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Boot Problem - Classpnp.sys

    Question

  • Ok, first I'll start by saying that I'm not exactly knowledgeable when it comes to computer problems, so I apologise if there's a simple solution to my problem.


    Previously, my laptop (Vaio VGN-NW11S) was working perfectly fine.
    However, now it simply refuses to load Windows.

    I get as far as the "Starting Windows" screen, but then it simply refuses to go any further.

    Starting in Safe Mode, the last line to appear is
    "Loaded: \windows\System32\DRIVERS\CLASSPNP.SYS"
    At which point, it simply refuses to go any further.


    I've tried inserting the Windows 7 disk and selecting "Repair", but the problem still persists.
    Saturday, January 16, 2010 3:14 PM

Answers

  • It should be a hardware problem.

    I suggest updating BIOS or restoring it to default settings first. Some users resolved this error by disabling AHCI in BIOS. For the detailed steps about how to configure BIOS, please refer to the computer manual. In addition, if any
    unnecessary hardware device is connected, please remove it. If it still does not work, you may need to replace the drive and reinstall system.


    Vivian Xing - MSFT
    • Marked as answer by Vivian Xing Monday, January 25, 2010 6:52 AM
    Wednesday, January 20, 2010 2:58 AM
  • Thats not a good sign, but not a problem with letting it go overnight.

    If it is in the same spot in the morning, more than likely you have a bad hard drive (you can confirm this by running the manf diagnostics software).

    Good Luck!
    • Marked as answer by Vivian Xing Monday, January 25, 2010 6:53 AM
    Monday, January 18, 2010 12:22 AM

All replies

  • Then you might have some corruption possibly, from safe mode run sfc /scannow to see if it finds any errors and whether or not it can repair them all. We need to find out what the next entry is after that classpnp.sys because that's what's stopping it.

    Was this an upgrade from Vista? Did you recently install any new programs? Did you run some junk registry fixer that you found on the internet? (you can tell I have a very dim view of that stuff causes more problems then it fixes in my opinion).

    Have you updated your bios to the latest version yet? Have you updated any drivers from Vaio? you also haven't identified your laptop. I can find it on other sites, but not on Sony's site. There will be a model number on the bottom of your laptop that is more detailed. What is that COMPLETE model #  

    Explain exactly how you tried to perform the repair?  Here's how you'll want to run Startup Repair http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/What-are-the-system-recovery-options-in-Windows-7

    If your computer's system is severely damaged and you cannot access the System Recovery Options menu on your computer, you can access it using the Windows 7 installation disc or a system repair disc you created earlier.

    To use this method, you need to restart (boot) your computer using the disc.

    1. Insert the disc.

    2. Restart your computer using the computer's power button.

    3. If prompted, press any key to start Windows from the installation disc.

      • If your computer isn't configured to start from a CD or DVD, check the information that came with your computer. You may need to change your computer's BIOS settings. For more information, see BIOS: frequently asked questions.

    4. Choose your language settings, and then click Next.

    5. If you are using the Windows installation disc, click Repair your computer.

    6. Select the Windows installation you want to repair, and then click Next.

    7. On the System Recovery Options menu, click a tool to open it.


    MCSE, MCSA, MCDST [If this post helps to resolve your issue, please click the "Mark as Answer" or "Helpful" button at the top of this message. By marking a post as Answered, or Helpful you help others find the answer faster.]
    Saturday, January 16, 2010 10:09 PM
  • The the repair isn't working, then you may want to see if you have a diagnostics partition.

    Try F10 / F12 on boot (one time boot menu varies on laptops) and select Diagnostics.

    If you don't have it, I would attempt a fresh install of Windows, letting Windows create the windows.old folder so you have your data. If you have sensitive data that you dont want lost, you may want to bring this to a local IT company to have it looked at.

    Good Luck!
    Saturday, January 16, 2010 10:38 PM
  • Personally I wouldn't take it to the local geek shop, you pay big bucks just to have them dork it up and lose his data (just a personal opinion here, no disrespect). Onboard disgnostics will just tell him if he has a hardware problem, in his case, not likely the problem. If he has data, if he can go into safe mode, he can back it up. At this point we don't know yet if he has a windows.old folder.

    If it was previously working fine (we don't know for how long), he can always do a system restore from backup which would retain the vast majority of his data. But we'll get to that as soon as he provides more data ;)

    MCSE, MCSA, MCDST [If this post helps to resolve your issue, please click the "Mark as Answer" or "Helpful" button at the top of this message. By marking a post as Answered, or Helpful you help others find the answer faster.]
    Saturday, January 16, 2010 11:05 PM
  • Sorry about the Model Number.  The number on the bottom reads "PCG-7171M"

    When I bought it, it was running Vista, but was sent an upgrade disk to 7.

    I tried running Startup Repair, but was presented with the following message;

    Windows cannot repair this computer automatically

    If you have recently attached a device to this computer, such as a camera or portable music player, remove it and restart your computer.  If you continue to see this message, contact your system administrator or computer manufacturer for assistance."



    And when I attempt to run the F10 Boot Diagnostics, I get another message  (this time just white text on a black background)

    Windows Boot Manager

    Windows has encountered a problem communicating with a device connected to your computer.
    This error can be caused by unplugging a removable storage device such as an external USB drive while the device is in use, or by faulty hardware such as a hard drive or CD-ROM drive that is failing.  Make sure any removable storage is properly connected and then restart your computer.

    If you continue to receive this error message, contact the hardware manufacturer.

       Status:  0xc00000e9
       Info:  An unexpected I/O error has occurred

    Sunday, January 17, 2010 12:22 PM
  • Based on that -  I would say one of 3 things:

    Bad CD/DVD drive / Windows Image
    Bad HDD - test with manf diagnostic software / Boot to your Windows 7 Disc (if possible), go to repair to get a command prompt open -  run chkdsk /r
    DVD drive does not like the type of DVD Windows is on (rare).

    Try making a USB install - http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/2432-usb-windows-7-installation-key-drive-create.html


    Sunday, January 17, 2010 7:49 PM
  • I tried running chkdsk /r,
    but when I tried to, I was presented with the message
    "The Type of the file system is NTFS.
    Cannot lock current drive.
    Windows cannot run disk checking on this volume because it is write protected."
    Sunday, January 17, 2010 8:13 PM
  • Sorry - you have to include the drive letter - so chkdsk c: /r
    Sunday, January 17, 2010 8:32 PM
  • Ah!
    I should invest in some common sense some time!
    Thanks for that.

    I'm currently running Chkdsk, but it's been stuck at 12% on stage 4 for almost an hour and a half.
    The Hard Disk light is flickering every now and then, and there's a faint sound of Disk Access  (it was normally pretty quiet),
    so I'll leave it running overnight and see if it improves.
    Sunday, January 17, 2010 10:34 PM
  • Thats not a good sign, but not a problem with letting it go overnight.

    If it is in the same spot in the morning, more than likely you have a bad hard drive (you can confirm this by running the manf diagnostics software).

    Good Luck!
    • Marked as answer by Vivian Xing Monday, January 25, 2010 6:53 AM
    Monday, January 18, 2010 12:22 AM
  • Looks like it's a bad Hard Drive.
    I'm guessing that the only way to remedy this would be to replace the drive?
    Monday, January 18, 2010 7:30 AM
  • If chkdsk locks up and the manf diag software shows it as failing - I wouldn't touch it anymore. Replace the drive and install Windows 7 (although you could have a failing motherboard controller, its most likely the drive).

    From there you can buy a USB to IDE/SATA adapter and hopefully recover any data you have stored on the drive.

    For Example - ( http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812156102 )

    Have a good one and good luck!
    Monday, January 18, 2010 7:35 AM
  • Yes, replace the drive and if you have the system image with your backup on a separate drive, do a system image restore. http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Restore-your-computer-from-a-system-image-backup    If you didn't do a system image backup but did do a backup of your data, then do a clean install and get everthing working, then restore your data.
    MCSE, MCSA, MCDST [If this post helps to resolve your issue, please click the "Mark as Answer" or "Helpful" button at the top of this message. By marking a post as Answered, or Helpful you help others find the answer faster.]
    Monday, January 18, 2010 7:40 AM
  • It should be a hardware problem.

    I suggest updating BIOS or restoring it to default settings first. Some users resolved this error by disabling AHCI in BIOS. For the detailed steps about how to configure BIOS, please refer to the computer manual. In addition, if any
    unnecessary hardware device is connected, please remove it. If it still does not work, you may need to replace the drive and reinstall system.


    Vivian Xing - MSFT
    • Marked as answer by Vivian Xing Monday, January 25, 2010 6:52 AM
    Wednesday, January 20, 2010 2:58 AM
  • It should be a hardware problem.

    I suggest updating BIOS or restoring it to default settings first. Some users resolved this error by disabling AHCI in BIOS. For the detailed steps about how to configure BIOS, please refer to the computer manual. In addition, if any
    unnecessary hardware device is connected, please remove it. If it still does not work, you may need to replace the drive and reinstall system.


    Vivian Xing - MSFT


    FINALLY!!!  After 6-8 hours (I don't even know how long I've been at this), you nailed it!! Changed AHCI to COMPATABILITY, and FINALLY broke free of the black screen!!

    Still trying to repair system, but at least I made progres!!

    Sunday, April 17, 2011 6:54 AM
  • Had this just happen to a co-worker's 32bit Windows 7 machine on a Dell Optiplex 780.

    Repair/restore didn't solve the problem (internal or run from the Windows 7 disc). After re-seating all the hardware, booted into safe mode w/networking and was about to perform a chkdsk (still suspecting a faulty hard drive or CD drive) when I realized that windows thought there were 2 CD/DVD drives when actually there was only one. Exploring the properties of the unfamiliar drive I found that this ghost drive was installed at Location 0, same spot as the hard drive.

    I uninstalled the mysterious drive from the properties dialog and rebooted. Success! Checked for failed drivers or failed Windows updates and found none.

    Back in a regular logged in account I realized the drive still existed, identified as a BD-ROM Drive, driver DTSoftBusCD00, and still installed at Location 0. This was a Daemon Tools virtual drive that was created when I mounted software ISOs when we first ordered the machine. I hadn't realized it made a persistent drive like this.

    Everything seems to be stable though, and a virus scan came up with nothing. Perhaps it's just a hiccup that happens with these virtual drive tools.

    Don't know if this will help anyone but hopefully it provides another option to eliminate in the search for a 'cure'.

     

    Wednesday, May 18, 2011 6:47 PM
  • I just had a client with a similar issue.

     

    1. Reboot the computer

    2. Tap the F8 Key on the keyboard until you see the Windows Advanced Options menu

    3. Using the arrow keys, select Last Known Good Configuration (your most recent settings that worked) and press enter

     

    This booted into Windows and took approximately 15 minutes to load but Windows did load correctly. Do allow some time for the computer to boot even up to an hour.

    I would also suggest running a check disk and backing up the computer.

    • Proposed as answer by EyeOnTech Wednesday, September 14, 2011 2:44 AM
    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 2:39 AM
  • i spent a few hours going over and over this problem and trying various solutions then finally in a flash of inspiration i solved it!

    It was something a little more simple then all the other solutions and to be honest i should have thought of this before i played too much as would have saved a hole lot of time...what was it u ask???

    Well it was the computer over heating as the the cpu fan was wearing a winter blanket from all the dust!

    Cleaned the fan put the computer back together and it worked!

    Tuesday, May 15, 2012 7:25 PM