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Windows 8 - Manage Wireless Networks?

    Question

  • Where is the Control Panel in Windows 8 for Manage Wireless Networks? I want to work with my wireless profiles.

    Thanks

    Friday, November 02, 2012 3:58 PM

Answers

  • Open a run box window (or press win+R) then type cmd to open Windows 8 CLI.

    To see stored wireless profiles, type:

       netsh wlan show profiles

    This will show a list of saved profiles of your connected WLAN devices. Then you'll need to write/save/memorize the profile name that you want to change.

    To see the stored key (WPA/WEP/etc) of a specific profile:

       netsh wlan show profiles name=[profile name] key=clear

    You'll find the key content under security settings.

    To delete a stored profile:

       netsh wlan delete profile name=[profile name]

    This will delete the stored profile of every WLAN interface. If you want to delete the profile of a specific WLAN interface, you need to use the following:

       netsh wlan delete profile name=[profile name] interface=[interface name]

    This is a good alternative to perform the common actions for "Manage Wireless Network" avoiding to use third party software under Windows 8.

    Hope this can come in handy!

    Tuesday, November 13, 2012 12:51 AM

All replies

  • This is removed. Try this tool:

    http://www.thewindowsclub.com/wifi-profile-manager-windows-8


    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code"

    Friday, November 02, 2012 7:40 PM
  • Open a run box window (or press win+R) then type cmd to open Windows 8 CLI.

    To see stored wireless profiles, type:

       netsh wlan show profiles

    This will show a list of saved profiles of your connected WLAN devices. Then you'll need to write/save/memorize the profile name that you want to change.

    To see the stored key (WPA/WEP/etc) of a specific profile:

       netsh wlan show profiles name=[profile name] key=clear

    You'll find the key content under security settings.

    To delete a stored profile:

       netsh wlan delete profile name=[profile name]

    This will delete the stored profile of every WLAN interface. If you want to delete the profile of a specific WLAN interface, you need to use the following:

       netsh wlan delete profile name=[profile name] interface=[interface name]

    This is a good alternative to perform the common actions for "Manage Wireless Network" avoiding to use third party software under Windows 8.

    Hope this can come in handy!

    Tuesday, November 13, 2012 12:51 AM
  • I am not sure if your trying to delete one because it is a red X on it because the settings don't match but if that is the case then you will want to click the network icon like normal to show the networks, then right click on the network with the X and you will get a drop down and "Forget This Network" is one of the options.
    Monday, January 07, 2013 6:21 AM
  • What a improvement from windows 7!?!?!
    • Proposed as answer by fkatsumi Monday, January 20, 2014 1:39 PM
    Tuesday, January 08, 2013 12:17 AM
  • Why would they remove this...
    Monday, January 14, 2013 10:05 PM
  • You have got to be kidding me....

    Are you trying to force the world NOT to use your operating system?  Why do you continually bury functionality commonly used in business under this kind of obfuscation?

    Tuesday, February 12, 2013 8:53 PM
  • Worst thing I seen in windows 8, an absolutely stupid removal.

    Hi, I like clean computers :-p

    Tuesday, February 19, 2013 8:03 PM
  • it is not gone,IN WINDOWS 8
    • Access Settings and then choose the Wireless icon.
    • Right-click on the network and choose Forget this Network.
    Saturday, March 02, 2013 3:36 PM
  • I had network named "AP" - without security settings, only for some minutes for testing.

    Then I set network security on router and tried to find this network again.

    Yes I found it, but Windows 8 renamed it to AP2. And no GUI option to forget older "AP" network was available - was not visible.

    Yes, my fault, I should first on my notebook and others "forget older AP" first  :D.

    IT IS CRAZY :)

     


    Jiri Cvrk

    Monday, March 04, 2013 4:24 PM
  • it is not gone,IN WINDOWS 8
    • Access Settings and then choose the Wireless icon.
    • Right-click on the network and choose Forget this Network.
    This statement is 100% not accurate. I ran into a similar problem demonstrating my new surface pro to an associate. A network setting was miss-typed, still not used to the SP's tiny keyboard, and there was no GUI option to remove it. Every attempt to redo the non broadcasting SSID stated it was already configured. Since it was not connected or visible by Windows 8, the connection was not displayed via that wireless icon. The only method I've found since was the CLI provided by Raúl Castillo earlier in this thread. Now, it's now completely deleted and I was able to connect to it without issues. If I had such a difficult time resolving this problem, I can only imagine the problems a non-technical user would have trouble shooting this problem. 
    Thursday, March 07, 2013 7:23 PM
  • The management of wireless networks in Windows 8 is accessed via the "Charms" bar. You get to it by hovering over the right-hand lower left area of the screen (I usually swirl my "mouse" around in the area and it pops up, or via ctrl+c it will pop up. Select Settings, then, you will see two rows of icons on the bottom of the settings app (I do anyway). The first icon (top left) is what you want, the icon looks like signal bars with the name of the connection under (for me anyway). Select this icon and you will be presented with your network profiles.

    If you have wifi, it will show any available networks and any profiled hidden networks you've configured. Right-click on the connection or profile of interest and you'll be presented with a context menu; among the list of options is Forget this Network (profiled connections only). 

    Hope this helps, I had to seek this out because I have two wifi-nodes, one publicly visible but locked, and one hidden (non broadcasting SSID) and locked; I wanted to switch connections but it isn't an option from the control panel...not sure why not, but at least it is not actually removed, just moved. As I do most of my computing from the desktop, your mileage may vary if using a non-PC device.

    --(Darkstrumn : 130310.23


    Hack and the world hacks with you!

    • Proposed as answer by Darkstrumn Monday, March 11, 2013 6:34 AM
    Monday, March 11, 2013 6:33 AM
  • Hi, on my tablet when I right-click on the connection or profile of interest thee is no context menu (nothing's happening), do you know why guys?
    Monday, March 11, 2013 9:45 AM
  • First it only allows to forget, not to reorder priority of the network.

    Second, some networks cannot be forgotten, in particular those I have no access to (neighbour's wifi) cannot be forgotten. So many useful things have been removed that I wonder who has created Windows 8, certainly not people who do any work.
    No ad hoc access points that my android phone may set?
    Calculators or other "modern" applications that covers all 30" of my screen?
    What is the advantage of Windows 8? I really consider going back to Windows 7.

    Tuesday, March 12, 2013 6:53 PM
  • Dude!! You're scaring people unnecesarilly with script - It is NOT gone and can easily be done through the UI!

    bests!

    Sunday, April 07, 2013 6:27 PM
  • Unfortunately many of you are FAILING to understand the issue. More than that, very few of you actually understand what this, now removed, tool actually does. Many people who work in large business complexes that have very complicated networks or universities with enterprise level security NEED this function just to simply CONNECT to the wifi. Without the profiles and ability to edit the profiles, there is literally NO WAY to connect. STOP saying that "its not gone, you can remove the networks" No one important actually cares about removing the invisible network from their even more invisible list of network profiles. Instead, this thread was started because of real  issues.

    Now, is there anything better than that broken tool posted above?

    • Edited by R33F3R Friday, April 12, 2013 12:03 AM
    Friday, April 12, 2013 12:01 AM
  • Did you find the answer?  I am able to edit my profiles without difficulty.
    Wednesday, April 17, 2013 12:57 PM
  • While technically correct, the UI does offer ways to do all of the above.
    Wednesday, April 17, 2013 1:00 PM
  • I think you haven't understood the question which refers to memorized previous connections. All your solution does is show networks in range of where you are
    Wednesday, April 24, 2013 1:14 AM
  • Unfortunately many of you are FAILING to understand the issue. More than that, very few of you actually understand what this, now removed, tool actually does. Many people who work in large business complexes that have very complicated networks or universities with enterprise level security NEED this function just to simply CONNECT to the wifi. Without the profiles and ability to edit the profiles, there is literally NO WAY to connect. STOP saying that "its not gone, you can remove the networks" No one important actually cares about removing the invisible network from their even more invisible list of network profiles. Instead, this thread was started because of real  issues.

    Now, is there anything better than that broken tool posted above?


    Yes, this is correct. Enterprise security settings are not saved properly by creating a new wireless network connection. My attempt to create one saved the security as WPA2 instead of WPA2-Enterprise which will not work. Microsoft needs to realize that removing the wireless profile manage was a blunder and reinstate it.
    • Proposed as answer by steve_web Friday, September 27, 2013 4:26 AM
    Wednesday, May 01, 2013 4:00 PM
  • Open a run box window (or press win+R) then type cmd to open Windows 8 CLI.

    To see stored wireless profiles, type:

       netsh wlan show profiles

    This will show a list of saved profiles of your connected WLAN devices. Then you'll need to write/save/memorize the profile name that you want to change.

    To see the stored key (WPA/WEP/etc) of a specific profile:

       netsh wlan show profiles name=[profile name] key=clear

    You'll find the key content under security settings.

    To delete a stored profile:

       netsh wlan delete profile name=[profile name]

    This will delete the stored profile of every WLAN interface. If you want to delete the profile of a specific WLAN interface, you need to use the following:

       netsh wlan delete profile name=[profile name] interface=[interface name]

    This is a good alternative to perform the common actions for "Manage Wireless Network" avoiding to use third party software under Windows 8.

    Hope this can come in handy!

    Good start.

    To set priorities, use:

    netsh wlan set profileorder name="network_name" interface="interface_name" priority=1

    Where the network name is the name of the wireless network, the interface name is the name of the adapter (you can find this through netsh wlan show profiles), and the priority is the order in the list (note that when you set priority=1 you "push" the current first priority network down to #2).

    There are also other functions through netsh wlan, just type netsh wlan /? to see them all.

    • Proposed as answer by Albert Xing Thursday, May 09, 2013 11:03 PM
    Thursday, May 09, 2013 11:03 PM
  • Ok, its WINDOW-C , not CTL-C

    and i do not get any context menu when I mouse over a profile in the list. or right click , or anything else i have tried. 

    This IS the place anybody w/ any intent on providing useful software would have put the context menu. 

    Maybe its a permission thing? Maybe you have to turn Account control off? Just thinking outloud...

    Friday, May 31, 2013 8:03 PM
  • Cannot BELIEVE I had to use command line options -- I'm a dos freak, but NOT for wifi... WTF?  So, I set up a hidden network and forget to check the 'connect even if not broadcasting option'... so the network wasn't connecting and wouldn't show up in list... so I can't say 'forget network' or get to the settings.  Going to re-add the network is NOT an option because the name is specific and windows complains that the network already exists (no @#$@ Sherlock) and won't let me overwrite only add new one with different name.

    I usually defend Windows 8 as, for the most part, once you find out how you can do everything you did in Windows 7 with some tablet crap available too... but the decision to remove this is HORRID.  HOOORRRIIID.  Hopefully they put this back in a future patch -- it's arguably a bug 2/2 oversight.  Not much justification otherwise.

    Wednesday, June 26, 2013 3:10 PM
  • it is not gone,IN WINDOWS 8

    • Access Settings and then choose the Wireless icon.
    • Right-click on the network and choose Forget this Network.

    This statement is 100% not accurate. I ran into a similar problem demonstrating my new surface pro to an associate. A network setting was miss-typed, still not used to the SP's tiny keyboard, and there was no GUI option to remove it. Every attempt to redo the non broadcasting SSID stated it was already configured. Since it was not connected or visible by Windows 8, the connection was not displayed via that wireless icon. The only method I've found since was the CLI provided by Raúl Castillo earlier in this thread. Now, it's now completely deleted and I was able to connect to it without issues. If I had such a difficult time resolving this problem, I can only imagine the problems a non-technical user would have trouble shooting this problem. 

    moyarich is right. If the stored wireless network settings do not match the current settings and the red "x" appears on the wireless network, you can right-click it (or however you do that on a touch screen...long-press?) and tell it to forget the network. That still means you have no GUI method to remove networks that aren't currently in-range. Apple iOS devices (iPad, iPhone, iPod touch) also don't have a way to "forget network" when you're not in-range. However, when stored settings mismatch, iOS devices will automatically recognize this and replace the stored settings with the updated settings. The fact that Windows doesn't do this is not user-friendly and drives me insane because I have to provide support to people who can't figure it out. This is not new with Windows 8. I help Windows 7 users every day when they get the message that the stored settings do not match. At least it's slightly easier in Windows 8 to find "forget network," but your average user still doesn't even attempt to right-click anything.

    Thursday, June 27, 2013 8:04 PM
  • Cannot BELIEVE I had to use command line options -- I'm a dos freak, but NOT for wifi... WTF?  So, I set up a hidden network and forget to check the 'connect even if not broadcasting option'... so the network wasn't connecting and wouldn't show up in list... so I can't say 'forget network' or get to the settings.  Going to re-add the network is NOT an option because the name is specific and windows complains that the network already exists (no @#$@ Sherlock) and won't let me overwrite only add new one with different name.

    I usually defend Windows 8 as, for the most part, once you find out how you can do everything you did in Windows 7 with some tablet crap available too... but the decision to remove this is HORRID.  HOOORRRIIID.  Hopefully they put this back in a future patch -- it's arguably a bug 2/2 oversight.  Not much justification otherwise.

    You nailed it.
    Thursday, June 27, 2013 8:07 PM
  •  it Microsoft, what the hell. Whenever you do crap like this the image of Ballmer running around on stage screaming like a sweaty idiot comes to mind and I ask myself: Why am i so patient with you? Linux is looking better and better by the day.

    Furthermore, how about USER SPECIFIC abilities that were possible before. How do I do that? What's the twenty step command line procedure for that?


    Saturday, June 29, 2013 7:48 PM
  • Unfortunately many of you are FAILING to understand the issue. More than that, very few of you actually understand what this, now removed, tool actually does. Many people who work in large business complexes that have very complicated networks or universities with enterprise level security NEED this function just to simply CONNECT to the wifi. Without the profiles and ability to edit the profiles, there is literally NO WAY to connect. STOP saying that "its not gone, you can remove the networks" No one important actually cares about removing the invisible network from their even more invisible list of network profiles. Instead, this thread was started because of real  issues.

    Now, is there anything better than that broken tool posted above?

    It is a fact that the former 'Manage Wireless Networks' has been removed, but the components to configure a wireless network are still there, just in a different place. If you go to the Charms Bar, and then to the wireless networks, one can right-click (long-tap) any wireless network within range. At this point there are several options. Among them are 'Forgot This Network' and 'View Connection Properties.'  Under 'View Connection Properties' you should find most all of the settings you will need to configure an Enterprise level Wifi network, I know I have. Hope this helps.

    --

    Tyler W

    Monday, July 01, 2013 12:34 AM
  • After you have made the initial connection, go to the Charms Bar > your wireless networks, and right-click (long-tap) the intended wireless access point and choose 'View Connection Properties.'  You will be able to edit all of the Enterprise level properties from there.
    Monday, July 01, 2013 12:39 AM
  • Tyler, you don't have the facts right and you are missing the point of this whole thread.  Your instructions ONLY work if the wireless network is in range.  What about the wireless network I had out of state at the Hyatt, or the one at the airport in Iowa that I may never use again?  There is no way to delete them......ONLY way is the Command Prompt netsh method mentioned above.  I don't know why some of you won't just admit this is a big flaw and quit trying to tell the rest of us we can just right click on it.  No you can't!
    Monday, July 01, 2013 2:37 AM
  • Hello.

    I found another way to do this. Don't know if it what you are looking for. In network and sharing centre, click (touch I am on tablet) set up a new connection or network. Then click on  Manually connect to a wireless network. You can then enter the details manually, including all enterprise security settings like you used to Windows 7. I don't know if this has any issues with saving settings etc or all the stuff mentioned above, but it is working and saving enterprise settings for my Win 8 RT tablet on my workplace wifi network. I didn't have to go anywhere near the charms bar apart from to start control panel.

    Si

    Monday, July 01, 2013 2:14 PM
  • Open a run box window (or press win+R) then type cmd to open Windows 8 CLI.

    To see stored wireless profiles, type:

       netsh wlan show profiles

    This will show a list of saved profiles of your connected WLAN devices. Then you'll need to write/save/memorize the profile name that you want to change.

    To see the stored key (WPA/WEP/etc) of a specific profile:

       netsh wlan show profiles name=[profile name] key=clear

    You'll find the key content under security settings.

    To delete a stored profile:

       netsh wlan delete profile name=[profile name]

    This will delete the stored profile of every WLAN interface. If you want to delete the profile of a specific WLAN interface, you need to use the following:

       netsh wlan delete profile name=[profile name] interface=[interface name]

    This is a good alternative to perform the common actions for "Manage Wireless Network" avoiding to use third party software under Windows 8.

    Hope this can come in handy!

    Ok, this works great for wireless networks. How about wired Ethernet connections I have made. I have many of them too, Network 1, 2, 3, 4, etc and it keeps adding anytime I plug in. How can I get rid of all of these?
    Monday, July 01, 2013 8:57 PM
  • I think people on this thread need to reread the posts by Davidoo, R33F3R, and VictorTWilcox.  The problem many are having is NOT that they cannot figure out how to delete a network that they are in range of.  It's that they need to:

    1. Set the ORDER of priority of those networks they occasionally use and do NOT wish to delete.  For example office buildings that have multiple networks, many of which the user's laptop will pass through, but not all of which will provide the best signal and/or bandwidth at all times.  In such a case, PRIORITY and "default network" become the essential issues, not how to "forget" a network that you don't need today but certainly will need again next week.  The headache here is that Win8 is choosing to unthinkingly connect to the last network that was added, rather than choosing better networks that only the user will know and understand fully.

    2. Delete totally, or modify settings/priority, of networks "not in range," which therefore do not appear in the Win8 connection list precisely BECAUSE they are "not in range."  For example, Davidoo's "Hyatt hotel" network -- a rarely used and presently inaccessible network.

    3. Set up access to complex networks that have enterprise security or other special requirements.  Face it folks, not all networks are named "home" with dead-simple connection procedures and less than 10 users.  The essential issue here is that Win8 is saving network logon info but not allowing access to it, at least not without umpteen command line headaches. 

    Win8 has created a nightmare by taking away this utility and I will be finding an aftermarket solution just like I did for the missing Start button.

    Wednesday, July 03, 2013 8:56 PM
  • Ok, this works great for wireless networks. How about wired Ethernet connections I have made. I have many of them too, Network 1, 2, 3, 4, etc and it keeps adding anytime I plug in. How can I get rid of all of these?

    I can't test this out at the moment, but you might try netsh lan show profiles.

    • Edited by Andrew Barton Thursday, July 04, 2013 8:33 AM added quote
    Thursday, July 04, 2013 8:32 AM
  • Thanks Andrew, that is the logical path to try (taking out the w and just making it lan instead of wlan).  I tried that and it did not work. 
    Thursday, July 04, 2013 3:42 PM
  • Unfortunately the Wireless Network Connection Manager has been removed. Instead of using Third-Party tools you can also try to use your driver's integrated solution (if there is one). Drivers for Intel Adapters usually ship with a "WIFI Connection Utility" that lets you manage all your WLAN settings. Unfortunately I don't know if there's a tool for different vendors.
    Friday, July 12, 2013 8:54 PM
  • I think people on this thread need to reread the posts by Davidoo, R33F3R, and VictorTWilcox.  The problem many are having is NOT that they cannot figure out how to delete a network that they are in range of.  It's that they need to:

    1. Set the ORDER of priority of those networks they occasionally use and do NOT wish to delete.  For example office buildings that have multiple networks, many of which the user's laptop will pass through, but not all of which will provide the best signal and/or bandwidth at all times.  In such a case, PRIORITY and "default network" become the essential issues, not how to "forget" a network that you don't need today but certainly will need again next week.  The headache here is that Win8 is choosing to unthinkingly connect to the last network that was added, rather than choosing better networks that only the user will know and understand fully.

    2. Delete totally, or modify settings/priority, of networks "not in range," which therefore do not appear in the Win8 connection list precisely BECAUSE they are "not in range."  For example, Davidoo's "Hyatt hotel" network -- a rarely used and presently inaccessible network.

    3. Set up access to complex networks that have enterprise security or other special requirements.  Face it folks, not all networks are named "home" with dead-simple connection procedures and less than 10 users.  The essential issue here is that Win8 is saving network logon info but not allowing access to it, at least not without umpteen command line headaches. 

    Win8 has created a nightmare by taking away this utility and I will be finding an aftermarket solution just like I did for the missing Start button.


    I agree completely. It was a HUGE mistake to remove this feature. I have found this little program and will be using it on all my W8 wireless computers. WiFi Profile Manager It's a real shame, how many 3rd-party programs I have to install on all my W8 computers just to force them to work properly.........
    Sunday, July 14, 2013 1:53 AM
  • I've been a systems engineer for 15 years and the disconnect between Microsoft and it's consumer customer base seems to be at an all time high. Look. I understand about command lines and third party apps. But I don't want to have to do that to simply manage my available wireless connections. It's a regular function of computing. More so now than ever. So they remove it???

    I'm on Windows 8.1. You know the one where they sort-of put back the bloody start button. And right clicking on the, what's it called, charm, does nothing. I've spent over an hour trying to figure out how to 'forget' a wireless connection. That's just unacceptable. 




    Sunday, July 14, 2013 2:40 PM
  • Even if you delete all the existing profiles using netsh, I still see the dreaded " 2" added added to the network name in Network and Sharing Center when you connect to the wireless network again. 

    Let me just give you a quick example to illustrate this: When you change the security settings for a wireless network "MYWLAN", and then use the "Forget this network" feature to connect to the same WLAN with its new settings, you will see the network as "MYWLAN 2" in Network and sharing Center. There's no way to change this new automatically named entry, even if you use "netsh wlan show profiles".

    Trust me: This is extremely confusing and annoying for final users. Some even suspect there's a hacker messing around with their home-based network. What would you tell them? "Hey, don't worry, it's just the way things are now under Windows 8. Get over it and move on!" Well, I tried. And you don't want to know the answer I got. Not to mention how scared I was by the way some reacted when I suggested to use the CLI to manage their network profiles!

    Any other suggestion?

    Friday, August 02, 2013 11:05 AM
  • Really?  How do I prioritize my WiFi networks if I am in an area with more than 1 available networks for fail over situation but I want to connect to 1 particular network unless it drops the connection?

    In Windows 7 I can order the WiFi profiles in order of preference.  How do I do this in Windows 8?

    Carl

    Friday, August 02, 2013 5:01 PM
  • You expect the average user to know and start using Command line interface?

    lol

    Friday, August 02, 2013 5:03 PM
  • Repeating the same useless drivel everyone above already said.

    Still missing the UI that will allow prioritizing WiFi networks easily without CLI.

    Friday, August 02, 2013 5:07 PM

  • I agree completely. It was a HUGE mistake to remove this feature. I have found this little program and will be using it on all my W8 wireless computers. WiFi Profile Manager It's a real shame, how many 3rd-party programs I have to install on all my W8 computers just to force them to work properly.........

    Thank you.  At least someone thought to attempt to repair Microsoft's latest blunder.

    Carl.

    Friday, August 02, 2013 5:14 PM
  • Yes, it IS gone and no, he is not scaring people unnecessarily.

    The Windows team has screwed up by removing a ton of tools that were extremely useful and either replacing them with new tools that are only logical or useful on a tablet (e.g. the start button) or - even worse - with no tools other than command lines (such is the case for the wifi networks manager).

    What you can do through the GUI on the "annoying" charm bar is only a fraction of what you could do in Win 7 with the Wifi manager tool (2 huge things missing are access to wifi networks not currently broadcasting and prioritizing networks...)

    Friday, August 02, 2013 7:02 PM
  • I actually cannot believe they have removed this extremely useful functionality from the GUI.

    Some of the best features for me in W7 were the advances in management of wireless networks compared to XP.  Now they've made it more difficult again. Idiotic.

    Monday, August 05, 2013 2:03 PM
  • Now, removing the ability to manage the wireless networks fro the GUI, Android or iOS has better contorl over the wireless networks than Windows 8 Pro. Now, when wireless networks are the major way to connect systems, and most portable systems are removing the wired networking (i.e. Surface Pro). Microsoft has made a big weakness on his OS. I Sincerely hope they reconsider it and, in the final version they actually provide Windows 8.1 the ability to manage the wireless network properly.
    Wednesday, August 07, 2013 1:50 PM
  • With CMD window delete all WLAN connections with this line:

    netsh wlan delete profile name=* i=*

    Then just add them back in.  We the help of the page below I'm thinking I should just create a WSH for it. What were these Microsoft people thinking when they created this metro monster...ah they were not thinking!

    Sunday, August 11, 2013 9:31 AM
  • With CMD window delete all WLAN connections with this line:

    netsh wlan delete profile name=* i=*

    Then just add them back in.  We the help of the page below I'm thinking I should just create a WSH for it. What were these Microsoft people thinking when they created this metro monster...ah they were not thinking!


    MartinMe1: What you're proposing is exactly the problem I raised a couple of days ago in this thread: The vast majority of people do not feel comfortable at all working with the command line. It is just not aceptable to even mention the CLI to manage wireless networks. Come on! There must be a way to provide a GUI in Windows 8 to manage wireless networks just like in Windows 7.
    Sunday, August 11, 2013 4:18 PM
  • I'm a confident pc user but use cli for wifi settings?? Early days of linux maybe but not even there now. I've had my win8 for 2 weeks now and these have been the most horrendous weeks of my pc life with dreadful problems getting (and still failing btw) to get reliable file sharing over my home wireless network comprising 2  winxp desktops and one xp laptop in addition to the problem child, the new win8 laptop. I have completely disabled the UAC and set permissions and sharing as open as i can and tried every trick i can find on the web to make myshares as simple as they were pre-win8. A return to XP despite the effort of formatting and reloading etc seems like the only option. I don't want too much, just to be able to share files (not just those win8 thinks i ought to put in the users area, pics etc) over my wifi network.  Picking up on a point raised above, i am even in trouble getting a wired ethernet network to allow file sharing. Win8 ?? !@#$%
    Thursday, August 15, 2013 12:53 PM
  • Seriously whoever made this decision does NOT do IT for a living.

    Tyler Kepple Verde Valley Tech Support - AAS Computing Systems and Applications - A+ Certified

    Thursday, August 15, 2013 6:26 PM
  • This thread is crazy, I just bought a new laptop with windows-8 and I was to use this laptop at work.

    What a nightmare to modify the WIFI configuration of hidden SSID.

    MS you've made the interface so simple that it's just impossible to use it except maybe if I was to connect at a Starbucks, great.

    Lost half a day, super.

    Netsh to delete profiles, seriously ... Why can't we use intel proset connection manager or any decent windows connection manager.

    Tuesday, August 20, 2013 12:12 AM
  • Once again, someone has completely missed the problem: this only works if WIRELESS NETWORKS ARE IN RANGE as you have even stated Tyler. Can't people understand this!?!?
    Thursday, August 29, 2013 7:04 PM
  • Mmm it's true the feature is still there in 8.0, however it only works for profiles in range.  I travel a lot and so there are necessarily lots of old connected profiles that do not appear in the list (not in range) therefore these can't be edited in the way you suggest.  It seems a command line option is the only way to manage these. In 8.1 Version 6.3.9431 Build 9431 even this limited functionality is removed, nothing happens when you right click on a Wireless Icon.
     
    Saturday, September 07, 2013 5:17 AM
  • I came across this thread tonight searching for a simple solution to manage my wireless profiles. A very basic task that I have been doing since Windows 2000 802.11B, except with that OS I used a 3rd party piece of software.  Having trying to avoid Windows 8 because I see a major lack of IT professional tools be ripped out. I don't mean moved to a charms bar, but actual GUI tools gone. Managing the wireless network profiles seems quite basic, except yet again Microsoft has taken a nice simple tool as part of the OS, removed it, and instead would like end users to drop to a command prompt and execute NETSH commands.

    Seriously Microsoft, have you ever attempted to do remote support on a phone call and not able to remote into your customers PC? Try having a phone call with 70 year old and telling them to drop to a command prompt and type in NETSH etc.... Seriously?  I think the team at Microsoft who developed Windows 8 took no thought into the real world. I can see the sign on their white boards, simply the OS and hide everything you can, if you can't, remove it and make it only accessible via command prompt or PowerShell, or via a registry editor.

    I am a Microsoft Gold partner for several years now. Windows 8 has got to be one of the worse OS's ever released, sitting right next to Windows ME. No it is not worse because of stability, it is the entire UI and removal of features. Not to get off topic here, but remember how cool it was in Windows 7 that you could click the start bar and in the search type in a name, or subject and not only would the nice search service look at the index of the HDD, but also had the entire Outlook indexed, showing you that email in seconds. Try that in Windows 8, and wait a second, it doesn't search Outlook anymore? Seriously Microsoft.

    I guess for now I will revert back to Intel's Proset software, except it doesn't work like it use to, to manage the order of Wireless networks for example. In fact Intel removed that because of pressure from Microsoft to want Windows to manage those.... Intel should have not listened to Microsoft.


    Lyle Epstein
    Kortek Solutions
    http://www.korteksolutions.com

    Saturday, September 07, 2013 8:51 AM
  • OK this is absolutely infuriating!!!!!! I'm an IT pro and I can't figure out how to "forget" a wireless network that for whatever reason isn't working on my Windows 8 device.

    The Wireless N network is:

    * In range,

    * WPA2

    Which means that there is NO FLIPPING RIGHT CLICK MENU when you hover over, right click on, shift click on, ctrl click on, double click on, dual click on the darn network!!!!

    There is no profile stored so attempting the command line action is useless because it doesn't show up in the list!!!

    This is a major bug as many people above have noted yet Microsoft has not posted a single response on this thread to provide a solution or indicate that this might actually be fixed in 8.1.

    Currently my Windows 8 device in range of my current network is absolutely useless even though every other (I have about 17 devices) can connect without issue, and they can all FORGET the network with a GUI interface that ALWAYS shows up under ANY condition.

    I'm sorry Microsoft but on this one, this time, you absolutely ****ed up.

    Friday, September 27, 2013 4:36 AM
  • Exact same situation here! Every now and then, I seem to bumping into more and more features missing from Windows 8 on my Surface Pro (unfortunately I have yet to find reliable Windows 7 drivers for this awesome hardware). One of such features is the ability to easily merge/rename/delete network locations.

    I connect to a wide variety of WiFi networks with my Surface Pro, from home to university to work (and once in a while to the nearby Timmies). Due to this, I have a higher probability of having duplicate SSIDs in my network connections list, this result in Windows adding an incremental number in front of the SSID, which is noticed in the tooltip of the Network notification area icon.

    In Windows 7, we had the ability to remove these duplicates, thanks to the "Customize Network" GUI. For whatever stupid reason, Microsoft dumped this GUI from Windows 8. So, I'm now looking for a way to manage these, any suggestions? Or Microsoft that desperate to share network connection history with the NSA (for whatever nonsense "security" reasons) that they've totally done away with the ability to delete these?

    BTW, I'm not talking about the network list that shows up when you run the "netsh wlan show profile" command. I'm talking about the list that shows up when say you're creating a scheduled task with a network connection condition, like in the following screen clip:

    Static From MrElectrifyer


    Saturday, September 28, 2013 1:55 AM
  • Open a run box window (or press win+R) then type cmd to open Windows 8 CLI.

    To see stored wireless profiles, type:

       netsh wlan show profiles

    This will show a list of saved profiles of your connected WLAN devices. Then you'll need to write/save/memorize the profile name that you want to change.

    To see the stored key (WPA/WEP/etc) of a specific profile:

       netsh wlan show profiles name=[profile name] key=clear

    You'll find the key content under security settings.

    To delete a stored profile:

       netsh wlan delete profile name=[profile name]

    This will delete the stored profile of every WLAN interface. If you want to delete the profile of a specific WLAN interface, you need to use the following:

       netsh wlan delete profile name=[profile name] interface=[interface name]

    This is a good alternative to perform the common actions for "Manage Wireless Network" avoiding to use third party software under Windows 8.

    Hope this can come in handy!

    This is a solution for advanced users and IT Professionals. Now we need a user-friendly GUI-based solution for the average user, which is what most of us are waiting for since this thread was started. I don't agree on marking Raúl's post as an answer. Do we really want to give up and ask today's average user to use a CLI to manage wireless networks? Or, do we want Microsoft to understand and comply with our expectations to restore the features offered by the GUI-based solution that was already available in Windows 7?

    Saturday, September 28, 2013 2:16 PM
  • Totally agree, last week I called Mictosoft tech support and told them about this, suggesting the message gets passed to Ballmer. No hope of it getting done, but still better than nothing…the more people call them and complain about this, the more likely they're going to listen.

    Static From MrElectrifyer

    Tuesday, October 01, 2013 7:47 AM
  • OK, now they've made it worse in Windows 8.1  The manageability from the Modern UI side bar is gone.  AND, they now store the profiles in your cloud storage under your Microsoft account.   As I've been playing with the prerelease over the past 2 months, I've now found that I've got about 30 of the same SSID stored in my information.  Each subsequent one has a number after it.  Such as "router", then "router 2" then "router 2 3" then "router 2 3 4" etc etc.  If I delete any one of them locally with the nice little tool from The Windows Club, it will eventually show back up.  And all of them showed up on a fresh installation of Windows 8.1 release that I just installed on a laptop.  I don't know how to delete these cloud based profiles.  Can anyone help?

    Sunday, October 06, 2013 1:23 AM
  • Hahahaha, just as I anticipated, fukn Microsoft has made Windows 8.1 more NSA friendly.

    Now I have even more reasons to stay away from 8.1; b4 it was just due to them disposing of the Windows Image backup GUI. I heard they replaced it with a NSA SkyDrive backup tool...keep shooting yourself in the foot Microsoft.


    Static From MrElectrifyer



    Wednesday, October 09, 2013 1:52 AM
  • Many posts may have been answered: To remove all WiFi profiles in one go use fuzzy matching -

    Warning: If you have forgotten your wireless password do not proceed!!

    netsh wlan delete profile name=*

    Then proceed to fill up the list again :-)

    ====================================

    Step by step:

    Windows 8 start menu

    Right click desktop and choose All apps

    Under Window System right click Command Prompt and choose Run as administrator

    Confirm by clicking Yes

    Type: netsh wlan delete profile name=*

    Press <ENTER>

    This will disconnect the current wireless session, so re-connect and enter your password.

    Cheers



    Friday, October 11, 2013 6:40 PM
  • Thanks Barry but there's still 3 major issues that are not being addressed.

    1.) Having to run a "Command Line Tool" to "forget" a network is not acceptable in 2013.

    2.) The Metro right panel overlay that pops up from the charms bar does not have the "long-touch" menu to "forget" networks that it ***CAN*** find.  When you have an issue with a network it doesn't matter what the reason is, or whether the OS can find it... Just simply provide the option to forget ***ANY*** wireless network!

    3.) The Command Line tool only lets you delete profiles that are "active" (or whatever the term is that they use) which means if you are trying to "forget" a network that isn't active... because IT ISN'T F#$@#$%(@! WORKING... then you can't forget it!

    In all previous versions of Windows (or any 3rd party wireless GUI (e.g. Lenovo)) you can FORGET ANY NETWORK (regardless of its state)!

    This is what we all want and need. Nothing less.

    For anyone else jumping on this thread to indicate the problem is solvable with the current scenario please re-read the list above several times until it is painfully clear.

    There absolutely needs to be an option (a GUI option!) to delete/forget ANY wireless network, regardless of its state.  We don't care if it is up, down, fast, slow, connects to the router but not to the Internet, or streaming 10GB/s of data... WE WANT TO BE ABLE TO FORGET/DELETE ANY WIFI NETWORK!

    I'm sorry for screaming here but I've sadly learned that that is the only time that Microsoft tends to pay attention to these issues.

    Friday, October 11, 2013 9:06 PM
  • 3.) The Command Line tool only lets you delete profiles that are "active" (or whatever the term is that they use) which means if you are trying to "forget" a network that isn't active... because IT ISN'T F#$@#$%(@! WORKING... then you can't forget it!

    What do you mean active? My Windows 7 netbook had many wireless profiles from all over the country and Europe, going back years, and they were all removed by the command line. Do you mean there are more networks configured on my PC that I cannot remove? How do I find them?

    I do get your reasoning and agree there should be GUI's for this kind of thing, but I am not sure if your point 3 is entirely accurate, I am hoping to eat humble pie in this case.

    98 - good, ME -bad, XP - good, Vista -bad, 7 - good, 8 - bad

    I think 8.1 will also be bad so the pattern is broken.

    Cheers


    • Edited by Barry Morris Saturday, October 12, 2013 10:06 AM
    Saturday, October 12, 2013 10:05 AM
  • Yes, check out my post above (or this thread in particular) regarding the list that shows up in Task Scheduler. Those are historical networks that are no longer active, and attempting to delete them via the commandline only outputs an error message stating that "There is no such wireless interface on the system".

    In windows 7, you have the GUI to manage those networks; click on the network location icon in Network and Sharing Center, then click the merge/delete network locations link (can't recall what exactly it was named). A window will pop-up and show you a list of ALL SSIDs you've ever connected to and from there you can merge/delete the duplicates/historical ones. For whatever stupid reason, Microsoft disposed of this GUI (along with several others) in Windows 8.

    Regarding 8.1, that's just a service pack update with a new name, the pattern still remains unless Windows 9 is also bad.


    Static From MrElectrifyer


    • Proposed as answer by MrElectrifyer Sunday, October 13, 2013 1:45 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by MrElectrifyer Sunday, October 13, 2013 1:45 AM
    • Edited by MrElectrifyer Sunday, October 13, 2013 1:47 AM Regarding 8.1
    Sunday, October 13, 2013 1:45 AM
  • That is the exact same stuff that has already been offered here. As stated by steve_web, there's still three major issues that are not being addressed by that methodology! Any NEW suggestions are welcome.


    Static From MrElectrifyer

    Wednesday, October 16, 2013 7:16 PM
  • If you just want to delete those network, you can find them in registry in

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\NetworkList\Profiles
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\NetworkList\Signatures\Unmanaged

    There is also HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\NetworkList\Nla\Cache but I don't fully understand if this can be messed with

    • Proposed as answer by MrElectrifyer Saturday, October 26, 2013 2:51 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by MrElectrifyer Sunday, March 09, 2014 5:10 AM
    Thursday, October 24, 2013 11:22 AM
  • it is not gone,IN WINDOWS 8
    • Access Settings and then choose the Wireless icon.
    • Right-click on the network and choose Forget this Network.
    Updated in Windows 8.1: this is not possible anymore. Microsoft continues to dificult thigs to users...
    Thursday, October 24, 2013 4:16 PM
  • Weel, all those forum entries point to the same real nuisance. Here my own contribution.
    I just migrated from 8.0 to 8.1 and could not succeed to connect yesterday downtown to a hidden SSID. Using the charm bar does NOT provide any context menu to either forget a wrong configured network profile or reconfigure it.

    Coming back home I could not even display the subject profile because the network was out of range. Of course I managed to do it with the CLI and the netsh command.

    It is already shameful for Microsoft to drop former useful GUI utillities in favor of cryptic CLI interfaces.

    Plse note that the provided third party utility, Wifi_Profile_Manager which I tried, does provide à GUI management interface but shows all network profiles as unavailable, at least unde 8.1. What a mess. 

     

    D. Ciprut

    Friday, October 25, 2013 11:07 AM
  • That sucks, but continues to satisfy my speculation of 8.1 just being a tighter relationship with the NSA, similar to OS X Mavericks (both free). Guess I'll be skipping Windows 8.1...'cause Microsoft seems to just be getting more and more stupid. Holding off until the next odd version...like Windows Se7en, 9 is being preceded by a moronic OS.

    @Kapela1 Clearing the first two registry directories seem to do the trick! Thanks for the suggestion :)


    Static From MrElectrifyer

    Friday, October 25, 2013 11:35 AM
  • Open a run box window (or press win+R) then type cmd to open Windows 8 CLI.

    To see stored wireless profiles, type:

       netsh wlan show profiles

    This will show a list of saved profiles of your connected WLAN devices. Then you'll need to write/save/memorize the profile name that you want to change.

    To see the stored key (WPA/WEP/etc) of a specific profile:

       netsh wlan show profiles name=[profile name] key=clear

    You'll find the key content under security settings.

    To delete a stored profile:

       netsh wlan delete profile name=[profile name]

    This will delete the stored profile of every WLAN interface. If you want to delete the profile of a specific WLAN interface, you need to use the following:

       netsh wlan delete profile name=[profile name] interface=[interface name]

    This is a good alternative to perform the common actions for "Manage Wireless Network" avoiding to use third party software under Windows 8.

    Hope this can come in handy!

    Hi!

    OK, thanks for this fine reply, which was very helpful for me!

    Please, following there is a completion for it with the solution for the thing I originally was searching for.

    On my newly upgraded Win8.1 laptop, for technical reasons, I  sometimes do have in use 3 different WLAN interfaces, the internal one and 2 USB connected ones.

    To recognize which is which of them I needed to get them named by their own name-identification on the Network list appearing on the left.

    First they were all named as WLAN and I did try to rename them on the Registry keys HKLM\SYSTEM\CCS\Control\Network\...\Connection, but the names were changed just on some places but not on the Network list ...

    After having this hint for netsh command, I found the right way to do the renaming in full simply with this command, one by one

    netsh interface set interface name=WLAN newname=WLAN1 (and 2 and 3)

    and then by a second round giving for each of them an indivudual name

    netsh interface set interface name=WLAN1 newname="WLAN Atheros" (and WLAN2 -> "WLAN D-Link" and WLAN3 -> "WLAN Gigabyte")

    Best regards,

    Pete V.

    Tuesday, October 29, 2013 3:31 PM
  • Can't believe we're forced into the CLI for this now... c'mon Microsoft!!
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013 4:08 PM
  • CLI to manage WiFi in Win8....

    What will MS come up with next? Maybe I can learn programming code to change the time zone, or they could make it so you have to enter your static IP info via binary....

    MS, you are retarded.  

    Serioulsy.....retarded



    Wednesday, October 30, 2013 2:46 AM
  • CLI to manage WiFi in Win8....

    What will MS come up with next? Maybe I can learn programming code to change the time zone, or they could make it so you have to enter your static IP info via binary....

    MS, you are retarded.  

    Serioulsy.....retarded



    Hi!

    OK, yes, I agree!

    It took almost 2 hours for me to get the solution above first to be found and finally tested and checked that it really works, heh-heh ... 

    Best regards,

    Pete V.

    Thursday, October 31, 2013 5:02 PM
  • @Kapela1 It appears deleting those registry keys makes does the job, however, a side-effect is that whenever I connect to those networks again, the Network notification area icon displays a tooltip with the generic SSID name "Network"…

    Static From MrElectrifyer

    Thursday, October 31, 2013 6:48 PM
  • I think I have a work-around that may help some people...please let me know if it works. Try to connect to one of your saved networks, and wait while it doesn't connect (e.g. in my case because the password has changed). Then head back to charms bar settings, and where the wi-fi icon is (in my case it had a star and said available, but obviously was not connected), I right-clicked on the icon and it gave me the option to forget the network. I presume it means the one I failed to connect to. Once that's done, I opened the networks charms bar menu again and clicked the network I wanted to join. It prompted me for the password and allowed me to join.

    Complicated, but less so than using command prompt.

    Friday, November 01, 2013 7:08 PM
  • I cannot right click on the networks

    Friday, November 01, 2013 7:15 PM
  • I cannot right click on the networks
    Friday, November 01, 2013 7:15 PM
  • No, you can't right click on the networks anymore. That feature was removed in 8.1

    If you're referring to what I posted above, don't right-click on the networks themselves, right-click on the little wifi bars at the bottom left on the main charms bar settings menu, AFTER you've tried to connect to the network and it didn't work. I'm connected now so I can't reproduce it on my device at this point -- hopefully it works for someone else and it wasn't just a random success. 

    Based on what I have stored in my device, the description above worked to connect to a network in range that had the wrong stored password. Another saved network that is not in range gave me a message that says "can't connect to network" and gave me option to forget the network. So it seems the options change depending on the situation.

    Friday, November 01, 2013 7:36 PM
  • This answer should be proof enough that removing the "Manage wireless networks" feature was a serious failure. Why would anyone who wanted to make something better, eliminate a feature that took four or five clicks to see a solution (right click wireless icon in lower right of task bar, click open network and sharing center, left click Manage wireless networks, right click wireless profile), and replace it with a DOS process?

    I almost returned my new Windows 8 laptop today because of this and many other ridiculous process regressions, and I still might return it, or smash it.  My first 48 hours with this pathetic excuse for an operating system had me alternating between thinking I was on candid camera, or wondering if someone had slipped me drugs - I couldn't believe anyone could be so stupid as to ship a worthless but expensive paperweight, or I was dying of stupidity.

    If I can't get Windows 7 machines that meet our specs next year then for the first time ever I'll seriously consider MacBooks. There is no way I can justify the thousands of hours of lost productivity if I treat them like dirt and give them Windows 8/8.1 machines.

    Sunday, November 03, 2013 4:45 AM
  • What the &*!! ?  Who was the __________ who thought removing this feature was a good idea?  Probably the same guy who figured that moving the Shut Down and Restart function to "Settings" was smart.  The ability to delete, edit, and reprioritize network profiles FROM WINDOWS and without memorizing DOS commands is a pretty basic and necessary function.  No, you cannot do all this from the right sidebar.  I had several profiles that did not show up in the sidebar.  The only way to delete them was to go to the command prompt. 

    Fix this, Microsoft.  Fix it now. 

    Monday, November 04, 2013 2:54 PM
  • I have spend a few hours reading this thread.

    I recently installed 8.1 on my laptop once I learned the start button had been replaced.

    I can connect to most wifi networks fine, but the hidden SSID i setup at work will not work with my 8.1 and it stinks of!

    I also like to re-order the priority of networks depending on where I am working.

    I am slightly concearned with the wifi profiles being stored in your 'roaming' windows live user profile.

    Clealy Microsoft where part of the NSA's 10 year cyber domination plan...................

    LETS STOP ALL THIS CLI NONSCENCE - IT WORKS BUT LETS FACE IT IF PEOPLE WHERE HAPPY FOR THAT WE WOULD BE RUNNING MS-DOS V22 BY NOW!!

    BRING BACK THIS FEATURE SO I CAN PERFORM ROUTINE OS TASKS WITHOUT GOOGLING NETSH COMMANDS YOU BUNCH OF GOONS.

    WHOEVER SIGNED OFF THE REMOVAL OF THIS FEATURE WAS CLEARLY ON APPLES PAYROLL. 


    Monday, November 04, 2013 4:35 PM
  • Thanks Raul

    While it is a pain to be going back to the command line to worked for me.

    OB

    Tuesday, November 05, 2013 7:27 AM
  • That enormous thread is all very interesting and shows that techy people just like to argue that they know how to 'get round' things that should be easy as they were there before. Non tecky people who have the misfortune to support Microsoft and buy a PC with Windows 8.1 (like me) don't need all this cody stuff we are not supposed to as we don't know what we are doing, we just want to use the dame thing !!

    Will one of you clever guys give a sensible way of deleting a network at I used to be able to do in Windows 7 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    HELP !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  I can't now even get into my home wifi  !!!!!!!

    jmum

    Friday, November 08, 2013 9:44 AM
  • OK so this non techy person is trying to resolve the problem. Using Rauls answer I can see the list of networks but the delete command cames back with 'wlan delete profilename' despite putting 'netsh' in at the front.

    What do I do now ? I am running 8.1 on an Asus tablet

    thanks

    Friday, November 08, 2013 10:07 AM
  • To bad Windows 8 doesn't have an embedded user interface Wireless management tool.

    Anyway, some additional intersting commands you can use regarding netsh wlan are:

    To delete all known wireless profiles at once:

    netsh wlan delete profile name=*

    To see all your stored SSIDs and passwords at a glance:

    netsh wlan show profile name=* key=clear | findstr /i /c:"SSID name" /c:"Key Content"


    Thursday, November 14, 2013 11:52 AM
  • For the people who can't get it going with the right click (like me) or who want to edit networks that aren't available at the moment, I wrote a command-line utility calling the Windows API to open the connection properties dialog of an existing connection.

    #ifndef UNICODE
    #define UNICODE
    #endif
    
    #include <windows.h>
    #include <wlanapi.h>
    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <wchar.h>
    #pragma comment(lib, "wlanui.lib")
    
    int wmain(int argc, wchar_t *argv[]) {
    	if (argc < 2) {
    		printf("Parameters: InterfaceGUID ProfileName\n\nInterfaces (you need the GUID field):\n");
    		system("netsh wlan show interfaces");
    		printf("\nProfile names (you need the ESSID):\n");
    		system("netsh wlan show profiles");
    		return 1;
    	}
    
    	GUID guid;
    	wchar_t guidstr[100];
    	WLAN_REASON_CODE* reasoncode = NULL;
    	swprintf(guidstr, 100, L"{%ls}", argv[1]);
    	CLSIDFromString(guidstr, &guid);
    	WlanUIEditProfile(WLAN_UI_API_VERSION, argv[2], &guid, NULL, WLConnectionPage, NULL, reasoncode);
    	return 0;
    }

    If you're not into compiling, you can download a built version here.

    So this is just for editing, if you'd like to create a new conenction, create it with dummy authentication, then edit.

    For deletion, there's netsh wlan delete profile name=ProfileName.

    Thursday, November 14, 2013 2:45 PM
  • This is completely ridiculous.

    Please fix this issue. I need to actually be able to edit wireless connection properties and just spent about about an hour looking for a way to edit them. What's worse is that this still existed in Windows 8, but I'm forced to use 8.1 now.

    Monday, November 18, 2013 12:39 PM
  • Open a run box window (or press win+R) then type cmd to open Windows 8 CLI.

    To see stored wireless profiles, type:

       netsh wlan show profiles

    This will show a list of saved profiles of your connected WLAN devices. Then you'll need to write/save/memorize the profile name that you want to change.

    To see the stored key (WPA/WEP/etc) of a specific profile:

       netsh wlan show profiles name=[profile name] key=clear

    You'll find the key content under security settings.

    To delete a stored profile:

       netsh wlan delete profile name=[profile name]

    This will delete the stored profile of every WLAN interface. If you want to delete the profile of a specific WLAN interface, you need to use the following:

       netsh wlan delete profile name=[profile name] interface=[interface name]

    This is a good alternative to perform the common actions for "Manage Wireless Network" avoiding to use third party software under Windows 8.

    Hope this can come in handy!

    Make sure to open the command prompt (cmd.exe) as admin. This will allow you to see the passwords.
    Monday, November 18, 2013 3:37 PM
  • The saddest thing is that even when there's a topic of this activity over such a core feature missing, that is actually a step back from Win 8... even then nothing happens.

    If I were a MS employee in charge, and I'd find the person who actually removed this code (or ordered it's removal), I'd have him work 48 hours a day to put it back, and go the extra mile to make it both user-friendly and expert-friendly.

    Seriously, there are many features which have been removed from the WinAPI GUI, but not yet properly added in the Modern UI. Bluetooth device browsing is still very childish under Modern UI, not to mention network file browsing in it's entirety missing...

    I did not understand what people meant by Win 8 is a beta version of an OS. Once they started implementing the core features (thus accessible from both Modern and the older UI) and got to roughly 10% of all the features, now I can see how many things are missing... how long till there will be Event-Log, Certification Manager and the likes under Modern UI...

    Honestly, I do not understand where Win 9 could be going at this rate.

    Wednesday, November 20, 2013 1:19 PM
  • Hopefully Windows 9 would be just a continuation of the current pattern; like XP and Se7en, Windows N9ne is being preceded by a terrible pubilc beta. 8.1 is just a service pack update. I suggest calling them and complaining about this AND the other power-user features you noticed were gone.

    Static From MrElectrifyer

    Wednesday, November 20, 2013 9:00 PM
  • THANK YOU!!!  All I wanted to see was whether my 3 wireless networks I push onto the tablet were actually installed or not.  Not all 3 of them are active all the time and there IS a particular order I want them to connect.

    The WiFi Profile Manager that you linked to was EXACTLY what I was looking for!


    Dave

    Friday, November 22, 2013 12:44 AM
  •  I suggest calling them and complaining about this AND the other power-user features you noticed were gone.
    Call whom? I've been trying to find a phone number or E-Mail address for feedback, but I can't find anything besides support adresses.
    Thursday, November 28, 2013 10:31 AM
  • Go to surface.com/support, login and have tech support call you.

    Static From MrElectrifyer

    Friday, November 29, 2013 2:54 PM
  • This dose not work if their is a space in the SSID

    C:\WINDOWS\system32>netsh wlan show profile name=XXXXXX XXXX key=clear
    There is no such wireless interface on the system.

    ... really?! I'm not looking for an interface but a profile... nice QA boyz!

    I'm starting to feel Vista-ish about Windows 8/8.1

    There should be two flavors of Win 8... Desktop (no Metro nonsense) and Tablet.

    Monday, December 09, 2013 10:10 PM
  • I want to remove all my old hotel Wifi profiles and also about 20 wifi connections don't even exist anymore:

    1. Using netsh only shows me the last 3 wifi networks I have connected to.

    2. Following MrElectrifyer's advice to use Regedit works and I could see about 100 connections (although no passwords are shown). However, since I am currently travelling I don't want to mess around with registry just yet and also the side-effect of re-connecting to them messing up their name is a bit worrying.


    BTW here is the OFFICIAL MICROSOFT solution for "Manage wireless network profiles" for Windows 8.1

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-IN/windows-8/manage-wireless-network-profiles    --- lol they actually tell you to use Command Prompt.



    • Edited by AmarBanwait Tuesday, December 10, 2013 7:22 PM
    Tuesday, December 10, 2013 7:19 PM
  • This dose not work if their is a space in the SSID

    C:\WINDOWS\system32>netsh wlan show profile name=XXXXXX XXXX key=clear
    There is no such wireless interface on the system.

    ... really?! I'm not looking for an interface but a profile... nice QA boyz!

    I'm starting to feel Vista-ish about Windows 8/8.1

    There should be two flavors of Win 8... Desktop (no Metro nonsense) and Tablet.

    I agree - there should be something called Windows Metro that has NOTHING to do with Windows8 at all.. What they should have done is made Windows Metro an Application inside Windows8 and given it a shortcut like Win+Alt or something. But that's it. Fking with the primary OS is stupid.

    Apart from the Mail App (Outlook 2013 totally sucks) I don't use any other Metro App at all. I've tried to, installed a couple dozen, played around with them, but there is just no use case for any of them on a business laptop (I have a touch screen too, so that's not the issue).


    • Edited by AmarBanwait Tuesday, December 10, 2013 7:28 PM
    Tuesday, December 10, 2013 7:25 PM
  • it is not gone,IN WINDOWS 8

    • Access Settings and then choose the Wireless icon.
    • Right-click on the network and choose Forget this Network.

    Updated in Windows 8.1: this is not possible anymore. Microsoft continues to dificult thigs to users...

    Yes, right-clicking does nothing in Windows 8.1, so they removed even this small ability to manage networks.

    I've read this entire thread and it is clear to me that some people are on Windows 8 whereas others are on Windows 8.1 (like me). The Windows 8 users don't understand Microsoft has changed things up again in Windows 8.1. While they brought back a "Start Button" (of sorts), they also removed right-clicking on a network to bring up a context menu.

    Microsoft's official answer here is to use the Command Line for some of these things. Wasn't the introduction of the GUI in Windows suppose to make things easier for the less tech savvy? The Command Line is for advanced users, so how can they expect everyday users to be comfortable with it? It is a retrograde step IMHO.

    So, please Microsoft, BRING BACK "MANAGE WIRELESS NETWORKS" IN THE CONTROL PANEL!!

    Wednesday, December 11, 2013 1:08 AM
  • moronic decision from a bunch of overpaid suits. Brilliant!!! Bravo!
    Monday, December 16, 2013 4:31 PM
  • Not having an option to easily delete wireless network profiles exposes non-tech savvy users to very real security threats from hackers!

    Suppose a non-tech savvy user purchases a new router and is testing it.  Many routers have a default name (SSID) such as NETGEAR or linksys, etc.  If the user clicks even just once on connect with the "connect automatically" box checked while no password is set, a profile is created that will automatically connect that computer from that time forward to any router with the same default name (SSID) that does not require a password (regardless of the MAC address: verified in Win 8.1).

    Previously, a non-tech savvy user could easily delete the wireless profiles created during testing.  Not anymore!  This is where the security risk comes into play.  In the past people would run across the old profiles and delete them.  Not anymore!  How many computers out there are just waiting to connect automatically to a router with the same default router name or hotspot name that does not require a password?  If a person dares click on "connect even if not broadcasting option" this further exasperates the problem as the computer now begins to continuously transmit probe requests saying it would like to connect to a router with a specific name.

    New readily available and inexpensive devices such as the WiFi Pineapple spoof probe requests with probe responses so that computers automatically connect to the WiFi Pineapple without the user being aware it has connected to a hacking device.  A person could literally drive around with this device and connect to many computers which are either sending out probe requests or simply to computers waiting to connect to common router/hotspot names (SSIDs) that do not require a password.

    Microsoft bring back the option to easily delete network profiles!  This is a real security risk for non-tech savvy users who will now no longer run across their old profiles to delete and will not find any way to delete profiles they may have created while testing or even which a prior owner of the computer may have created exposing the user to very real security threats and risks!



    • Edited by VLF4986 Sunday, December 29, 2013 4:18 AM
    Sunday, December 29, 2013 3:45 AM
  • I guess for now I will revert back to Intel's Proset software, except it doesn't work like it use to, to manage the order of Wireless networks for example. In fact Intel removed that because of pressure from Microsoft to want Windows to manage those.... Intel should have not listened to Microsoft.


    Lyle Epstein
    Kortek Solutions
    http://www.korteksolutions.com

    If you are on Intel chipset then Intel PROSet/Wireless is a good solution to this problem. I downloaded the latest version (16.6) and it also allows management of priority (order) of Wireless connections (in profiles section).
    Tuesday, December 31, 2013 9:53 AM
  • No right click in my Windows 8.  Nothing comes up
    Tuesday, December 31, 2013 10:56 PM
  • Jiri, go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\NetworkList\Profiles and look for your profile and delete it.  This will get rid of it adding a number at the end of th SSID
    Wednesday, January 01, 2014 3:47 AM
  • Where is the Control Panel in Windows 8 for Manage Wireless Networks? I want to work with my wireless profiles.

    Thanks

    Here's a little batch file I created to use when I am working on computers. Just copy the text below & paste it into notepad & save it as wlan removal.bat (or anything you like as long as it has bat extension). Then run it anytime you want to view or delete network profiles.

    @Echo off
    :Start
    netsh wlan show profile

    Echo (To delete all network profiles enter A)
    set /P INPUT= Enter network profile name to delete (C to cancel): %=%

    If /I %INPUT%==C goto Cancel
    If /I %INPUT%==A goto All

    netsh wlan delete profile name=%INPUT%
    set /P INPUT=Do you want to delete another profile? (Y/N): %=%

    If /I %INPUT%==Y goto Start
    If /I %INPUT%==N goto Cancel

    :Cancel
    Exit

    :All
    netsh wlan delete profile name=* i=*
    Pause
    Exit

    • Edited by cjsasl Thursday, January 02, 2014 5:04 PM
    • Proposed as answer by Wongola Saturday, April 12, 2014 2:36 AM
    Thursday, January 02, 2014 4:42 PM
  • Thanks - that was neat - except it still doesn't show all of my wifi profiles. I must have about 50 by now and it only shows 8.

    I think what someone wrote above is happening for me, it isn't showing any profiles that have a space in their name.

    Anyone else have this problem?

    Wednesday, January 08, 2014 7:26 PM
  • it is not gone,IN WINDOWS 8

    • Access Settings and then choose the Wireless icon.
    • Right-click on the network and choose Forget this Network.

    Updated in Windows 8.1: this is not possible anymore. Microsoft continues to dificult thigs to users...


    Yes, right-clicking does nothing in Windows 8.1, so they removed even this small ability to manage networks.

    I've read this entire thread and it is clear to me that some people are on Windows 8 whereas others are on Windows 8.1 (like me). The Windows 8 users don't understand Microsoft has changed things up again in Windows 8.1. While they brought back a "Start Button" (of sorts), they also removed right-clicking on a network to bring up a context menu.

    Microsoft's official answer here is to use the Command Line for some of these things. Wasn't the introduction of the GUI in Windows suppose to make things easier for the less tech savvy? The Command Line is for advanced users, so how can they expect everyday users to be comfortable with it? It is a retrograde step IMHO.

    So, please Microsoft, BRING BACK "MANAGE WIRELESS NETWORKS" IN THE CONTROL PANEL!!


    It baffles me that MS is telling people to go back to a command prompt to solve this problem.   They had a perfectly usable gui interface that accomplished the task.   Why remove that from  8.1?
    Wednesday, January 08, 2014 10:13 PM
  • The fact that you have to use command line on this or use a third party tool is sad.

    My next PC will be Google Chrome.

    • Proposed as answer by dradmin Sunday, January 12, 2014 1:26 PM
    Sunday, January 12, 2014 5:36 AM
  • You can remove the profiles with the numerals only by deleting them from the registry or by using Intel PROSet. The command prompt as well as 3rd party utility didn't work--they would delete the profile, but the next time I would connect, I would get the little numbers re-appended (e.g., "linksys 2 3").

    When you have multiple APs with the same name but different numbers indicating which AP you're using (e.g., "mywifi1" for first floor and "mywifi2" for second floor), having Microsoft also decide to add their own numbers creates confusion. The user hovers over the WiFi icon and sees "mywifi 2" and thinks they're connected to the second floor AP and get irritated with you because they've got one or two bars instead of the five bars they should expect to see if connected to "mywifi2.

    Sunday, January 12, 2014 6:17 PM
  • You could try this: http://howifixedit.blogspot.com/2014/01/manage-wireless-networks-on-windows-8.html
    • Proposed as answer by AmarBanwait Wednesday, January 15, 2014 10:14 PM
    Sunday, January 12, 2014 9:34 PM
  • This dose not work if their is a space in the SSID

    C:\WINDOWS\system32>netsh wlan show profile name=XXXXXX XXXX key=clear
    There is no such wireless interface on the system.

    ... really?! I'm not looking for an interface but a profile... nice QA boyz!

    I'm starting to feel Vista-ish about Windows 8/8.1

    There should be two flavors of Win 8... Desktop (no Metro nonsense) and Tablet.

    Had the same problem and tried enclosing the profile name in quotes e.g. "XXXXXX XXXXXX" and that worked.

    • Edited by ruthlyngw Wednesday, January 15, 2014 8:16 PM
    Wednesday, January 15, 2014 8:15 PM
  • You could try this: http://howifixedit.blogspot.com/2014/01/manage-wireless-networks-on-windows-8.html

    FINALLY A "SOLUTION" (to remove unused ones)  THANKS!!!  THEY WERE ALL IN THERE

    Wednesday, January 15, 2014 10:16 PM
  • it is not gone,IN WINDOWS 8
    • Access Settings and then choose the Wireless icon.
    • Right-click on the network and choose Forget this Network.

    This does not give your the stored network profile window. It gives you the available wifi network list (the equivalent to left clicking on the system tray wifi icon in windows 7). What these IT professionals are looking for is the manage wireless networks window. Where you can delete old networks that you do not connect to any more, or create ad hock networks so that other computers can connect to you. I am pulling my hair out looking for this as well. Its plain stupid that it was removed.
    Thursday, January 16, 2014 3:17 PM
  • Unfortunately many of you are FAILING to understand the issue. More than that, very few of you actually understand what this, now removed, tool actually does. Many people who work in large business complexes that have very complicated networks or universities with enterprise level security NEED this function just to simply CONNECT to the wifi. Without the profiles and ability to edit the profiles, there is literally NO WAY to connect. STOP saying that "its not gone, you can remove the networks" No one important actually cares about removing the invisible network from their even more invisible list of network profiles. Instead, this thread was started because of real  issues.

    Now, is there anything better than that broken tool posted above?

    It is a fact that the former 'Manage Wireless Networks' has been removed, but the components to configure a wireless network are still there, just in a different place. If you go to the Charms Bar, and then to the wireless networks, one can right-click (long-tap) any wireless network within range. At this point there are several options. Among them are 'Forgot This Network' and 'View Connection Properties.'  Under 'View Connection Properties' you should find most all of the settings you will need to configure an Enterprise level Wifi network, I know I have. Hope this helps.

    --

    Tyler W


    K Tyler, how do I remove a wireless network that I am not near. Say I visit my out of state aunts house whose wifi was setup by bestbuy and the SSID name is "NETGEAR". Then I visit my buddies house back home and his network name is also "NETGEAR". Now, while at home, how would I go out about deleting my aunts connection before going to my friends house to avoid wireless network connection issues while there?
    Thursday, January 16, 2014 3:36 PM
  • Unfortunately many of you are FAILING to understand the issue. More than that, very few of you actually understand what this, now removed, tool actually does. Many people who work in large business complexes that have very complicated networks or universities with enterprise level security NEED this function just to simply CONNECT to the wifi. Without the profiles and ability to edit the profiles, there is literally NO WAY to connect. STOP saying that "its not gone, you can remove the networks" No one important actually cares about removing the invisible network from their even more invisible list of network profiles. Instead, this thread was started because of real  issues.

    Now, is there anything better than that broken tool posted above?

    It is a fact that the former 'Manage Wireless Networks' has been removed, but the components to configure a wireless network are still there, just in a different place. If you go to the Charms Bar, and then to the wireless networks, one can right-click (long-tap) any wireless network within range. At this point there are several options. Among them are 'Forgot This Network' and 'View Connection Properties.'  Under 'View Connection Properties' you should find most all of the settings you will need to configure an Enterprise level Wifi network, I know I have. Hope this helps.

    --

    Tyler W


    K Tyler, how do I remove a wireless network that I am not near. Say I visit my out of state aunts house whose wifi was setup by bestbuy and the SSID name is "NETGEAR". Then I visit my buddies house back home and his network name is also "NETGEAR". Now, while at home, how would I go out about deleting my aunts connection before going to my friends house to avoid wireless network connection issues while there?

    Hi Spearow808,

    Here is a bat script that I wrote & you can use that, it will take care of your problem for you. Just copy everything below the ----- line & paste it in Notepad & save it as wlan maintenance.bat (or any name you like as long as it has the bat extension).

    This bat file when you run it will display your list of saved wireless connections.

    You type in the name of the connection you want removed (in your case NETGEAR) or type a to remove all of them or c to cancel & remove none. Or you can remove your NETGEAR connection & it will ask if you want to delete another one. You just answer y for yes or n for no & it shuts down the command.

    You can also go to Start...Run (or Windows key + r) type in regedit & go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\NetworkList\Profiles & scroll through the list of profiles looking for the one you just deleted so you don't end up with a connection named NETGEAR 2 as you would in the example you described.

    Works with Win 7 or 8.

    Hope this helps.

    ---------------------copy text below---------------------------------

    @Echo off
    :Start
    netsh wlan show profile

    Echo (To delete all network profiles enter A)
    set /P INPUT= Enter network profile name to delete (C to cancel): %=%

    If /I %INPUT%==C goto Cancel
    If /I %INPUT%==A goto All

    netsh wlan delete profile name=%INPUT%
    set /P INPUT=Do you want to delete another profile? (Y/N): %=%

    If /I %INPUT%==y goto Start
    If /I %INPUT%==n goto Cancel

    :Cancel
    Exit

    :All
    netsh wlan delete profile name=* i=*
    pause
    Exit



    • Edited by cjsasl Thursday, January 16, 2014 4:32 PM correct typo
    Thursday, January 16, 2014 4:30 PM
  • I think this was removed... 0.o
    Friday, January 17, 2014 3:03 AM
  • They won't let me post a link here as they claim my account hasn't been verified.  I found this on a Microsoft webpage by doing a Google search for Manage Wireless Network Profiles Applies to Windows 8.1

    Manage wireless network profiles

    Applies to Windows 8.1, Windows RT 8.1

    If you need to change a wireless connection profile, you can usually do it by following these steps:

    1.  Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, tap Settings, and then tap Change PC settings.
    (If you're using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, click Settings, and then click Change PC settings.)

    2.  Tap or click Network, tap or click Connections, and then tap or click the connection you want to change.

    3.  On the page that appears, make the changes you want.

    Some tasks, such as deleting a profile, must be done at the command prompt. To do these tasks, open Command Prompt, and then type the appropriate command from the following table.

    Open Command Prompt by swiping in from the right edge of the screen, tapping Search (or if you're using a mouse, pointing to the upper-right corner of the screen, moving the mouse pointer down, and then clicking Search), entering Command Prompt in the search box, and then tapping or clicking Command Prompt.


    Task


    Instructions

    Delete a profile

    At the command prompt, type:

    netsh wlan delete profile name="ProfileName"

    Show all wireless profiles on the PC

    At the command prompt, type:

    netsh wlan show profiles

    Show a security key

    At the command prompt, type:

    netsh wlan show profile name="ProfileName" key=clear

    Move a network up in the priority list

    Connecting to a new network and choosing Connect automatically will place it at the top of the list.

    Stop automatically connecting to a network within range

    Tap or click the network in the network list, and then click Disconnect.

    Stop automatically connecting to a network that's out of range

    At the command prompt, type:

    netsh wlan set profileparameter name="ProfileName" connectionmode=manual



    How Windows determines connection priority

    Windows usually connects to networks in this order:

    1. Ethernet

    2. Wi-Fi

    3. Mobile broadband

    When you connect to a new Wi-Fi network, it’s added to the list, and Windows will connect to that network while it’s in range. If you connect to another Wi-Fi network while in range of the first network, Windows will prefer the second network over the first one.

    Mobile broadband networks are treated differently. If you manually connect to a mobile broadband network when there is a Wi-Fi network in range, the mobile broadband network is preferred just for that session. The next time you’re in range of both networks, the Wi-Fi network is preferred. This is because mobile broadband networks typically are metered.

    If you want to force your PC to prefer a mobile broadband network over Wi-Fi, tap or click the Wi-Fi network in the list of networks, and then click Disconnect. Windows won’t automatically connect to that Wi-Fi network.




    • Edited by JPTECH1111 Tuesday, January 21, 2014 6:07 PM
    Tuesday, January 21, 2014 5:55 PM
  • All of those netsh commands can be accessed through a nice UI using that tool: http://main.kerkia.com/Products/WinFi/description.aspx. I recommend you give it a try.
    Tuesday, January 21, 2014 9:18 PM
  • @yannlh Interesting find, just might be my key to installing 8.1...gonna test it out.

    Static From MrElectrifyer

    Saturday, January 25, 2014 10:56 PM
  • I have rolled back to Win8!

    At least I can do this in there - better than Win8.1

    Saturday, January 25, 2014 11:12 PM
  • Somewhere during the development of Vista, Microsoft forgot how to improve windows.  The disease went into remission a bit while they turned Vista into 7, but then it metastasized and gave birth to 8.  It's like watching a sci-fi movie about brain death, maybe Mad Cownado.
    Sunday, January 26, 2014 4:35 AM
  • Somewhere during the development of Vista, Microsoft forgot how to improve windows.  The disease went into remission a bit while they turned Vista into 7, but then it metastasized and gave birth to 8.  It's like watching a sci-fi movie about brain death, maybe Mad Cownado.

    It is actually a well documented engineering principle, called the Ballmer Peak. See image:

    Sunday, January 26, 2014 5:49 AM
  • Hi, I tried your method and it does not work, simply the code you wrote is incorrect.

    netsh wlan delete profile name=[profile name]   

    -The use of [profile name] is invalid, command prompt does not recognize this

    I tried the same way you instructed, except I made the following change, as per instructed by a different source:

    netsh wlan delete profile name="profile name"    

    -Replacing [profile name] for "profile name" is recognized by command prompt

    After making the changes, I got the following response from command prompt:

    "profile name" is deleted from interface "wi-fi"

    Thus deleting an old wi-fi connection off of your wi-fi list

    Hope this helps everyone else that got stuck at this step.. like myself.


    ps i am running windows 8.1


    • Edited by Lustrum 0005 Tuesday, January 28, 2014 4:25 AM
    • Proposed as answer by Lustrum 0005 Tuesday, January 28, 2014 4:26 AM
    Tuesday, January 28, 2014 4:24 AM
  • I find it hard to believe that anyone from Microsoft is taking the time to seriously and carefully reading any of the forums on the internet where the management of wireless networks and profiles under Windows 8.1 is being debated.

    To put it plain and simple, what most people are requesting for Windows 8.1 is a native GUI solution for managing wireless networks and profiles that does not rely on any CLI commands.

    In my humble opinion, the reason for this request is pretty simple: It is decidedly unacceptable to expect the average user today to even know what CLI is. Most of them have only seen glimpses of a CLI on movies where the star is one of those awesome and smart-looking hackers... I guess they would obviously feel like they're hacking their way into the core of their computer's operating system if they are asked to run a netsh wlan command under the CLI.

    On the other hand, administrators shouldn't be spending their precious time on forums like this one debating on the best way to manage wireless networks and profiles. The same goes for service desk support personnel, who are spending more and more time helping out average users with simple tasks like managing their wireless networks and profiles.

    Again, Microsoft: Give us a native GUI solution for managing wireless networks and profiles that does NOT rely on CLI commands.

    It shouldn't be that hard after all.

    Thank you,

    Carlos




    • Edited by Carlos Spörk Saturday, February 15, 2014 8:08 PM spelling
    Saturday, February 01, 2014 7:29 PM
  • I totally agree with Carlos. I had an issue with my laptop. After changing router password, I could not change the password on my laptop. Where is GUI for profile change? How come this was removed in Windows 8.1. On all devices I have, smartphones, tablets, previous windows computers, etc, I can change network passwords with GUI.

    I was able to delete the profile using netsh command. Once deleted, I was able to put in new password to connect. 

    Sunday, February 02, 2014 6:14 PM
  • @yannlh Seems like the WinFi app you suggested doesn't even work at all. On every startup, first I notice something fishy (it's trying to connect to the internet IP 199.85.212.28:80) then I get the following message (http://bit.ly/1alPX0u can't even copy it, it just crashes when I click the "copy" link).

    Sent the dev an email, hopefully this gets fixed, OR, Microsoft simply stop this idiocracy and bring back such fundamental GUIs of a PC.

    Perhaps they were thinking it will attract people's attention to the Windows Store, like the iPhone's out-of-the-box lack of basic dumbphone features attracted iUsers to the AppStore? Only time will tell...


    Static From MrElectrifyer

    • Proposed as answer by Ian P Parker Friday, February 14, 2014 8:40 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by Ian P Parker Friday, February 14, 2014 8:40 AM
    Tuesday, February 04, 2014 2:06 AM
  • Been looking for answers for a while now, as this is a total c*(k up!

    Microsoft are clearly aware of this, as they are displaying the functions below:

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-ZA/windows-8/manage-wireless-network-profiles

    On the off chance that MS actually browse these forums.......PLEASE can you get this functionality back! It is crazy! I am not sure for who's benefit it was removed, but after spending days searching for answers, I can assure you that there is not 1 thread where someone thinks what you have done is a good idea!

    Friday, February 14, 2014 8:43 AM
  • It's apparently a stupid move to "support devs". They dumped many Windows 7 GUIs just for that purpose,  at least that's the reason Surface reps told me...

    Static From MrElectrifyer

    Tuesday, February 18, 2014 3:04 AM
  • How is this meant to make the Administrators and users more efficient? Smarten up Microsoft you've dropped tools that people rely on to do their jobs quickly and effectively opened up a whole new area of mistakes through mistypes.

    Tuesday, February 18, 2014 8:00 PM
  • OK, now they've made it worse in Windows 8.1  The manageability from the Modern UI side bar is gone.  AND, they now store the profiles in your cloud storage under your Microsoft account.   As I've been playing with the prerelease over the past 2 months, I've now found that I've got about 30 of the same SSID stored in my information.  Each subsequent one has a number after it.  Such as "router", then "router 2" then "router 2 3" then "router 2 3 4" etc etc.  If I delete any one of them locally with the nice little tool from The Windows Club, it will eventually show back up.  And all of them showed up on a fresh installation of Windows 8.1 release that I just installed on a laptop.  I don't know how to delete these cloud based profiles.  Can anyone help?

    No one has a problem that SSID and passwords for their WiFi networks is being sent to the cloud? Corporations prohibit documents from being stored/transferred via these consumer cloud sites, but they are OK with W8.1 sending network IDs and PWs to them. Good luck getting broad enterprise adoption of 8. If companies were smart they wouldn't even let anyone BYOD with 8.
    Wednesday, February 19, 2014 4:21 PM
  • How is this meant to make the Administrators and users more efficient? Smarten up Microsoft you've dropped tools that people rely on to do their jobs quickly and effectively opened up a whole new area of mistakes through mistypes.


    I agree. We have an WPA/Enterprise/Radius network and a couple of new tablets with only WiFi which presents a series of challenges as they won't connect to our corporate WiFi without additional settings that are not accessible in Win 8.1. I have the WiFi connection coming down through Group Policy, but as they are not yet domain members they can't get the policy. So, I have to set up a separate WiFi router just to get them on the network. Then I can join them to the domain and get the policy. So, it's not the end of the world. But I'm surprised and frustrated that someone would remove the ability to edit advanced settings from the GUI. Admin time is better spent on things other than setting up ad hoc networks or using arcane NetSh commands to do things that were previously simple and accessible.

    • Edited by Muskiier Wednesday, February 19, 2014 10:27 PM spelling and grammar
    Wednesday, February 19, 2014 10:25 PM
  • Today I installed the WinFi app suggested by yannlh from his link at http://main.kerkia.com/Products/WinFi/description.aspx and it works beautifully. I did not experience the error mentioned by MrElectrifyer.  I made sure to download the correct version for Windows 8 at http://main.kerkia.com/Products/WinFi/Download.aspx.  Until Microsoft sees fit to correct its error, this is, by far, the best solution I have found on this forum.  Thanks, yannlh!
    Sunday, February 23, 2014 3:41 PM
  • Oh, that's interesting...perhaps some of the above registry changes resulted in it not working for me. Are your on Windows 8.0 or 8.1?

    Static From MrElectrifyer

    Wednesday, February 26, 2014 9:12 PM
  • Thanks....
    Tuesday, March 18, 2014 6:08 AM
  • Please note, for people having trouble with this method, that in order to keep the command prompt from auto closing, you must first type cmd /k (include the space) and then type your desired command. example:

    >cmd /k netsh wlan show profiles


    Monday, March 24, 2014 1:20 AM
  • There re 2 different ways to access these settings depending on if you're using Window 8 or 8.1 which is why some people can't right-click where suggested.

    This page has the best description on how to get there:

    http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/20085-wireless-network-profile-delete-windows-8-a.html

    Worked for me to "forget this network"...

    • Proposed as answer by Rayza73 Friday, March 28, 2014 7:12 PM
    Friday, March 28, 2014 7:11 PM
  • Thanks for the info but here's what I got when I tried to implement the solution: 

    Microsoft Windows [Version 6.3.9600]
    (c) 2013 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

    C:\Users\TA>netsh wlan show profiles
    The following helper DLL cannot be loaded: PEERDISTSH.DLL.
    Function WlanGetProfileList returns error 1169:
    There was no match for the specified key in the index.

    This is my first experience with 8, and now I know why I have been avoiding it at all costs!

    Sunday, March 30, 2014 7:15 AM
  • Thanks for the info but here's what I got when I tried to implement the solution: 

    Microsoft Windows [Version 6.3.9600]
    (c) 2013 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

    C:\Users\TA>netsh wlan show profiles
    The following helper DLL cannot be loaded: PEERDISTSH.DLL.
    Function WlanGetProfileList returns error 1169:
    There was no match for the specified key in the index.

    This is my first experience with 8, and now I know why I have been avoiding it at all costs!

    Please explain where you are running the netsh command from.

    To run the netsh command in Windows 8:

    • Point at the top right hand corner of the screen.
    • Slide down along the right edge of the screen and click on Search.
    • In the search box, type Command Prompt and hit Enter.
    • In black box which appears, type the netsh command you want to execute and hit Enter.

    For a list of the netsh commands applicable to the topic  of this thread see:

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-8/manage-wireless-network-profiles

    Tuesday, April 01, 2014 1:56 PM
  • For some reason, I wasn't able to right click on any of the SSID's I saw and wanted to modify the connection settings. I was able to successfully connect to and modify WLAN settings using the following:

    To connect to a hidden SSID, try the following, which worked for me on Windows 8.1 Pro. Go to Control Panel\Network and Internet\Network and Sharing Center.

    Then click on "Setup a new connection or network" and "Manually connect to a wireless network". There you can manage all of the encryption and other advanced settings.


    • Edited by segways Tuesday, April 01, 2014 8:46 PM
    Tuesday, April 01, 2014 8:43 PM
  • Open a run box window (or press win+R) then type cmd to open Windows 8 CLI.

    To see stored wireless profiles, type:

       netsh wlan show profiles

    This will show a list of saved profiles of your connected WLAN devices. Then you'll need to write/save/memorize the profile name that you want to change.

    To see the stored key (WPA/WEP/etc) of a specific profile:

       netsh wlan show profiles name=[profile name] key=clear

    You'll find the key content under security settings.

    To delete a stored profile:

       netsh wlan delete profile name=[profile name]

    This will delete the stored profile of every WLAN interface. If you want to delete the profile of a specific WLAN interface, you need to use the following:

       netsh wlan delete profile name=[profile name] interface=[interface name]

    This is a good alternative to perform the common actions for "Manage Wireless Network" avoiding to use third party software under Windows 8.

    I already know the profiles I want to remove/delete or whatever terminology you with to use.  All I want to do is get rid of/hide/destroy/  etc.  the profiles and probably interfaces I don't want.  How do I do this?

    When I win +8 I sure get the profiles but they disappear a /1000 second later.  I can't read that fast.  Can you?  How do I get this to stay long enouh to read and copy the profiles I want to delete/remove or whatever.

    Dude!! You're scaring people unnecesarilly with script - It is NOT gone and can easily be done through the UI!

    bests!

    For us stupid Dudes, non-GEEKS what is UI?  I see several references to UI but no explanation how to get to it.  

    Friday, April 04, 2014 7:41 PM
  • Microsoft has relented partially.  After updating to KB2919355 in Windows 8.1 you can again "Forget" a network by right-clicking it.  The same can be done from Charms->Settings->Network->Manage known networks.  It's not a complete return to how it was in Windows 7 but at least they are showing glimmers of sanity in their madness.
    Thursday, April 10, 2014 9:31 PM
  • Yes, some improvement.  An easier way than cmd prompt to get rid of all the wifi you pick up at hotels and restaurants.  Still would like the old Windows 7 way via UI from Network and Sharing Center (user interface as asked by an earlier poster). 
    Saturday, April 12, 2014 6:51 PM
  • Sorry, but you've completely missed the point. 
    Monday, April 14, 2014 3:33 PM
  • Sorry, but you've completely missed the point. 

    And I have missed the point of your post also.  Who is it that has missed the point, and what is the point?  I understand you still can't merge or delete unused networks as easy as you used to with Windows 7, and prior to this recent update you had to use the Command Prompt.  At least now with this update I can "manage" and delete wireless networks I will never connect to again, or avoid reconnecting to them later and having them show up as "network 2" as they did before.
    Tuesday, April 15, 2014 1:25 AM
  • This is just a matter of getting charms on a tablet. Swipe in to the center of the screen from the right edge of the screen, tap "Settings, then the wifi icon.
    Saturday, May 17, 2014 7:39 PM
  • Glad they came back to their senses in Windows 8.1.1. Now going to update my Surface Pro 😃 Ps. For those who don't want to use a spyware account (a.k.a. Microsoft Account) to login to your PC, tap the "create a new Microsoft account" link then you should see an option at the bottom of the page to use a local account. Screw the public cloud.

    Static From MrElectrifyer

    Saturday, May 17, 2014 8:49 PM
  • you sure explained it very well and I am able to do it. But following it what I wanna do is not deleite my wireless connection,what i wanna do is to change its settings to Google Public DNS.... Can you tell me how and where I have to go to do the change of the settings? Thank you much for any help .
    Sunday, June 08, 2014 6:11 PM
  • http://www.plus.net/support/software/dns/changing-dns-windows-8.shtml

    this are the instrutions to change settings in win 8. I will give it a try 

    Sunday, June 08, 2014 8:17 PM
  • Windows 8 - What a piece of crap. Keep removing functionality. It will help us to dump it fast. I don't buy a laptop if it comes with Windows 8. I work in IT corporate enviroment.  And thanks a lot to Adre.Ziegler for this handy tool to compensate the lack of useness of W8.

    Sunday, June 29, 2014 12:05 AM
  • Viewing this as an Admin was what helped me. I was doing a "helpful favor" in re-naming a wireless network for my parents and had the wrong password in my head, getting to the old saved one is a nightmare now!
    Thursday, July 03, 2014 1:33 AM
  • Thanks. This is what most people need. At least I did.
    Wednesday, July 23, 2014 1:46 AM