stack takes the final actions and restores the desktop to the responsive state. As mentioned earlier, some older DirectX applications may now render just black, and the user may be required to restart these applications. Well-written DirectX 9Ex and DirectX 10 applications that handle "Device Remove" continue to work correctly. The application must release and then recreate its Microsoft Direct3D device and all of its objects. DirectX application programmers can find more information in the Windows SDK.

    Windows Vista SP1 Update

    Minor changes were made in Windows Vista SP1 to improve the user experience in cases of frequent and rapidly occurring GPU hangs. Repetitive GPU hangs indicate that the graphics hardware has not recovered successfully. In these instances, the system must be shut down and restarted to fully reset the graphics hardware. If the operating system detects that six or more GPU hangs and subsequent recoveries occur within 1 minute, then the following GPU hang is treated as a system bug check.

    Error Messaging

    Throughout the process of GPU hang detection and recovery, the desktop is unresponsive and thus unavailable to the user. In the final stages of recovery, a brief screen flash occurs that is similar to the one when the screen resolution is changed. After the desktop has been successfully recovered, the following informational message appears to the user.

    Error Messaging

    The message is also logged in the Windows Vista Event Viewer. Diagnosis information is collected in the form of a debug report that is returned to Microsoft through the Online Crash Analysis (OCA) mechanism if the user opts in to provide feedback.

    Registry Keys

    The following registry keys are documented for testing purposes only. These registry keys should not be manipulated by any applications outside targeted testing or debugging.

    The TDR-related registry keys are located under HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\GraphicsDrivers.

    • TdrLevel: REG_DWORD. The initial level of recovery. The possible values are:

      • TdrLevelOff (0). – Detection disabled.

      • TdrLevelBugcheck (1) – Bug check on detected timeout, for example, no recovery.

      • TdrLevelRecoverVGA (2) – Recover to VGA (not implemented).

      • TdrLevelRecover(3) – Recover on timeout. This is the default value.

    • TdrDelay: REG_DWORD. The number of seconds that the GPU is allowed to delay the preempt request from the scheduler. This is effectively the timeout threshold. The default value is 2.

    • TdrDdiDelay: REG_DWORD. The number of seconds that the operating system allows threads to leave the driver. After a specified time, the operating system bug checks the system with the code VIDEO_TDR_FAILURE (0x116). The default value is 5.

    • TdrTestMode: REG_DWORD: Internal test usage.

    • TdrDebugMode: REG_DWORD: The debugging-related behavior of the TDR process.

      • TDR_DEBUG_MODE_OFF (0) breaks to kernel debugger before the recovery to allow investigation of the timeout.

      • TDR_DEBUG_MODE_IGNORE_TIMEOUT (1) ignores any timeout.

      • TDR_DEBUG_MODE_RECOVER_NO_PROMPT (2) recovers without break into the debugger. This is the default value.

      • TDR_DEBUG_MODE_RECOVER_UNCONDITIONAL (3) recovers even if some recovery conditions are not met (for example, recovers on consecutive timeouts).

    • TdrLimitTime: REG_DWORD (Windows Vista SP1 and later versions only): The default time within which a "TdrLimitCount" number of TDRs are allowed without crashing the system.

    • TdrLimitCount: REG_DWORD (Windows Vista SP1 and later versions only): The default number of TDRs (0x117) that are allowed in "TdrLimitTime" without crashing the system.

    Next Steps

    Graphics hardware vendors:

    • Ensure that graphics operations (that is, DMA buffer completion) take no more than 2 seconds in end-user scenarios such as productivity and gameplay.

    Graphics software vendors:

    • Ensure that the DirectX graphics application does not run at a low frames per second (FPS) rate. As the FPS decreases, the likelihood of the GPU getting reset increases. If the application is running at 10 FPS or lower and a complex graphics operation is about to start, then a flush can be inserted.

    • For running benchmark tests on low-end GPUs, use the aforementioned registry keys that control the TDR timeout. Remember that they should not be used in production systems because it would affect overall system stability and robustness. Use these keys only as a final solution.

    System manufacturers:

    • Work with the graphics hardware vendor to diagnose the TDR debug reports.

    • Remember that any system that uses the aforementioned TDR registry keys to change the default values is a Windows Logo Program violation.

    Tuesday, January 10, 2012 10:28 PM
  • Wednesday, January 11, 2012 4:13 AM
  • Nice and long post, but have u read what was the question about? 

    Does anyone know how to adjust settings for the Timeout Detection and Recovery of GPUs in 7? I found an article on Technet detailing how to turn TDR off in Vista, but the registry keys it mentions don't seem to exist in 7.

    Saturday, July 27, 2013 7:23 PM