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Windows is unable to install to the selected location. Error: 0x80300024

    Question

  • When I try to install to Drive 0 to the fourth partition on that drive, I get the following error - "Windows is unable to install to the selected location. Error: 0x80300024." This happens whether I create the primary partition with Vista, or with the Windows 7 RC install disk. I have tried reducing the size of the partition a bit and still get this error. I was also getting this same error with the Windows 7 Beta. This drive is a 1 terrabyte Western Digital SATA II. I also have 2 other SATA II drives in this system.
    Wednesday, May 20, 2009 2:45 AM

Answers

  • GregB1-

    You said "I want it on Disk 0 so I can have a dual boot setup . I don't want to lose my original Vista Ultimate installation since this is not a production OS yet."

    That is what you want. With all that space on discs x,y,z,etc,etc,etc. why don't you just install W7RC to disk1 or disc2? You would still have dual boot. Anyway, it worked for me. And I dual boot Vista Home Basic 32bit with W7RC Ultimate 64bit. Leave disc0 to Vista, I say.
    Regards from the Valley of the Sun.
    • Marked as answer by GregB1 Tuesday, June 02, 2009 1:54 PM
    Sunday, May 31, 2009 6:45 AM
  • Editing the boot.ini was not an option on my system since the old XP boot manager is no longer there and my system now has the Vista/Windows 7 boot manager. I found that I must have a boot manager installed on both Disk 0 (Vista), and Disk 2 (Windows 7).

    Using EasyBCD on Disk 0 didn't work because once I added an entry for Windows 7, choosing Windows 7 at boot-time produced a driver signature error and it wouldn't let me use the Windows 7 choice.

    Changing my BIOS to boot first from Disk 2; booting Windows 7; and using EasyBCD worked. I used EasyBCD from Windows 7 to add an entry to the boot menu for Windows Vista on Disk 0 and all is fine now.

    I think the current version of EasyBCD is probably not handling adding a Windows 7 entry correctly. The current production version I used (1.7 I think) did not have a choice for Windows 7 in the dropdown box, so I had to use the Vista/Longhorn choice when trying to add a Windows 7 boot manager entry. Perhaps I could have registered and downloaded the beta version of EasyBCD....but all is working now with an OS on 2 different physical drives.

    Thanks for the ideas!
    • Marked as answer by GregB1 Tuesday, June 02, 2009 1:54 PM
    Tuesday, June 02, 2009 1:53 PM

All replies

  • When we install Windows 7 RC or beta, a new small partition will be created. This partition exists as boot partition for Windows 7 systems. As we know, we could not create more than 4 partitions. Therefore, I suggest that you unload one of the partitions and then try to install again.
    Arthur Xie - MSFT
    Friday, May 22, 2009 6:32 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks Arthur, your information gave me something to try, but I am still not able to install Windows 7 RC. I am getting the same error message. Here is what I tried....

    Here is the configuration I started with:

    Disk 0 is a 1 terrabyte Western Digital drive. (a 91.67 Gig System, Boot, Page File, Active, Primary Partition called C: when Vista is running)
                                                                     (a Primary 10.74 Gig Partition Called D:)
                                                                     (an 829.1 Gig Primary Partition called E:) 
    Disk 1 is a 230 Gig Western Digital drive. (1 Primary Partition called F:)
    Disk 2 is a 320 Gig Western Digital drive. (1 Primary Partition called N:)
    Disk 3 is a 500 Gig Western Digital MyBook USB drive called Q:
    Disk 4 is a 4 Gig SanDisk Contour USB flashdrive used for ReadyBoost (Primary Partition called K:)
    Disk 5 is called L: and is part of a card reader.
    Disk 6 is called M: and is part of a card reader.
    Disk 7 is called O: and is part of a card reader.
    Disk 8 is called P: and is part of a card reader


    1. I first tried just eliminating the 10.74 Gig D: partition on Disk 0 and Windows 7 RC would not install to a 100 Gig Partition on Drive 0 called J: (I left the former D: unallocated).
        So I thought that maybe Windows 7 had to be installed in a partition next to the Vista Ultimate Partition C: 
     
    2. After making a good backup, I eliminated all partitions on Disk 0 except the first partition that contains Vista Ultimate 64bit.
    3. I then created a 100 Gig Partition next to the C: Vista Partition on Disk 0 for Windows 7. I then recreated the D: 10.74 Gig Partition and left the rest unallocated.
    4. Windows 7 RC would not install and gave me the same Error 0x80300024 message.
    5. I formatted the Windows 7 RC partition and still received the same 0x80300024 message when trying to install.
    6. I removed the D: partition from Disk 0 so that only the Vista partition and the Windows 7 100 Gig partition was there (and the rest of the 1T Disk 0 unallocated)
        I still received the 0x80300024 error message when trying to install Windows 7 RC.
    7. I have also tried the install with the D: partition deleted and the E: partition in-place (about 700 Gig - 829 Gig in size). This did not work and I got the same 0x80300024 message.
    8. I think I have tried almost every combination possible on Disk 0 with the Windows 7 RC partition formated and unformatted and with it in various sizes.
    9. I finally restored Drive 0 to it's original configuration and gave up for now.

    Can anyone tell me how to get past this Error: 0x80300024? I don't know what else to try. I want it on Disk 0 so I can have a dual boot setup. I don't want to lose my original Vista Ultimate installation since this is not a production OS yet. Please help!


    Monday, May 25, 2009 5:41 PM
  • GregB1,

    This is a solution for installing Windows Vista, however it may help you.
    Monday, May 25, 2009 6:18 PM
    Answerer
  • I've seen that link's contents before when I did a search on this error. I don't really understand that thread and how to make the change that is being mentioned there.
    Tuesday, May 26, 2009 3:36 AM
  • Hi,

    I suggest that you try the following method.

    1. Delete a partition, for example, drive D on the Disk 0.
    2. Start to install Windows 7.
    3. During installation, do not select any partitions, but choose "Drive Options".
    4. Create a new partition with the unallocated space.
    5. Continue to install.

    How do you manage partitions in system, with a third party partition tool?


    Arthur Xie - MSFT
    Wednesday, May 27, 2009 7:30 AM
    Moderator
  • Arthur,
        Actually, I already did that several times in the process of trying different partition configurations. I don't use any special partition manager really. Any partitioning that I have done has been done with the Windows installation disk - in this case the Windows RC Install Disk. I do have to admit that I recently switched from a 320Gig WD hard drive over to this 1T WD drive. It came with software to copy the old disk over to the new one. I'm stumped on this problem.
    Thursday, May 28, 2009 2:51 AM
  • Hi Arthur,
     
    I hadn't heard any suggestions for my problem, so I decided to follow your suggestions to make sure that I had tried your combination.

    1. I used Vista Ultimate 64 computer management to delete the D: drive partition on Disk 0. I shrank my E: drive partition on Disk 0 so that I would have enough to install Windows
        7 RC in it's own bootable partition (as before).
    2. I started installing Windows 7 RC.
    3. During the installation, I chose "Drive Options".
    4. I created a new partition at the end of Disk 0 using 108 Gig of space that I had shrunk out of my E: drive partition on Disk 0.
    5. Continued installing into this new partition and got the same 0x80300024 error again when continuing to install to that partition.
    6. Formatted the new 108 Gig partition and got the same 0x80300024 error again when continuing the install to that partition.
    7. Deleted the 108 Gig partition (still in the Windows 7 RC install), and selected the unallocated space where the 108 Gig was. I still got the 0x80300024 error
        when continuing to try to install there.

    What's going on here? Any ideas anyone? How to I get Windows 7 RC installed for dual boot on this system?

    Greg.
    Sunday, May 31, 2009 2:48 AM
  • GregB1,

    Please read this thread. There is a setting in the Vista tool to shrink the partition that may have caused this. You might have to use a 3rd party tool to re-partition the drive.
    Sunday, May 31, 2009 3:04 AM
    Answerer
  • GregB1-

    You said "I want it on Disk 0 so I can have a dual boot setup . I don't want to lose my original Vista Ultimate installation since this is not a production OS yet."

    That is what you want. With all that space on discs x,y,z,etc,etc,etc. why don't you just install W7RC to disk1 or disc2? You would still have dual boot. Anyway, it worked for me. And I dual boot Vista Home Basic 32bit with W7RC Ultimate 64bit. Leave disc0 to Vista, I say.
    Regards from the Valley of the Sun.
    • Marked as answer by GregB1 Tuesday, June 02, 2009 1:54 PM
    Sunday, May 31, 2009 6:45 AM
  • piepaw,
       I tried what you suggested and was able to install Windows 7 RC on disk 2. I first had to delete the partitions on it and create a new one - a 100 Gig partition for Windows 7 RC. This allowed the install of Windows 7 RC, but the installation did not add an entry to the boot manager. I now have to enter my bios and reorder the hard drive boot disks to switch between Vista on disk 0 and Windows 7 RC on disk 2. When I get time I'll try editing the file that the boot manager on drive 0 uses - I think iti is an .ini file but I'll look that up. I haven't had to do that for a while so I forget the name of it.

    Monday, June 01, 2009 3:23 PM
  • dwalters,
       That thread isn't very helpful to me. I don't really know xml (just a smattering from a class a long time ago). I'm not sure what "answer file" he is talking about, and it isn't clear how I would go about changing the settings that are mentioned there. I guess I need a more basic explanation.

    Monday, June 01, 2009 3:26 PM
  • GregB1-

    Since it installed and now it just doesn't show the option at boot time, I suggest that you try the free download for EasyBCD that so many have suggested on this site.

    Also, look back at your 2nd post item#2, you said you made a good backup of your Vista C: drive. I would suggest that you boot into Vista and restore your C: drive from there to the condition it was at before all these changes. I fear that you may have done some damage to your D: drive, which may have been your system recovery drive (I think).
    Regards from the Valley of the Sun.
    Monday, June 01, 2009 4:47 PM
  • piepaw,
       I hadn't noticed talk of EasyBCD before you mentioned it. What version should I use? I know there is a beta version that their website forum suggests in some instances. Why not just edit the boot.ini on disk 0?
       About my D: drive - that drive was simply a 10 Gig drive (partition) that I've been using for Roxio Media Creator's temporary files when making DVDs.

    Monday, June 01, 2009 5:09 PM
  • GregB1-

    I haven't had the (pleasure?) of using EasyBCD myself, luckily never having the need. I've read several accounts that report good results with the Beta version.

    Glad to hear about your D: drive not being a recovery type of thing.

    Good luck and Happy Computing!
    Regards from the Valley of the Sun.
    Monday, June 01, 2009 5:25 PM
  • piepaw,

    I'll post here what I do and how it turns out.

    I'm inclined to just edit the boot.ini while in Vista since I've done this successfully in the past when I was running a dual-boot configuration with Vista and XP Pro 64. (I got rid of XP a long time ago). boot.ini does allow you to specify the disk number.

    Thanks for your responses. It's a shame that I couldn't get my machine set up to dual-boot from disk 0 for both operating systems.

    Monday, June 01, 2009 5:38 PM
  • I see you're still in ivestigations, but it might help: I read somewhere, don't know where exactly, that the Windows 7 RC bootloader has problems with Grub (Linux) boot loader present or previously present on the system.

    And maybe before you run the Win7 setup do a FixMBR so Windows 7 can write a fresh bootloader?
    Monday, June 01, 2009 6:12 PM
  • Giesha79,

    I've never used Linux so that should not be a problem.

    Currently, I have Vista and Windows 7 RC installed on separate physical hard drives. As stated previously, the boot manager does not come up with a choice of which OS to run. This is true no matter which hard drive I set my BIOS to try to boot from first. See the previous posts here.

    Thanks for the info. 

    Monday, June 01, 2009 6:22 PM
  • Editing the boot.ini was not an option on my system since the old XP boot manager is no longer there and my system now has the Vista/Windows 7 boot manager. I found that I must have a boot manager installed on both Disk 0 (Vista), and Disk 2 (Windows 7).

    Using EasyBCD on Disk 0 didn't work because once I added an entry for Windows 7, choosing Windows 7 at boot-time produced a driver signature error and it wouldn't let me use the Windows 7 choice.

    Changing my BIOS to boot first from Disk 2; booting Windows 7; and using EasyBCD worked. I used EasyBCD from Windows 7 to add an entry to the boot menu for Windows Vista on Disk 0 and all is fine now.

    I think the current version of EasyBCD is probably not handling adding a Windows 7 entry correctly. The current production version I used (1.7 I think) did not have a choice for Windows 7 in the dropdown box, so I had to use the Vista/Longhorn choice when trying to add a Windows 7 boot manager entry. Perhaps I could have registered and downloaded the beta version of EasyBCD....but all is working now with an OS on 2 different physical drives.

    Thanks for the ideas!
    • Marked as answer by GregB1 Tuesday, June 02, 2009 1:54 PM
    Tuesday, June 02, 2009 1:53 PM
  • Had the same issue. Found this thread: http://www.sevenforums.com/installation-setup/16826-error-0x80300024-2.html

    The fix is to disconnect all drives but the one you are installing Win 7 to. Then, after installation, you can reconnect the drives
    • Proposed as answer by HomicidalPanda Sunday, November 25, 2012 5:59 PM
    Monday, February 08, 2010 5:19 AM
  • I tried this, but it didn't work the first time so I did the following:

    With the Vista DVD in the drive, press Shift+F10 which brings up a command shell

    Diskpart.exe
    list disks

    My system displayed two disks; disk 0 and disk 1

    select disk=0
    Clean                    -- be careful as this wipes the disk clean of all data, volumes & partitions

    select disk=1
    Clean                   -- be careful as this wipes the disk clean of all data, volumes & partitions

    Then do exactly was Artur Xie indicates above.

    Sunday, July 04, 2010 1:04 AM
  • The easiest way to solve this problem is to simply unplug any hard drives you are not wanting to install Windows on. In the original post this would mean unplugging the other two SATA II drives before launching the Windows disk. This should clear up any problems without having to muck around.
    • Proposed as answer by Ticketmanbob Sunday, August 01, 2010 5:47 AM
    Sunday, August 01, 2010 5:46 AM
  • The easiest way to solve this problem is to simply unplug any hard drives you are not wanting to install Windows on. In the original post this would mean unplugging the other two SATA II drives before launching the Windows disk. This should clear up any problems without having to muck around.
    This worked for me after I tried different things. Thanks for the help.
    Saturday, September 18, 2010 10:12 AM
  • This is so easy to fix. After spending all day reading forms trying to figure it out. 

     

    Here is what I did:

    1. Grabbed tinkertool

    2. Showed hidden files on my mac partion

    3. Searched for "Boot" and find "startup settings" file

    4. Delete

     

    Launch Windows installer and you are all good. Its the Win7 64bit issue I was trying to work around.

    Friday, November 12, 2010 1:58 AM
  • After banging my head against the table like Steve Balmer a few times, I realised that 0x80300024 was a straight forward problem, if only it had been a little more clear than a hex code huh.  I went into BIOS and made the hdd I wanted to install to the first in boot priority, then it installed fine - Winning.
    Friday, March 25, 2011 11:04 AM
  • I got this same error while installing on a virtual machine such (Qemu, Bochs or Parallels).  In my case, it was because I did not have correct permissions for the hard disk image.  The virtual machine must have both read and write permission for the hard disk image file
    • Edited by Timothy D Legg Friday, April 01, 2011 9:27 PM de-vagueifying
    Friday, April 01, 2011 9:26 PM
  • Try to remove the other two SATA Drives..Try to creat two partition and formet the partition where you want to install windows 7.Select the particular partition and perform the installation.It should work.

     

     

    Naba Kishore Das

    Tech Support Officer

    v-2nadas@mssupport.microsoft.com

    Tech Support: 1800-936-5700

     

    Wednesday, November 09, 2011 5:01 AM
  • Changed the disk type on disk management from Dynamic to Basic and it worked for me.  Issue solved.


    • Edited by ikecar Tuesday, November 22, 2011 7:17 PM
    Tuesday, November 22, 2011 7:17 PM
  • You are the man!  That was my issue too...I was thinking too complicated when it turned out to be just that simple!  Have a good one!
    Wednesday, March 21, 2012 8:58 PM
  • Well i had the same problem and this is what i did

    enter your bios setup and make sure the harddrive u want to install windows 7 on is set as primary harddrive

    that is the only way you can install it if not you will get the error

    this simple thing helped me and i hope it can help you too

    Friday, August 23, 2013 3:43 PM
  • Steve,

    Mate, You are a legend. I was trying to install windows 8 to an SSD, using UEFI mode and it wouldn't let me install and threw me that error. I toiled over it for days and randomly came across this thread, saw your post and it worked first time. Thank-you so much!

    Absolute bloody legend!

    Saturday, November 02, 2013 12:00 AM
  • After banging my head against the table like Steve Balmer a few times, I realised that 0x80300024 was a straight forward problem, if only it had been a little more clear than a hex code huh.  I went into BIOS and made the hdd I wanted to install to the first in boot priority, then it installed fine - Winning.
    OMG, that is it, it the middle of nowhere, the simple answer, the first thing to know if not the only.  Either I am losing my googling skills, or it is the needle in a haystack of complex mingled tech issues and discussions quite unrelated to that simple cause for 0x80300024
    Friday, January 31, 2014 8:41 AM
  • This worked for me. Thank you.

    Please note that I am using Windows 8.1

    Monday, June 16, 2014 9:36 PM