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Max Number of CPU (Cores) that Windows 7 64 Bit Will Recognize?

    Question

  • Hello World,

    Does anyone know what the max number of CPU's (cores) that Windows 7 64bit will support or recognize.  I currently have a Tyan quad socket motherboard that has 32GB of RAM and QTY 4 AMD 8354 2.2Ghz Quad Cores processors, total 16 Cores.

    Will Windows 7 64Bit See this?

    Thanks,

    Daniel
    Sunday, December 13, 2009 5:58 PM

Answers

  • It's a bit difficult to find the information from an official source, but I have read that Win7 Home Premium is limited to a single CPU socket. Pro and Ultimate are limited to 2.

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7itprohardware/thread/562b2642-1a22-48c8-85ba-54d1cbbd13d1

    As far as I know, there is no practical limit to the number of cores that can be used with a single physical socket. (I have a Core I7 920 CPU, and Win7 Home Premium. It has 4 cores, and it supports hyperthreading, so Win7 shows 8 CPUs.)

    Sound like you'll need a server OS to use more sockets.
    Sunday, December 13, 2009 6:49 PM
  • You have to read the End User's License Agreement (EULA) for each product to get the correct answer.  If you read the EULA for Win 7 Ultimate the answer is two (2) processors noted under:

    2. INSTALLATION AND USE RIGHTS.

    b. Licensed Computer.

    You may use the software on up to two processors on the licensed computer at one time. Unless otherwise provided in these license terms, you may not use the software on any other computer.


    You can download the individual EULA from http://www.microsoft.com/about/legal/useterms/

    • Proposed as answer by Rick Dee Monday, December 14, 2009 5:07 PM
    • Marked as answer by Sean Zhu -Moderator Tuesday, December 15, 2009 7:43 AM
    Monday, December 14, 2009 12:10 PM

All replies

  • It's a bit difficult to find the information from an official source, but I have read that Win7 Home Premium is limited to a single CPU socket. Pro and Ultimate are limited to 2.

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7itprohardware/thread/562b2642-1a22-48c8-85ba-54d1cbbd13d1

    As far as I know, there is no practical limit to the number of cores that can be used with a single physical socket. (I have a Core I7 920 CPU, and Win7 Home Premium. It has 4 cores, and it supports hyperthreading, so Win7 shows 8 CPUs.)

    Sound like you'll need a server OS to use more sockets.
    Sunday, December 13, 2009 6:49 PM
  • You have to read the End User's License Agreement (EULA) for each product to get the correct answer.  If you read the EULA for Win 7 Ultimate the answer is two (2) processors noted under:

    2. INSTALLATION AND USE RIGHTS.

    b. Licensed Computer.

    You may use the software on up to two processors on the licensed computer at one time. Unless otherwise provided in these license terms, you may not use the software on any other computer.


    You can download the individual EULA from http://www.microsoft.com/about/legal/useterms/

    • Proposed as answer by Rick Dee Monday, December 14, 2009 5:07 PM
    • Marked as answer by Sean Zhu -Moderator Tuesday, December 15, 2009 7:43 AM
    Monday, December 14, 2009 12:10 PM
  • Thanks to you BOTH!..

    Seems I will have to stick to my Server x64 OS for now, if not I would loose 8 Cores.  Just thought I would push the limits of Windows 7 x64.  Oh well!

    Danny Max
    Monday, December 14, 2009 5:11 PM
  • You have to read the End User's License Agreement (EULA) for each product to get the correct answer.  If you read the EULA for Win 7 Ultimate the answer is two (2) processors noted under:

    2. INSTALLATION AND USE RIGHTS.

    b. Licensed Computer.

     

    You may use the software on up to two processors on the licensed computer at one time. Unless otherwise provided in these license terms, you may not use the software on any other computer.


    You can download the individual EULA from http://www.microsoft.com/about/legal/useterms/

     

    A side note: for Win7 Home Premium, the license states:

    c.   Licensed Computer. You may use the software on up to two processors on the licensed computer at one time. Unless otherwise provided in these license terms, you may not use the software on any other computer.

    This is apparently an error. It's of no great concern for me, as I have no plans to go to a dual-socket system, but I have read complaints from people who have tried to support dual socketed motherboards with Win7 HP. (Doesn't work; Pro or Ultimate are required.)
    Monday, December 14, 2009 7:23 PM
  • Hope this info will help...

    PCs with multi-core processors:
    Windows 7 was designed to work with today's multi-core processors. All 32-bit versions of Windows 7 can support up to 32 processor cores, while 64‑bit versions can support up to 256 processor cores.

    PCs with multiple processors (CPUs):
    Commercial servers, workstations, and other high-end PCs may have more than one physical processor. Windows 7 Professional, Enterprise, and Ultimate allow for two physical processors, providing the best performance on these computers. Windows 7Starter, Home Basic, and Home Premium will recognize only one physical processor.

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/products/system-requirements

    Monday, January 24, 2011 1:40 PM